New Electrical Regulations 2005 (UK)

I've been trying to understand these electrical regulations that I think came in 2005. At the time I remember lots of rumors about ALL DIY electrical work being illegal, but at the time I didn't have a house so wasn't interested in the laws. I have been reading the building regulations part P and it seems quite clear to me that I cannot do DIY electrical work in the kitchen or bathroom without applying for permission etc.
After speaking to some electicians this doesn't seem to be the case. One said that it only applies to new buildings or extensions. However, from what it says it doesn't seem to suggest that it is only for new buildings.
What I actually need to do is add a spur for a new cooker hood (in the kitchen). It is a pretty simple job. What would the best way be to get this job done? I believe that notification will probably cost around 67 (minimum charge)? So an electrician (that can self certify) may not actually be much more than that? I could do all of the work myself, so could an electrician just inspect our work, or could we groove the wall out etc and just let the electrician connect the wires?
A family member has actually done most of the work already (without my consent) telling me that it is legal because he's asked an electrician. I'm not sure what I should be doing now. Nobody I know seems to understand these new regulations, how long would it take if I gave notice? Would it be a few weeks before I had permission to start the work?
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On 2006-12-09 15:57:14 +0000, petermcmillan snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com said:

The choices are to use an electrician who is a member of one of the approved trade organisations (NICEIC and a number of others) - they can self certify or if you wish to DIY, to apply for a Building Notice at your local authority.

In a kitchen or bathroom it is always notifiable. You can do minor work without notification outside these areas such as adding a spur, making a repair or replacing a fitting. A new circuit is notifiable. There is not a factor relating to new or existing building as there is with some Building Regulations.

Ask your local authority.

Quite possible

That's a valid option

That's not the case.

You would need to ask your local authority.
Another option is to take no action at all, although this would not be in accordance with the legislation.
However, in the event of an accident/fire etc. that could be attributed to the work, there could be an insurance issue. There may be an issue if/when you come to sell the property. You would have to declare that work had been done. This would probably trigger the buyer into wanting an electrical inspection (personally I'd want one anyway), and then the discussion would be about who pays.
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said:

I have never seen a house fire that was caused by faulty electrical work. I have seen one were people have had curtains catch fire after falling against halogen lights - also people that have put a heater near something - all of which are wrongly labelled by the news as "electrical fires". I have seen fires caused by electrical goods, but not the actual house wiring. That goes for houses with rubber coated cables to PVC. I have seen a few fires in factories caused by packing too many cables in to trunking that was too small.
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On Sat, 9 Dec 2006 20:35:26 -0000, Mark wrote:

The commonest cause of electrical fires is not faulty fixed wiring, but overloaded extensions, adapters and faulty appliances. Part P only makes the situation worse by making it more difficult to install sockets where they are needed.
Indeed the good track record for fixed wiring is somewhat amusing considering that a majority of the installations in the UK predate current wiring standards, and I've seen some horrors such as daisy chained 13A sockets installed by so-called professionals.
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Or just do it like you did before in the knowledge that there is close enough to zero chance of any consequences to not worry about.
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I did suggest that option as well, as did several others.
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petermcmillan snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Less than 1% of diyers currently report minor notifiable works under part p, just so you have some perspective. Re selling and surveys, all surveys are normally paid for by the buyer.
NT
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wrote:

Good I am glad to see that the government is being ignored! How does anyone know this?
The way I look at it, you may want to make further changes before you sell, so why bother to get the current version approved. You can always apply for retrospective approval.
--

Michael Chare







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Michael Chare wrote:

In the event a disaster occurred which was down to bad electrickeryship you can bet your bottom dollar that your insurance company wouldn't accept that excuse.
Andrew
--
You probably don't want to reply to my published newsgroup email address
because your email is guaranteed to be treated as spam. If you really do
  Click to see the full signature.
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so
Yes, damage due to faulty design, workmanship and materials is excluded but it does matter who did the work.
One just has to ensure that work is done properly.
--

Michael Chare





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wrote:

Less than 1% of diyers currently report minor notifiable works under part p, just so you have some perspective. Re selling and surveys, all surveys are normally paid for by the buyer.
NT
Try proving when the work was done and by who! Almost impossible unless you use the new cable colours. You can still get plenty of red and black T&E.
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Source of information, just OOI?
--
Andy

