Multi fuel wood burning stoves

There seems to be a lot of variation in price, for the same kilowattage. Would anyone care to recommend a make, in the 5-8 kW range? What is the Miele of multifuel stoves?
Cheers Richard
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http://www.countryliving.co.uk/index.php/chatroom/topic/3571
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We have a Super Demon Boiler from the Hellfire Combustion Company.It produces 60,000 BTU/hr on wood and 75,000 BTU/hr on solid fuels. It has a back boiler and will heat up to 15 (I think) radiators. Excellent machine.
Regards
Jonathan
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Jonathan wrote:

If someone asks for a recommendation for a small runabout car for urban commuting and shopping, please bear in mind that it's not going to help the enquirer much if you tell them how happy you are with your 4x4 with a tow hook that will take a trailer in which you can carry 15 weeks' worth of shopping.
So here we have someone asking about stoves in the 5-8kW range, and you wax lyrical about a stove which gives 60-75 kBTU/h, which is around 20 kW. Duh.
Someone else mentioned Morso, which I would endorse. They make a range of multifuel stoves from just under 5 to just over 10 kW. Many of their models are named after animals, and I used to have a Squirrel, which is the baby of the range. Very happy with it. They make a variant of this which is approved for the burning of wood in smoke control areas.
Don't know about the "Miele" aspect, but they're pretty rugged.
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Ronald Raygun ( snipped-for-privacy@localhost.localdomain) wibbled on Tuesday 04 January 2011 10:06:

On that note, I'm happy with my Aga Little Wenlock Classic.
Technically it burns most fuels, except for house coal (too tarry) and petrocokes (too hot).
But in reality, it is best with anthracite, or better, high quality manufactured fuels (eggs) as you can't get much wood in it so it needs refuelling extremely often compared to burning phurnacite where it will burn flat out for a couple of hours or upto about 10 hours on slumber.
Thus, to the OP, I would recommend the biggest stove that will fit with a decent sized grate and ashpan so you can get a sensible amount of wood in if required.
Cheers
Tim
--
Tim Watts

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On 03/01/2011 21:19, geraldthehamster wrote:

I've got a Morso stove in the living room, marvellous - well built and seemingly efficient as these things go.
Rob
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In message

Not a recommendation but a couple of points....
Fire bars used for multifuel are more expensive as they are said to need chrome steel.
Heat output to the room is seriously diminished by back and side boilers.
We have a stove from Clearview (Shropshire), welded steel, underfloor draft option and airwash.
In my experience, airwash does work. The glass accumulates a grey finish over several weeks constant use. This can be readily scrubbed off with washing up liquid and sponge. Dry, mainly hardwood fuel. Previous experience with glass doors was black soot requiring pot scouring.
regards
--
Tim Lamb

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Thanks (with one obvious exception) for the replies.
I've been sort of offered a Stovax Sheraton in need of refurbishment, which on the face of it looks plausible if the price is right. I won't be using a back boiler. I'm intending to use it as a backup to our bottled gas central heating boiler (no mains gas out here). Next winter if I can avoid using the boiler so much, maybe it'll cost me less than the 400 quid I spent on gas in December just in keeping the house warm.
Then there's the question of fuel - where do stove users on the list get theirs from? I suppose it would be handy to make friends with a few tree surgeons. I've considered turning half my garden into an ash coppice, but from what I've read on the amount of land needed, I'd be very far from self-sufficiency, though it might make a contribution.
Cheers Richard
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geraldthehamster wrote:

join the club mate. Bottled gas is however bloody expensive.
Buy oil ant much cheaper these days y'know.

Aye, there's the rub. With what estates do provide wood now running out on a regular basis, and the smell of woodsmoke a lot more prevalent than it once was, wood is no longer a cheap fuel.
The average output of land used for biofuel is about 100mW per square meter. Given you probably need about a KW for a house on average, that's something like a hectare.

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I read somewhere recently, in one forum or other, that you;d need about 10 acres to be completely self-sufficient for a 3-4 bedroom house. Fortunately I' not aiming to be self-sufficient. With the space available I reckon I could grow 100 trees and still have some garden left, but on (for the sake of argument) 5 year rotation for ash, that would mean I was only coppicing 20 trees a year - say 100 poles if I was lucky.
Cheers Richard
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geraldthehamster wrote:

I would say that is about right.

poles don't make very good firewood. Best is mature trees and they take many years.

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You're right, coppicing as a source of fuel will never catch on.
Cheers Richard
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geraldthehamster wrote:

oh, it can, but its a poor source for all but boilers designed for it.
there isn't enough land area for it to make more than a small dent in energy usage: Its also possible that deforestation causes climatic shifts as well.
But if the alternative is bottled gas..you probably need a heatpump!
you can get about 100w/sq meter out of that.
Unless they carry on building windmills of course. Then there won't be any electricity at all :-)
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Coppicing isn't deforestation. Especially if you plant the coppice. It's entirely carbon neutral.
Cheers Richard
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Its not carbon neutral if you use tools, chainsaw fuel, transport to and from, etc.
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Now the wood burners have turned all the spare wood into CO2 they want to burn cheaper stuff like oil and gas to make even more CO2 instead of buying wood grown to burn. Typical I'm alright sod everyone else attitude.
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geraldthehamster wrote:

Local distributors.

Perhaps, but the beauty of multifuel stoves is that they don't just burn wood. Wood gives a nice pretty effect but has a low specific heat which means you need to feed the stove quite often. If you want heat with less fuss, the stuff to burn is one of the manufactured solid fuels, like Homefire or Phurnacite, then the stove will keep going 24/7 while needing attention only 2-3 times a day.
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Ronald Raygun ( snipped-for-privacy@localhost.localdomain) wibbled on Tuesday 04 January 2011 11:54:

Anthracite - DJ Davies of Wales, tonne at a time.
Phurnacite - Fergusson of Scotland, tonne
Both are shipped on a pallette of 40 x 25kg or 50 x 20kg bags and works out rather less all in (50-70 quid) less than the "local" coal merchants.
Only downside is unloading a pallette but even I can do that in an hour and bags are handy of you don't have a bunker - pile them up all over the place whereever's out the way.
--
Tim Watts

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Tim Watts wrote:

Fergusson *is* my local distributor. :-)
I do have a bunker, so get my phurnacite delivered in open 50kg sacks which they empty into the bunker, and take the sacks away to re-use. It's not a huge bunker so I can only take 300kg per delivery. At that quantity I'm currently paying 417 per tonne.
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Our local B&Q has a pile of pallets outside with a sign saying "Firewood - help yourself" You could try asking at your local stores.
John
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