new mains drill

I have a decent SDS drill and a makita battery drill. But no mains drill since a killed a cheapy a few years ago. My makita does not have the oomph to turn the 50mm holesaw once the whole saw (d'ya see that ?) is in the timber when drilling the bottom of the socket for the newel post spigot, so I need a mains drill to finish the job. Or a chuck adapter for the SDS (can do rotation only). Any recommendations (sub 100 quid) ? Simon.
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On 24/06/2013 10:14, sm_jamieson wrote:

(d'ya see that ?) is in the timber when drilling the bottom of the socket for the newel post spigot, so I need a mains drill to finish the job.

Unless you think you will need a mains drill for other stuff, then an SDS chuck adaptor will be far cheaper, That's what I use when I need a mains drill.
eBay has loads...
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On 24/06/2013 13:02, Toby wrote:

Agreed.
However, my SDS (and I think this is usual) has a relatively low top speed (as do many battery drills). Nowhere near that of a good, dedicated drill.
Also, many SDS machines are far too long (overall, and especially with SDS-chuck adaptor) to use conveniently in any but easy-access locations.
Until I positively need one, I will not buy a new mains drill. But that might be short-sighted of me.
--
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On Monday, June 24, 2013 1:15:46 PM UTC+1, polygonum wrote:

Screwfix have an SDS chuck adapter - it'll give me a chance to go in the new store. If SDS speed not enough, I'll then consider a mains drill.
Simon.
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On 24/06/2013 13:02, Toby wrote:

My SDS is the "next size up" so is a bit heavy for medium weight stuff. I have a 750 watt Ryobi which doesn't get much use but is invaluable when I do need it.
I think it was under £40 from Screwfix but doesn't seem to be in their current lineup but you should find something adequate for well under a ton. Even the Titan gets decent reviews (not that Screwfix is my first choice source any more).
http://www.screwfix.com/c/tools/percussion-drills/cat830814?cm_sp=Tools-_-Drills-_-PercussionDrills
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On 24/06/2013 10:14, sm_jamieson wrote:

I can't remember actually needing to dig out my mains drill since having a decent cordless and a SDS...
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John.
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On Tuesday, June 25, 2013 1:12:21 AM UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

I bought a cheap mains drill years ago. I found using an adapter in an SDS drill to large,heavy, clumsy and imprecise for most jobs. Cheap drill was also needed for driving the Tormek, which was another waste of money.
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Drilling large holes in wood - like say when fitting a mortice lock to a new door. Cordless goes flat too quickly - and SDS with normal chuck added simply larger less wieldy and slower than a mains drill.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 25/06/2013 10:25, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I agree the chuck adaptors on an SDS are not ideal for many jobs, but I have no difficulty using a decent 18V cordless for large holes in wood... I did the 2" hole into newel post bases using an expansive bit in one without any difficulty, and a 5" holesaw through 3/4" ply. I would also expect to be able to do several mortice locks on a single battery.
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On 25/06/2013 17:05, John Rumm wrote:

Ah but I expect your bits were sharp
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On 25/06/2013 17:23, stuart noble wrote:

Yup, Silverline's finest ;-)
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On Tuesday, June 25, 2013 5:05:32 PM UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

Well I got an SDS chuck adapter and it was fine since the hole saw already had a path to follow so the wobbliness did not matter. But otherwise it would not be the most precise method of drilling. The friction of the holesaw once it was all the way in the timber and relatively slow speed of the makita battery drill was the issue. Loads of power with the SDS and adapter of course. I had thought of using the spade type bits (expansive or a 50mm one if available) but assumed the hole would be too messy. Usually recommended is a forstner bit (but they go off track easily) or a holesaw. By the way, I did the first part of the hole using a pillar drill with the head turned backwards to get it vertical - until I ran out of travel and the belt started slipping ! Simon.
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On 26/06/2013 09:34, sm_jamieson wrote:

The expansive bits seem to cut quite clean... To lower the torque requirement, I find its better to drill a 5mm pilot hole dead centre first, this stops the worm drive from pulling the bit into the work so hard. Then you can control the feed rate better.
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sm_jamieson wrote:

> since a killed a cheapy a few years ago.

> the socket for the newel post spigot, so I need a mains drill to finish the job.

I'd go for a chuck adaptor. Higher speeds just tend to overheat larger bits and at 25mm radius, it's angular speed will be pretty high on a /slow/ SDS. The SDS torque will let you lean on it more so it'll have more bite per tooth rather than bogging down.
Scott
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On Thursday, June 27, 2013 9:44:12 AM UTC+1, Scott M wrote:

The holesaw in chuck adapter worked well and full speed was much too fast, burning the wood etc. When I realised this and ran it slower, it had plenty of torque and cut very well. I think I will do without a "standard" mains drill. Simon.
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I'd not pay a lot of money for one, but a 20 quid Lidl special would still finds its uses with me.
--
*I don't have a license to kill, but I do have a learner's permit.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

My first drill was a nice green mains Bosch which has fallen out of favour besides SDS and a cordless drill & impact driver set. The few times it does get wheeled out is to deal with 11-13mm drill bits as the cordless chuck, as per many, only goes up to 10mm. And that's only when the work can't be crammed into the pillar drill!
Scott
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On 27/06/2013 10:32, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Fact is, having more than one drill is a big time saver. Countersink, pilot hole etc. It's not so much the time it takes to change the bits but the time it takes to find them again after you've put them down somewhere
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On 27/06/2013 12:02, stuart noble wrote:

Indeed multiple drills are very useful. I have three cordless of my own (big Bosch and two small Makita ones - impact and ordinary). Plus SDS. And access to a pair of Makita cordless.
Still have no great desire for a mains non-SDS drill.
--
Rod

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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 12:02:16 +0100, stuart noble

For repetitive tasks, it *is* the time taken to change back and forth that's the pita. Which is why I decided to hoard Makita cordless. :) Oh boy; that's paid for itself already, the amount of time I've saved having one with a drill, screwdriver bit, and square-section drive all to hand.
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