Mounting telephone extension box on drywall

Hi,
I've wired up a telephone extension. The wire is routed through some drywall and pops out the other side in the room where the box is going to attach.
I've got a plastic surface mount box (combined with a telephone/ADSL dual socket front plate).
To begin with, and until I get more confidence with cutting holes in the wall, I'm going to surface mount this. Given it is drywall I'm not sure the box I have could be recessed anyway - wouldn't it just fall into the gap? What would keep it in place?
The box has various dimples to indicate drilling points. I want to drill them without shattering the plastic. Is there any particular advice on doing this?
There are 11 of these points around the rear which is nice. I presume two should be enough for a firm fitting...
Thanks in advance,
Tris.
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snipped-for-privacy@extricate.org wrote:

You get a special drywall back box - these have lugs to engage and grip the back of the plasterboard whilst a front lip prevents it falling through.
It's not hard to cut PB - mark around the drywall back box, making sure you are clear of any wall struts. You can get away with a stanley knife, cutting progressively - or use a hand held hole saw and a drill on 2 corners.

I just punch them out with a small screwdriver and a light tap with the palm of my hand.

Generally. If you are not confident of your fixings, use 4, but 2 are usually OK for a telephone plug.

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Thanks. After some consideration I think I will go this way -- all the other sockets in the house are flush, and I want to avoid this sticking out any further than the skirting board (which it will do if surface mounted). Usual furniture considerations...

I've held the back box up to the light now and can see that they are "weaker", as are various points arounds the side. So this should work nicely. Although this seems redundant now!
I'll pop down to B&Q in a bit to grab a 85mm dry-line box. From memory though, when I was last there they only had these in metal. I presume I can mix a plastic front plate with a metal back, given that this has been used for the electrical sockets!
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On 20 Apr 2007 03:54:19 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@extricate.org"

A metal box isn't a dry lining box. It doesn't have the lugs to hold it in the plasterboard. B&Q will do dry line boxes though, you just didn't know what they were last time you saw them!
--
Regards,
Stuart.
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I popped down at lunchtime and got one. To be precise, I got 5 --- they were completely sold out of the single boxes for some reason, and I only got the five-pack by hunting behind the shelves!
It isn't a fancy one with spring loaded lugs but looks like it will do the trick.
I had to pick up some screws as well -- bizarrely, the fancy ADSL/ telephone filter faceplate I bought came with screws which fit its own backplate only...
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Are you sure that you've got the right ADSL component? Filtered faceplates are designed to fit onto a BT linebox in place of the standard faceplate, *not* directly into an empty back-box.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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I know what you mean. I have one of these though:
http://www.solwise.co.uk/adsl_splitters.htm
(The dual socket on the far right)
I've decided to go for this solution as although I could fit the NTE5 one on the master (thus filtering all the telephone sockets...), I wanted a point in the study which would serve both ADSL and a phone.
Anyway, I've tested the above splitter tonight and it is working.
I've also made the hole in the plasterboard, by way of stanley knife and metal ruler (I'm going to have to use better tools next time though, I think it was more luck than judgement that everything worked out). Backbox fits great. I haven't done the final wiring yet though.
I do need to adjust the backbox slightly... it's not straight by just a few degrees (if that). What's the best way of gently rotating it? Just filing the plasterboard at the sides? (I know that the ideal solution would have been to get it straight first time).
Thanks,
Tris.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Fair enough - Solwise seem to have changed their terminology! In the old days they would have called the ADSL-NTEFACE a faceplate, and your device would have been a slave socket with filtered and unfiltered outlets, or somesuch.

Fine - but you'll also need filters in any other sockets where analog equipment (phones, faxes, etc.) is plugged in. Using a filtered faceplate (old definition!) in the master socket would have been a better solution technically - but you would then have needed digital extension wiring to the study in addition to the analog wiring.

Good!
I wouldn't have - and didn't - recommend a Stanley knife for cutting a hole in plasterboard, although it's fine for scoring prior to dividing a large sheet into two. A small sharp saw is required for what you were doing.

If the sides of the hole are not horizontal and vertical, you will have to make the hole slightly bigger to square it up. Try to remove as little as possible. You may find that you can rotate the faceplace *slightly* in the box - to get *that* straight even though the box isn't. Slacken the screws a bit, twist the faceplate in the appropriate direction, and re-tighten the screws.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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says...

I agree with your first statements but the end is not completely correct - all the wiring is "analog", it's just that some carries the broadband RF signals as well as the up to 4Khz telephony signal.
With the Solwise ADSL-FFP85D filter the OP fitted, he could still install a master faceplate filter and run the unfiltered side from the new master faceplate to the Solwise filter and the filtered side to any other phone sockets. You can get master faceplate filters that have both filtered and unfiltered IDC connectors on the back e.g. http://www.adslnation.com/products/xte2005.php
There is no need for any filtered telephone wiring (your "analog wiring") to go to the Solwise. You simply wire through the unfiltered, combined broadband + telephony signal, wire (It's not "digital wiring", as you state) and the Solwise will split off the telephony part of the signal for local phones.
--
JohnW.
Replace the obvious with co.uk in 2 places to mail me.
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JohnW wrote:

The Solwise one does as well now - five terminals on the back: 2, 3, 5, A, & B
--
Cheers,

John.

