Lighting for workshop

In my indoor workshop I currently have two quite old (20 years +) flourescent light fittings, with a single 40 watt tube in each. They are starting to get a bit temperamental at starting, and buzz quite a lot.
I'm thinking about replacing them with LED strips something like these (link will split across lines):
http://www.ledhut.co.uk/led-strip-lights/spashproof-ip44/led-strip-splashproof-ip44-60-large-high-power-led-chips-per-metre-5-metre-roll.html
in cool white.
Do you think they will be ok as replacements for the tubes? I guess I'll have to go for the 100w transformer.
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Davidm wrote:

As all the light from LEDs will shine downwards, whatever reflector you have on the old lights won't do much, the light pattern you get might not reach as far laterally as with the tubes.
Alibaba prices will be under 1/4 LEDhut's prices if you can afford to wait for delivery from China/Hong Kong.
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I'd want decent colour rendering in a workshop, and I'm pretty certain no reasonably priced LEDs will do this. Also, LEDs are a tiny light source so you'd need lots and lots of them to give an even light.
I'd go for some modern decent florries. With tubes suitable for your use - rather than basic. Electronic ballast florries don't suffer from starting problems on a cold day.
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The product spec is missing the colour temperature and CRI. (Warm White and Cool White are not good enough descriptions.) That's usually left out of the spec when the product is crap, but it could just be the retailer's incompetence. OTOH, workshops are not normally as critical as house lighting for these factors.

The claimed light output is more than 2x36W tubes, and because it's all directed downwards, the light output should appear to be significantly more than you had before.

I would not expect any problem with 4' tubes starting cold. It was only a problem with the 8' tubes. Bare fluorescent tubes are significantly less efficient in the cold though, and they'll take longer to run up to final light output.
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I disagree (no surprise there ;-)). Decent lighting is probably more important in a DIY workshop than in most parts of the average house. Except, perhaps, the kitchen.
Of course it depends on what you do DIY wise.
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Yes I had a pair of much shorter tubes that flashed away on cold days, but grabbing them with a warm hand for a few seconds made them work, so they were just too cold. I have to say from friends who have tried leds, if you can do without the off axis light they are much brighter thann tubes, but if you want all around light I suspect they are not going to be much good. Brian
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A problem with all LEDs. They look bright to the eye but the light they throw on the work is what matters. Which is why florries are such a good choice for workshops - a large area which isn't too bright to look at directly.
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wrote:

Not necessarily.

Yes, but its actually easier to put light where its needed with LED strip lights which can be much easier to have where they are needed and you don’t have a relatively massive light fitting as you do with fluoros.
Main problem is that LEDs arent as easy to change when they die.

But much worse where you need local light with a lathe, pedestal drill or cut off saw etc.
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wrote:

If the LEDs do the same job then what is the problem?
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wrote:

He's claiming that they don't, or at least don't do the same job for the same price.

That LEDs aren't anything like as cheap when they fail as fluoros which normally just need a cheap new tube.
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On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 at 11:01:33 PM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

,
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od

Thanks for the ideas guys. I do subscribe to the traditional florries in m y workshops, but then I got 2 double 6 ft HF units out of a skip - I've had to replace one of the electronic modules but the cost of the tubes is pret ty insignificant, and the lighting great.
I recently bought a 5m roll of LED lighting off Ebay for a fiver to light t he larder and do the work-top lighting. Strips of LEDs under each larder s helf has been a major success, and I'm hoping there and over the worktop li ghts will last longer than the small florries I had before.
I'm not sure I could use the more powerful strip for the kitchen but the pa nel does attract me.
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Mine are even older than that, getting over 40 years old now and don’t have either problem.

I bet the LedHut one does, but its very arguable if those are reasonably priced.

The strip LEDs have that in spades, 60 per meter in fact. http://www.ledhut.co.uk/led-strip-lights/spashproof-ip44/led-strip-splashproof-ip44-60-large-high-power-led-chips-per-metre-5-metre-roll.html

Dunno. One in the kitchen is very awkward to change the tubes or starters in because of where it is and I have been considering replacing it with LED strips like the above.
Not keen on the price, but that may be silly given how much hassle it is to change the tubes etc and how much easier it would be to attach the LED strip to the ceiling.
> With tubes suitable for your use - rather than basic.

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On 21/12/2015 19:17, Rod Speed wrote:

I've seen it recommended with the higher power LED strips that ideally they should first be mounted to a aluminium strip heat-sink before fitting.
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That would work well in my case because I would use an inverted U channel of aluminium just to produce something that is easy to attach to the ceiling in one piece. Not sure how you mount this heatsink wise tho.
http://www.ledhut.co.uk/led-strip-lights/spashproof-ip44/led-strip-splashproof-ip44-60-large-high-power-led-chips-per-metre-5-metre-roll.html
Basically the same price as the other one you mentioned, http://www.ledhut.co.uk/commercial-led-lighting/led-panel-lights/20-watt-high-output-300-x-300-led-panel-1477.html and more than twice the lumens and would be better mechanically for my kitchen bench because it could extend right down both very long benches, one for each.
Not ideal compared with yours tho, I get quite a bit of fat on the ceiling from grilling steaks and yours would be a lot easier to clean. Much more expensive tho because I would presumably need at least 4 of yours and just one of the other LED strips for the kitchen.
4 of yours would be twice the lumens again tho.
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On 21/12/2015 12:58, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

The 20W daylight LED 300mm x 300mm panels I have give a good _even_ lighting in a 2.5m x 2.5m x 2.7m room. Since fitting the light I have spent many hours DIY in this room and find the light levels ideal, even for 'fiddly' work.
http://www.ledhut.co.uk/commercial-led-lighting/led-panel-lights/20-watt-high-output-300-x-300-led-panel-1477.html but probably cheaper elsewhere
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So how many do you have in that room ?

Sounds like it might be ideal for my kitchen.

Yeah, the price is a bit of a worry, particularly if it doesn’t last all that long after the warranty runs out. That's the big plus with the current fluoros, costs peanuts for a new tube every decade or so.
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On 22/12/2015 19:41, Rod Speed wrote:

1 off 300mm x 300mm panel ceiling (surface) mounted
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On 21/12/15 11:40, Davidm wrote:

I see "5000 lumens" in the spec which is very good. You can also bandy the strips around a bit to get perhaps a more even lighting if you want.
One query - do you want "warm white" or would you be better with a cool white for that type of use?
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2015 16:31:47 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

Bit cheaper and would replace the existing tubes, not as high an output, 4100K (which I find evry good) http://ledlam.co.uk/shop/ledlam-t8-8ft-2400mm-40w-led-tube
"High Brightness ( 3400lm ), 90W Replacement – 56% Energy Saving, Low Power Consumption ( 40W ) – 5 Year! Guarantee, Long lifespan ( over 30.000 hours ), CE, RoHS – Cool-Day – Colour Temperature, High CRI (over 80) – High Quality, High Brightness Epistar 200x SMD2835 LED Chip – Rotatble end caps with +90° or -90°"
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Why now just swap the tubes for LED tubes and bypass the ballast?
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