Just one Leyland tree - not a hedge

It's been v. interesting to see all the experience here about Leylandii hedges. I'd be very thankful to hear anyone's experience with how to manage a single Leyland tree. It is young and I want to know how to look after it. It is doing a single screening job. It's not quite as tall yet as we'd like but will be this year. Already the width is fine as it is. What would be the pruning policy you can recommend? Also, I've looked for an image of what the roots of a single tree do. Does anyone know of an drawing to look at onlline? Thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Feb 2017 14:14:04 +0000, M. Goddard wrote:

Trim it a couple of times a year once it has reached the size you want it to be.
*Never* cut back into 'brown wood' as it will not regrow from there - it only grows from the green.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sounds reasonable
AJH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, February 27, 2017 at 2:47:48 PM UTC, Mark Allread wrote:

It bloody well will grow back. We have a neighbours hedge consisting of 17 ft high leyleandii which we couldn't top as it was a march hedge. When he f inally faced his side back to the trunk I took the opportunity to top it, T hat was a good few years back and the tops all grew back.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Never heard of a march hedge. What is it?
Certainly, tops will grow; actually not the tops of the trunks as such, but upper branches will turn up and start growing skywards at a rate. The tops of the lengthy Leylandii hedge here when we bought the place would grow at least 4ft every year, requiring a major operation annually to cut it back. Yes, I should have cut it more frequently, probably three times a year, but it was awkward to get at and took a lot of time and effort. I eventually took it out.
But lower down, on the faces of the hedge, cutting the green outer bits back into the brown dross behind is asking for permanent dead areas.
If the OP is prepared to devote time and effort to trimming his tree several times a year, doesn't mind a rather uninteresting specimen tree, and isn't concerned as to what may happen in the future, that's fine. Me, I'd plant something different.
The OP also asked about root-spread. This may be helpful http://tinyurl.com/h2c5955 From the diagram about half way down, you will see that pines and spruces can safely be planted between 5 and 10 metres from a building even if they're allowed to grow to full size. I would think closer if kept short.
Some general tips here http://tinyurl.com/j7xlfj6
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/17 14:14, M. Goddard wrote:

Leylandii?
Or does your tree go on strike every 6 months?
Seriously - uk.rec.gardening will know :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Feb 2017 14:56:46 +0000

I wonder if this is a case of uncorrected auto-correct?
--
Davey.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Er...what's wrong with 'Leylandii'? It's what they're called...
To the OP: I'd go all round it with a grub-axe or sharp spade, cutting down through the roots as far as I could. Then I'd cut under it as best I could, get a crow-bar under it and lever it out. Then cut it into small pieces that will either go through your shredder, or if you haven't got a shredder, small enough to fit in the car to take it to your local dump, sorry, recycle centre.
Then go out and buy something a bit more appropriate for the site, that won't grow so fast, won't need trimming twice a year, won't be a boring plain green and won't look ugly after three years having had to have its top cut out. Your local garden centre will have several alternatives that are infinitely preferable to a Leylandii as feature plants; ask the staff.
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/2017 15:34, Chris Hogg wrote:

Nothing. Have a look at how it's spelt (spelled) in the thread title and in the case above.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nothing wrong with that either: Leyland cypress, Cypressus x leylandii or × Cuprocyparis leylandii are what it's called, common and botanical names. http://tinyurl.com/jue8xd3
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/2017 16:18, Chris Hogg wrote:

Didn't know that, but I never said Leyland was wrong I was more alluding to the explanation of Tim's joke
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, February 27, 2017 at 4:07:55 PM UTC, soup wrote:

Leyland is the singular name after Capt Charles Leyland who propogated them at Haggerston Castle, now a crarvan site.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/2017 21:17, Adam Aglionby wrote:

Brother and his family went there for a holiday (Haven) all I can remeber is his two girls raving about some bear mascot thing (Bradley).
Anyway more apropos this thread:- Didn't know any of that , but I never said Leyland was wrong I was more alluding to an explanation of Tim's joke
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/17 15:34, Chris Hogg wrote:

"Leyland" in the subject line...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

My reply to Soup, which you've obviously not read. Pity, but no matter:
"Nothing wrong with that either: Leyland cypress, Cypressus x leylandii or × Cuprocyparis leylandii are what it's called, common and botanical names. http://tinyurl.com/jue8xd3 "
Any gardener would immediately know what is meant by a Leyland tree.
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/17 19:54, Chris Hogg wrote:

Never heard that, but I'll take the correction.
I thought my joke was still good though - which is what it was :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/2017 20:40, Tim Watts wrote:

Must have been a different branch of British Layland?
(Sorry, will get my coat and leaf!) ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/02/2017 14:14, M. Goddard wrote:

You can 'clip' them to limit spread and trim the top (I call it the leader but that probably isn't the correct term).
The problem arises when they get too tall to do yourself. We've just had two taken down which, in the past, we've had 'topped' several times over the years professionally. (They have always been too high to reach without my wife panicing I would fall.) In the end, we decided enough was enough. The bill ran to about £500 so it is worth keeping them under control.
--

Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've used them for garden hedging. Annual side and top and they are nearly as good as Yew.

--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 Feb 2017 17:53:37 +0000, Tim Lamb

Except when you forget to trim them for a year or two, the yew can be cut back.
IMO western red cedar makes a nicer hedge than Lawsons or Leyland cypress.
AJH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.