OT: cheapest way to get 17yo on the road

OK, totally, *totally* off-topic I know but usual apologies: uk.d-i-y == fount of all wisdom etc ...
17yo wants to learn to drive. His mum has an automatic, I have a van on commercial vehicle insurance. He'll want a car of his own when he passes. I'm wondering about buying a cheapie and insuring it myself with him on my policy. What's the cheapest sort of car from the insurance point of view? (since at his age insurance costs typically many times as much as you have to pay to actually put a car on the road)
--
John Stumbles

My karma ran over my dogma
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/02/2010 20:02 John Stumbles wrote:

I've *heard* (ie no direct experience) that it's best to insure it in his name with you as a named driver as it starts him earning NCB earlier.
No doubt a quick check with the meerkats will confirm or otherwise.
Simples!
--
F



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
F wrote:

That is often still prohibitively expensive alas.
Usually making him a named driver on your policy is more cost effective even without accumulating NCD.
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Rumm wrote:

Too dangerous, he could have an accident and remove fathers NCD.
Get him on his own after the first year.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
F wrote:

I would go along with that, but only for the first year, then tell him he is on his own after that. It makes far better, more careful drivers :-)
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my experience there is no "cheap" way, (and rightly so in my opinion, but that's another question). It does appear to make quotes lower to have mum or dad on the policy as a named driver so confused or gocompare are your friends.
This might be useful to find low group rated cars: http://www.thatcham.org/abigrouprating /
Si
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot wrote:

With some companies like Direct Line, named drivers start to accrue a discount based on how long they've been named. A bit like NCD but not as generous but definitely better than a kick in the teeth. Being 17 AND having a Y chromosome are real pain when it comes to insurance and if you build up some discount for a couple of years before they're insured in their own names so much the better.
That said, beware of having second car with you as the first named driver and you son as a named driver if it really is him who's doing the lion's share of the mileage. Insurance companies love folk who do that as they can legitimately weasel out of paying any claim whilst taking premiums.
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Feb 2010 22:15:50 -0000, Tim wrote:

That raises an interesting question - who is the main user of the car? If you are using it to teach a learner driver, aren't you in charge of the vehicle? After passing it obviously becomes a simple matter.
SteveW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Walker wrote:

Hence my comment, Direct line did offer a clause "for the purposes of learning to drive" and supervised by known main driver for a modest increase.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Feb 2010 23:49:37 +0000, James Salisbury <nntp.dsl.pipex.com> wrote:>Steve Walker wrote:

Direct Line - One of the best companies at avoiding paying claims.
To the OP: Get your son to pay for it all - that's the cheapest way and he will learn some good life lessons as a result.
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I recall that some insurance companies now offer a pay-as-you drive insurance via a black box fitted with gps. IIRC, the system has two rates depending on time the vehicle is driven, i.e after dark would triple the cost. Since its gps I assume it also keeps a tally of max speed driven etc to penalise boy racers.
Might be worth a look and certainly cheaper than paying 1000 insurance on a 1 litre 15yr old car. If he was prepared to drive low daylight miles in the first year it would be a shrewd way to build up the NCD.
Dave.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I recall that some insurance companies now offer a pay-as-you drive insurance via a black box fitted with gps. IIRC, the system has two rates depending on time the vehicle is driven, i.e after dark would triple the cost. Since its gps I assume it also keeps a tally of max speed driven etc to penalise boy racers.
Might be worth a look and certainly cheaper than paying 1000 insurance on a 1 litre 15yr old car. If he was prepared to drive low daylight miles in the first year it would be a shrewd way to build up the NCD.
Dave.
It is mentioned here
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/8494228.stm
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are also firms that will insure learners by the month. If you think he's going to pass quite quickly, might be worth investigating.
MBQ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IMO there is no requirement to insure a car for a learner.. just get a driving instructor to teach him. It cheaper and he is likely to be a better learner after passing a test, after all passing your test just means you are trusted to learn on your own, not that you can drive.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They say practice makes perfect.
To practice in your own/parents car between lessons you need to be insured.
MBQ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Stumbles wrote:

Don't know your age or circumstances, but I'm 45, 7 years NCB and recently (Thursday) got several quotes for myself to drive my new car - a Vectra 2.2 SRI, they all came in at around 400-500, then I added a second driver, 17, not yet pased test and they came back at between 2,500 - 4000.
I had similar results last year with a VW passat 2.0i
YMMV
--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably have a similar problem with a Porche Turbo ;-)
Any car with a lot of power - and I assume the Vectra 2.2 SRI is vaguely related to the old Cavalier SRi - will be cheap(ish) for a mature driver and scarily expensive with a young driver.
Quite right, too. You don't want a learner out in a performance car. Too easy to get into trouble too quickly. You don't want to be in the passenger seat when the learner hits the accelerator insteads of the brake.
We bought a fairly old mid range family saloon to teach the kids to drive (Nissan Bluebird 1600 IIRC) on the principle that it had a lot of metal between the driver and the road. Better survivability than a small car of the equivalent age. Sedate and safe are the things to aim for. Boring family saloons generally fit the bill - the models with the smaller engine not the super duper performance version.
We were not even offered insurance for the kids when we enquired about our Volvo 760 Turbo Estate :-)
Cheers
Dave R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

May be worth asking for quotes for 'classic' insurance, where 'classic' usually means at least 15-20 years old. That tends to build in the fact that drivers of classics take better care. No idea if it's available to 17 year olds. It doesn't work in the normal NCD system so you don't build it up, however. If you can get it, the price depends more on the value of the vehicle than the insurance group.
There are various brokers around who do it - you won't find it on a price comparison site.
Theo
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sounding much like they were saying:

Not normally. There's usually a minimum age of 25 for the main driver - and a requirement for another vehicle to be available as the "main car".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rightly so - too powerful for someone with no experience to understand how to control, too flashy for someone of that age to drive only at a level within their limited skillset (even if they had any concept of their limitations, which they won't), so the risk of a significant payout is about as high as it could be, and the risk of someone's injury or death.
The risks are somewhat reduced (although not proportionally) if they stick with something like a 1.2l bog-standard hatchback, not tarted up in any way, until they've developed some reasonable driving skills (and I don't mean passed the test - that's just a start - learning to drive continues for years after that).
Some years ago, at work we had a conversation between colleagues when one of their kids announced he was going to get a bike, and the father was very worried what that might lead to. There was probably no realistic way to stop him, but we thought at least if he went into it with some understanding of how fragile humans are and how easily live is lost (which is something teenagers have no concept of at all), he might be more sensible. I found a web site which was full of motor accident photos, no guts spared, mostly teenagers of course, and his father went through some of them with him. A couple of years later, the kid lost a friend in a typical teenage car crash (which didn't involve him). He said to his dad that the session with the photos had had quite an effect on him, and he thought about it whenever he saw friends showing off in their cars/bikes. So at least with that kid, this probably worked exactly as intended.
Modern western society's obsession with hiding people from the consequences of others' stupid accidents probably goes some way towards building the "I'm indestructable" mentality most teenagers (and many into their 20's and 30's) have.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.