Kettle descalent

I live in a soft water area. The other day I took a peek inside my kettle and was disgusted. I ordered the below. ?2.27. Okay, I did give it a few blasting, but the insides of my kettle are now spotless. https://www.ebay.co.uk/p/Oust-Kettle-Descaler-75g/2142276582?iid#2844718053
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On 19/09/2018 16:44, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

Were in North Essex - hardest water on the planet. We use Astonish All purpose descaler in our kettle - shifts scale in next to no time. Get 5 goes out of a 1 litre bottle - about £1 from Savers, QD stores, the range etc. All Astonish products are excellent value for money - and work!
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Andy Bennet wrote:

I've used the Pound shop descaler in the past. The results were very poor. A couple of quid has saved me going out to buy a new kettle.
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Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

I got a tub of citric acid crystals for this (we deduced that that was what is in the descaler sachets). I'm pretty sure it's more economical, and it looks like it will last for years.
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On 19/09/2018 17:01, Dan S. MacAbre wrote:

Yep pretty much the stuff that is in the Astonish descaler. Not sure if buying the crystals is any cheaper or worth the faff.
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On 19/09/2018 17:05, Andy Bennet wrote:

I use citric acid crystals, too. I buy Kgs at a time, and it's not expensive. One advantage is that it's food grade, so I know it doesn't matter if I don't rinse it completely, apart from the drinks maybe tasting a bit odd. (I like lemon tea, anyway!)
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GB wrote:

coffee machine manufacturers seem to recommend (or sell own brand) descalers that are lactic acid rather than citric acid based, maybe they have to worry about the O-rings?
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Andy Bennet wrote:

I have used Astonish car shampoo in the past and have been quite pleased with the shine. Still, my five year cheap kettle is now spotless for ?2.27. I'm happy with that.
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On 19/09/2018 17:38, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

Sainsburys are selling Purple kettles for only about £12.
Strangely, identical lime green or red ones are £22.
Work that one out.
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Easy, hardly anyone buys purple ones so they want to get rid of those.
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On 20/09/2018 19:34, 543dsa wrote:

Then, why did Sainsburys order them in the first place ?.
Until they are in store and on sale, they don't know what fickle decisions the customers will make.
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Buyers often make silly choices.
My wife and I wanted a bog-standard white plastic jug type of kettle, so we went to a large John Lewis store. No chance! However, they had what must have been around 50 different designs of kettle - all 'futuristic', bulky, expensive and as ugly as hell - the sort of thing that I can't see many people wanting to buy. In the end, we got exactly what we wanted for ?12 at Sainsburys (white - not purple!).
--
Ian

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Because some do buy those.

More accurately, they don’t know what percentage of purple ones will be bought and when they discover that they sell fewer of those than they expected, they discount those to get rid of the excess.
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On 19/09/2018 16:44, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

On holiday a couple of years ago, I found the kettle badly furred up. My son didn't like the taste of tea made with the tap water, so I used bottled water and flakes of limescale came off in the water a number of times, so I decided to clean it out.
All I had to hand was vinegar. I put some in, boiled it, emptied it out, rinsed a number of times and ended up with a beuatifully clean element.
I don't know if something has changed since then, but we have been back a number of times and, up to three weeks ago, it has stayed clean.
SteveW
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Steve Walker wrote:

I have tried vinegar in the past on other kettles. It did not work very well. As this is a diy group I was trying to be helpful and I do not think that ?2.27 delivered is not being helpful.
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On 19/09/2018 21:30, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

I have a can of oust which I bought from the hardware stall on our market some years ago. Use it on kettles and irons and still have some. That stall seems to just have sachets now.
--
Old Codger
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On 19/09/2018 21:30, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

In the one case I have tried it it worked well - I haven't needed it otherwise as we live in an area with extremely soft water.

I was definitely not accusing you of not being helpful, merely suggesting an alternative that had worked for me, using materials that I had to hand at the time and that other people likely have in the cupboard.
SteveW
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One of the best tools for minimising the deposition of scale in the first place is the ball of 'stainless steel wire wool'. <https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Kettle-Descaler-Limescale-Removal-Prevent-Fur ring-Scale-Fur-Remover-S-Steel-Wire-/253683465144> They last essentially for ever. Every week or so, to wash off the scale that has formed on it, take it out of the kettle and crunch it up while rinsing it under running water - or, to avoid the bits of scale going into the drains, in a bowl of water which you then can tip out somewhere in the garden. Then put it back. This way, the kettle only needs a light de-scale every three or four months.
--
Ian

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On Wed, 19 Sep 2018 23:13:34 +0100, Ian Jackson wrote:

I'd want to be sure that it didn't contain lead. Some 'free-cutting' stainless steels have lead to lubricate the tool, so a large surface area exposed to the water could be A Bad Thing.
As an aside, apparently there's some concern in the USA over lead in water that's been inside stainless steel taps overnight. I always run off a drop at first use - never know what might have crawled up there.
--
Peter.
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While stainless steel obviously contains various additional elements, I have no reason to believe that these 'wire wool' scale preventers contain lead. They have been available for decades, and are exceeding effective (certainly not snake oil). I would expect questions would be being asked if there was any suspicion that they were a health risk.

--
Ian

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