Moving a socket

Hi everyone,
I have a socket which is currently at 5 feet high on one side of a wall, which I want to move to about 1 foot high on the other side of the wall.
Is there any sensible way of extending the cable, or am i going to have to tear out lots of wall to replace the cables?
Any advice greatly appreciated
Paul
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Easiest way is to remove the existing socket, join the cable in the back box using srew terminal block and put a blanking plate on it.
Paul_UK wrote:

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Paul_UK wrote:

You can use insulated crimps to join new cables to the existing ones.
You will need to use a decent crimp tool though, one with a ratchet mechanism is ideal. The cheap ones just can't make a good enough joint.
Before you do this you should check that any existing sockets in the room that will have the new one, are on the same MCB or fuse. If not then you will need to label the new socket to make that clear.
You should also make sure that the all of the cables end up in the "safe zones" for cables. If any of the wiring for your new socket goes outside that zone, then you will need to protect it in the usual way.
Details of the safe zones can be found at: http://www.niceic.org.uk/downloads/Pocket%20Guide%206.pdf
If you are happy to replace the existing socket with a blanking plate, then you could use suitably sized terminal blocks to join the cables rather than crimps.
You may find it easier to remove the existing socket completely and then install a new one in the other room.
John
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John White,
Electrical Contractor
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If the existing socket is not a spur why not leave that where it is and have the new socket as a spur. If the new socket is on the same vertical line as the old you can drill through the wall behind the original socket and chase a groove down the other side of the wall for the cable without the need to provide protection as it will be vertically above the new socket.
--
Roger Chapman

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On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 22:46:42 +0100 someone who may be Roger

Are you suggesting that the OP runs a spur from a spur?
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David Hansen, Edinburgh
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Read the first line of the quote from Roger again.
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Chris French


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On Tue, 22 Aug 2006 09:02:00 +0100, David Hansen

No - he said "If the existing socket is NOT a spur..."
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Frank Erskine
Sunderland
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Which part of "If the existing socket is not a spur" did you not understand?
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Roger Chapman

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