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Purely out of interest (having no intention of doing it), I recently asked my local authority, the London Borough of Haringey, how much it cost to apply for a building notice for electrical work. Answer: "Oh that depends on the value of the work".
So, for DIY-ing a new ring main: let's say 30 quid for a few metres of cable and a few sockets?
Don't think they've thought that one through.
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They charge based on a commercial price for the job. You can't get away with a materials only DIY valuation.
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rrh wrote:

kinda defeats the object of DIYing.
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I've been trying to understand these electrical regulations that I think came in 2005. At the time I remember lots of rumors about ALL DIY electrical work being illegal, but at the time I didn't have a house so wasn't interested in the laws. I have been reading the building regulations part P and it seems quite clear to me that I cannot do DIY electrical work in the kitchen or bathroom without applying for permission etc.
After speaking to some electicians this doesn't seem to be the case. One said that it only applies to new buildings or extensions. However, from what it says it doesn't seem to suggest that it is only for new buildings.
What I actually need to do is add a spur for a new cooker hood (in the kitchen). It is a pretty simple job. What would the best way be to get this job done? I believe that notification will probably cost around 67 (minimum charge)? So an electrician (that can self certify) may not actually be much more than that? I could do all of the work myself, so could an electrician just inspect our work, or could we groove the wall out etc and just let the electrician connect the wires?
A family member has actually done most of the work already (without my consent) telling me that it is legal because he's asked an electrician. I'm not sure what I should be doing now. Nobody I know seems to understand these new regulations, how long would it take if I gave notice? Would it be a few weeks before I had permission to start the work?
You keep quoting words like "legal" and "illegal" which usually refer to criminal law. if you are such an expert in "regulations" that are advisory can you tell me which Laws have been broken by your relative and which could be broken by an electrician? I think the main problem is that people are confusing "regulations" that are advisory with those that are mandatory and civil with criminal law. If you are satisfied that the work you or a relative has done is OK, why do you want to go and advertise it to the world. What are you hoping to achieve, exactly what do you want to happen? I can never understand people like you. Either you are retired and very bored, or just want some attention and to be involved in a situation you have created. Just get the work done, invite people to view it and stick an advert in the local paper telling everyone. The best advice is find a hobby to keep yourself occupied.
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Mark wrote:

Uh? If I was an expert I wouldn't be asking these questions would I? When these regulations came out all of the media (radio/TV etc.) were using the word 'illegal'. So is it not illegal to not comply with these regulations? Can I not be fined or anything?

No, I don't understand how this would be getting attention.

Uh? I don't understand what you're getting at. How am I getting attention? You're not a troll or something are you? If I was certain that this job was legal, it would have been done without involving anybody else at all! I've got more than enough work and hobbies to keep myself occupied!
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petermcmillan snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

In principle you can be fined and made to correct any faulty work.
Part P was introduced by the Building (Amendment) (No.3) Regulations 2004, which can be found here: http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2004/20043210.htm and subsequently amended by section 20 of the Building and Approved Inspectors (Amendment) Regulations 2006, here: http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2006/20060652.htm
These regulations are Building Regulations made under the Building Act 1984 - see the explanatory booklet available from here http://www.communities.gov.uk/index.asp?id31116
Approved document P (Electrical Safety - Dwellings), which sets out in plain language what you can and can't do can be downloaded from here http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/england/professionals/en/4000000001253.html
--
Andy

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Is it any worse than using Google which appears not to "quote" at all..lol
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On Sat, 9 Dec 2006 20:31:16 -0000, Mark wrote:

He's not retired, he's still living at home with mummy and unable to even get himself his own apartment close to where he works. He could not find his arse with both hands, a mirror and a copy of Gray's Anatomy.
It's the last one, Peter McDumpling always dreams up fantastic, complicated situations that no one else can solve and spends days blethering about how he could not take the one simple, obvious step that would solve the problem.
If you can stand it Google for his dribbling comments about Seicentos, trombones and pinking. Oh and his legendary driving skills, Kent to Reading, three times around the M25 because he couldn't find out how to get off it.
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