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Sounds good. I may do this next. My only concern is playing with the existing extension wiring - it's pretty tight in the Master so not much room for error when stripping and re-clamping down in the new faceplate. I'll have to take a closer look.
In other news, some gentle filing has got the study extension box nice and level now, with no gashes. Just a case of tidying up the cable etc now.
Thanks,
Tris.
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snipped-for-privacy@extricate.org, in article <1177150083.097074.142680

Dont strip the wires when installing them into an IDC (Insulation Displacement Connector)... These are designed so that the IDC blades cut through the insulation and into the *single-core* wire core to form a gas-tight joint, that should have been cold-welded. If you are re-terminating wires, then you need to move the wire a mm or so further on from the end so the re-termination is at a different point in the wire.
Normally, wires should be long enough to allow 3 repairs, However, I have seen several that were "bar-tight" that required removing a few clamps to give enough slack.... Also, you may find that if the original wires were routed in through the back box, re-routing them directly to the front plate may give enough slack and also allow the (correct) removal of the faceplate to access the test socket whilst automatically disconnecting the house wiring. Just don't touch the two wires connected from the incoming line to the back box and ensure there are no other wires connected to these terminals.
One further point - if you do connect the unfiltered signal through to your study, then connect only *one* pair, normally to pins A and B on the back of the faceplate, to carry the signal - never connect the "pin 3" ring wire, since this provides a source of interference and isn't needed. The filter you install in your study will have an inbuilt ring capacitor to provide pin-3 ringing locally. Likewise, the master faceplate filter incorporates a ring capacitor for telephone sockets down-line of this filter, with their wires connected to pins 2, 3 and 5 on the faceplate filter.
--
JohnW.
Replace the obvious with co.uk in 2 places to mail me.
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Thanks for the info. The Solwise plate mentiond is nice in that it only has pins 2 and 5 for the incoming feed anyway (but allows 2, 3 and 5 to be connected if any daisy chaining is required).
Tris.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

If you wish to be pedantic, yes. But 'analog extension wiring' is a convenient way to describe wiring connected downstream of the filter, and intended for analog equipment. Likewise, 'digital extension wiring' is a convenient way to describe an unfiltered extension, intended for ADSL.

What you say is perfectly correct, and probably reasonable to do in the OP's case since he's installing new wiring. But in the general case, it defeats the object of using a filtered faceplate in the master socket which is to separate the signals as early as possible and eliminate any adverse effects which dodgy extension wiring may otherwise have on the ADSL signal.

Yes indeed - but in cases where there's any doubt about the quality of the extension wiring it's safer to run a *dedicated* unfiltered ('digital' in my parlance) extension just for ADSL. If you don't, there's little point in having a filtered faceplate in the master socket.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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On Sat, 21 Apr 2007 22:25:21 +0100, "Roger Mills"

Not neccesarily. Some extension wiring is in such a mess that spurious connections and wiring make ADSL unuasable whilst all the wiring is connected. A filtered faceplate means the ADSL only has to use one pair of one leg of this dubious wiring rather than bouncing up and down all of it. It can make a difference.
--
Regards,
Stuart.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Well ok - but you could confuse the hell out of anyone coming after you if you have filtered and unfiltered extension wiring from your filtered master faceplate, but the unfiltered is not dedicated to ADSL - but is carrying voice as well, and subequently separated by further downstream filters.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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On Sun, 22 Apr 2007 15:01:33 +0100, "Roger Mills"

It's not that difficult to work out if you know what you're doing. Once you whip the faceplate off you can soon see what's going on.

Yep, although I'll normally terminate unfiltered lines with RJ11 sockets to avoid confusion or fit the filtered extension sockets.
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snipped-for-privacy@extricate.org wrote:

If you loosen up the hole, you can hold the thing straight when you screw the front plate on - once tightened up it all clamps together.
If you have any visible gashes, take thefront off, repair and sand the plasterwork, and paint - you can paint over the box - and reapply the front plate.
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On Fri, 20 Apr 2007 19:21:13 +0100, Roger Mills wrote:

Both types are available:
http://www.solwise.co.uk/adsl_splitters.htm
Of course there is confusion caused by calling these things "ADSL filters" as the ADSL *isn't* filtered it is the analogue phone connections that are filtered.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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It's a bit more complicated if you want to use a metal box as they are normally set into solid plaster/brick, etc. But it can be done. Make up some wood battens slightly longer than the sides of the hole and glue to the back of the plasterboard lined up with the edge. You next need to drill some holes in the sides of the box as there won't be any in the right places. Then fix through these holes with screws into the wood battens. When you fix the front plate to this it will clamp together and be much stronger than a dry lining box - and neater looking too. If you have to decorate anyway you can use screws to hold the battens to the plasterboard - but best use brass screws for this job as steel will rust after being filled over.
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*It was recently discovered that research causes cancer in rats*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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