mole grips

Hello,
I see there are two types of mole grips: ones with straight jaws, and ones with curved jaws. Which is most useful or should you always have a pair of both in your toolbox? When do you use each type?
Thanks. Rob
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and
have
There are masses of variants of the Mole 'locking vice grip' style tool with jaws of every conceiveable shape. The straight parallel jaw variety, not suprisingly perhaps, would be used to grip things that have parallel sides, like a large nut or a square bar. Whereas the curved jaw style, again not suprisingly, would be used to grip curved things like a piece of iron gas barrel or a thick rod.
Don't confine yourself t!o those two shapes - Google Mole welding pliers
AWEM
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Andrew Mawson wrote:

Not quite. The straight jaws open and close about a pivot so are only parallel at one particular setting, about 15mm on mine.
The exception to this is the Stanley "Locking Adjustable Wrench" already mentioned by TMH <http://preview.tinyurl.com/zvrs7 .
--
Mike Clarke

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that
only
already
Absolutely not so Mike with genuine Moles, the jaw stays parallel - that's the whole point of them.
AWEM
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I've only got one old genuine Mole grip - and I'd be bereft without it ! (My others are all cheap imitations and all distort the first time you try to grip anything really tight.) My Mole's jaws do taper a bit, so they can grip quite thin things right at the tips of the jaws, but not further back. This I have found to be a useful feature, that is not shared on the imitations.
S
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On 22/09/2010 21:35, Andrew Mawson wrote:

I have a pair of early 60s Mole "Self-grip wrench". The moving jaw pivots around a single point and the straight jaws are only parallel when the opening is 7/8".
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 22:24:24 +0100, Roger Chapman

Likewise. In fact I've never seen a parallel-jawed version of either genuine Mole or "Chinese-copy" wrenches.
There's no necessity for parallel jaws. If the object to be gripped has parallel faces a "crescent wrench" or a simple adjustable (or fixed) spanner is appropriate - a "Mole Wrench" is really a rather crude tool to grab hold of round or randomly-shaped objects.
--
Frank Erskine

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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 00:04:19 +0100, Frank Erskine wrote:

============================================================================= Maybe they should be renamed as 'Crocodile' or 'Alligator' wrench, since that more generally describes their action, particularly the version with long straight jaws.
Cic.
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===============================================================================
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Cicero wrote:

Apparently the name comes from the original manufacturers who were Norman Mole & Co Ltd or something similar.
<Googles>
---------------------------------------------------------------------
An electrical engineer who during the Second World War was involved in the installation, inspection and maintenance of the 1,000-ton "Whale" floating roadways for the Mulberry Harbours through which Allied military supplies were brought ashore in Normandy to supply the invading armies after D-Day, Tom Coughtrie also earned the gratitude of many thousands of DIY enthusiasts after the war for his invention of the remarkable "Mole" self-grip wrench. In 1947 he became assistant to the joint managing directors - both brothers - of the Birmingham engineering company M. K. Mole and Son, which had been founded in 1835. After the deaths of the two Mole brothers, in 1948 and 1950 respectively, he became managing director. He had already been working on his idea for a self-grip wrench and in 1955 his remarkable device was patented, and did much to underpin the fortunes of Mole and Sons. In 1960 the company relocated to Newport, Monmouthshire, then an area of high unemployment, and Coughtrie invented the slogan "Ship through Newport, the home of the Mole Wrench". Mole exported its lockable pliers to 60 countries and while the financial benefits came to Coughtrie through the company, the firm did sufficiently well to allow the inventor-manager to own his own Rolls Royce.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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On 23 Sep, 19:15, "The Medway Handyman" <davidl...@no-spam- blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

Except the septics were 20 years ahead of him, patent had hit expiry, `fraid Vise Grip, now owned by Irwin , wins this one
http://www.asktooltalk.com/articles/toolhistory/vise-grip.php
Vise Grip make a handy mauled hex attacker profile:
http://www.irwin.com/tools/locking-tools/the-original-locking-wrenches
Think Stanley now own the Mole brand. Cheap ones really aren`t worth the skinned knuckles.
Cheers Adam
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Adam Aglionby wrote:

Are Mole grips & Vice Grips that same thing? Do Vice Grips have that machanical advantage of do they just lock?
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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On 24 Sep, 00:40, "The Medway Handyman" <davidl...@no-spam- blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

Pretty much identical :
http://www.toolfastdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Locking_Pliers.html
Swan wins the lightbulb but looks like Newport Home of Mole was pure genius , of the marketing kind.
Cheers Adam
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 16:56:49 -0700, Adam Aglionby wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------
============================================================================= The name 'Mole grip' or 'Mole wrench' has been used generically for many years in the same way that 'Hoover' is used generically for vacuum cleaners so nobody is really too bothered about the accuracy of the name.
As a tool I've always found its best use is as a clamp for welding etc. rather than as a spanner or pair of pliers. I've just made a temporary knock-down shed from surplus angle iron and used only two Mole wrenches and a couple of 'G-clamps' to hold things together for drilling.
Where a spanner is needed a proper true fitting spanner is best for most purposes rather a mole grip or an adjustable.
Cic.
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===============================================================================
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Only in the UK oer where Mole exported. Vice Grips is the more common, and original USA term

Apart from the smooth jaw versions, which took around 60 years to be introduced after the first invention.
The serrated jaws versions are what they are, a vice like grip, not for undoing nuts.
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"Vice Grips" (with a c) are a cheap Chinese knock-off brand and really poor. "Vise Grip" (with an s, and singular) are the genuine US article and just as good (probably stronger) than Moles.
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On Sep 24, 12:40am, "The Medway Handyman" <davidl...@no-spam- blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

The Mole is a much-improved version, with, in particular, a very easy- to-operate release lever. The real Mole ones, before the Stanley takeover, are much to be preferred to the American Vise Grips.
John
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On 23/09/2010 23:42, Adam Aglionby wrote:

I've bought a dirt cheap set of 3 in the 70s. Still going strong and have got me out of more scrapes than I care to remember.
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The _really_cheap Moles were the '80s ones, in bright '80s primary colours instead of being plated. Still worked well though.
If you want weird though. I've got a pair of beryllium copper ones (not Mole) - sparkproof, for the petrochemical industry.
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I bought a cheap set, of varying sizes, from Aldi or Lidl. Great for general use.
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Quality versions were VERY expensive. They were for engineering and mechanical work. Pipe fitters had little need for them. The smooth jaws versions are now invaluable for pipe fitting.
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