OT:Dialling 1471

I just got a spam call which I didn't answer.
When phoning 1471 the automated voice gave the number as follows
0 double 1 7 4 5 6 3 double 2 3
(0117 456 3223)
If a person is slow at writing things down isn't it better if the av gave the numbers one at a time
0 1 1 7 and 3 2 2 3
Because as it is, you have to wait for the av to say "double" before you know which number you're going to have to write down at twice the speed of the other numbers. Not the end of the world but it seems a strange way of going about things.
michael adams
...
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Good though process. Should be said "Two doubled"
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I can't see what's wrong in just saying "two two"
I can't honestly believe anyone is going to wonder "did it just say two, or two two" ?
As its an automated voice its not as though they have to save on the number of twos they're allowed to say or anything.
michael adams
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On 29/08/2019 14:00, michael adams wrote:

Do it the German way ?. five and twenty blackbirds ..
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2019 14:00:22 +0100, "michael adams"

I believe the old GPO rule was not to say 'treble'. I cannot remember whether it was 'three double three' or 'double three three' but I believe 'treble three' was not allowed.
Can anyone confirm?
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On Thursday, 29 August 2019 13:35:08 UTC+1, michael adams wrote:

Interesting point as I/we have this problem today with our electronics lab induction video. How should we say the emergrnacy number to contact security which is 3333 should we say 3 3 3 3 or double 3 double 3 , or 3, treble 3 etc.
of couse not forgeting that a significant number or students whose their first langauge isn't English.
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On 29/08/2019 14:18, whisky-dave wrote:
<snip>

Fish, chips and peas twice?
Bingo!
--
Clive

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On Thu, 29 Aug 2019 06:18:14 -0700, whisky-dave wrote:

From memory French phone numbers are always quoted in pairs.
so 1234567890 becomes twelve,thirty four, fifty six,seventy eight,ninety
Although, weirdly, the numbered range of Fiats (for those that can remember) which were one-two-five in English, were the full fat cento venticinque ... although the 500 (topolino) was the same in both
Bloody foreigners eh ?
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Which produces some interesting ambiguities with the french for 80 which is 'quatre vingts'.
--
Chris Green
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2019 18:23:38 +0100, Chris Green wrote:

huitante as I recall. Belgian/Swiss french is quatre vingt
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On 29/08/2019 21:27, Jethro_uk wrote:

Wrong way around. French French uses quatre vingt.
SteveW
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2019 21:52:17 +0100, Steve Walker wrote:

It can be confusing - I heard and used huitante in France no problem (having learned to count in Italian before French, where it's ottanta / cf/ huitante).
That said I don't hear any confusion with something like douze:quatre- vingt-cinq:trente-six;cinquante-deux (for example) ?
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Yes, as long as you parse the number in twos it is *mostly* unambiguous.
In the cartoon http://www.itchyfeetcomic.com/2016/11/cryptic-sequence.html that Adam Funk quoted earlier in the thread, there was the confusion between quatre and quatre-vignts, but that should never apply because a 4 on its own would be treated as forty-something and combined with the second digit, so "quatre" can only ever occur as part of quatre-vignts.
There is the confusion between:
quatre-vingts, onze, trente-six (80 11 36)
and
quatre-vingts-onze, trente-six (91 36)
So they need to put a long pause in the first one!
The same applies to any number in the range 2-19 that follows 80 (not for 1 because 21, 31, ..., 91 all have *et* un, so you've be able to distinguish between 81 (quatre-vignts-et-un) and 80 1 (quatre-vignts [pause] un).
Do French numbers with an odd number of digits get parsed into two from the left or the right?
Is it:
1 23 45 67 (un vignt-trois quarante-cinq soixante-sept)
or
12 34 56 7 (douze trente-quatre cinquante-six sept)
I presume the second, to avoid the quatre vingt (4 20) or quatre-vignts (80) confusion.
How common is it in non-English-speaking countries for phone numbers to be divided into tens-and-units pairs (forty one, fifty seven) rather than saying each digit separately with suitable pauses at conventional intervals? Given the potential for confusion in French, and the backwards-way-round counting in German and Dutch, you'd think that those countries, out of all of them, would *not* make tens-and-units numbers.
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On 30/08/2019 10:42, Jethro_uk wrote:

There is definitely ambiguity in quatre-vingt:douze (or is it quatre-vingt-douze?)
Andy
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family.me.uk says...

Some women at a bus stop were speaking French while my wife was also waiting.
One of the women asked my wife, in English, for some directiona.
My wife told her to catch a 77 bus and the women returned to her group.
My wife asked "Where in Belgium are you from?"
"How did you know we are Belgian?"
"Because you said Septante Sept to your friends. If you were French you would have said Soixante Dix-Sept!"
The women were impressed!
(My wife didn't know at the time that it is the same in Switzerland.)
--

Terry

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On 29/08/2019 14:18, whisky-dave wrote:

Extra digits don't usually matter, so just tell them to keep dialing threes until someone answers ;)
SteveW
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2019 13:35:04 +0100

In all the many years I lived in the USA, I never heard the 'double -X' form used. It was a shock returning to live here and having to get used to it again, and it still confuses.
--
Davey.

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On 29/08/2019 14:32, Davey wrote:

A little off topic, but why do people say "two times" and not twice?
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My parents used to say "Five and twenty past" for 25 past!!!
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On 29/08/2019 15:39, John wrote:

Four and twenty blackbirds, baked in a pie.
Cheers
--
Clive

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