Insulating single skinned brick garage.

I want to batten the walls and install some insulation, but I want to make sure it's rodent resistant/proof.
Probably use exterior grade osb on the inside, but what insulation to use ? rockwool or Glass fibre mat ?
What would mice etc not like to nest in is probably the query.
Also need to insulate an up and over garage door, what's best to stick on here. Clearly I won't be skinning it over with wood due to excess weight. How about around the edges where the gaps are ?
Thanks
Paul.
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On 26 Sep 2005 08:45:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com wrote:

I had hedgehogs nest in a pile of rockwall I had stacked in the garden.
Celotex/Kingspan will weigh very little added to the door.
Rick
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On 26 Sep 2005 08:45:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com wrote:

I have a recipe for all of this which I've posted a few times, Paul.
My garage has a pitched, trussed, felted roof.
Roof === 50mm Celotex attached to rafters using long drywall screws with washers to spread fixing area. Joints taped with foil tape. Leaves ventilation gap behind.
Fitted vents to soffits.
Ceiling level ============ Boarded over joists with T&G floorboards apart from one area with liftable hatch and a loft type folding ladder. This provides storage area above work area which is dry but prevents heat from rising too quickly from heated work area.
Floor ==== Treated with epoxy floor paint system. One coat of primer mix and two of finish.
Walls ==== Created stud frames and bolted bottom plates to floor through DPC material and fastened to rafters at top. 15mm air gap behind. Filled frame with 50mm Celotex. Clad with 18mm WBP ply to allow fixings to be made anywhere.
Doors ==== Cut and fitted 50mm Celotex to doors using Gripfill. Fitted vinyl weather strips to all gaps by sandwiching strip between lengths of hardwood (treated) and self tap screwing to edges of doors.
Heating ====== From house system via stainless steel heat exchanger with primary controlled by a zone valve and separate pump on secondary circuit. Secondary system filled with antifreeze corrosion inhibitor to prevent secondary freezing when system off for extended period.
Net result is that space that needed 12kW to heat and in practice got 6kW max, can be heated to 18 degrees at any time of year quite cheaply using about 3kW. I have about 7kW of radiator capacity deliberately done to be able to raise the temperature quickly if wanted. It's usable at any time now, whereas before it was a miserable experience.
I could have gone a step further and made an insulated floor, but I didn't want to lose the height or have a ramp; plus I have a woodworking combination machine weighing around a tonne, so floor would have needed to be quite substantial.
--

.andy

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[snip loads of fine detailed sound advice]

I bet your house is the opposite to those featured on DIY SOS, Andy! Everything shipshape - but you still have loads of DIY dreams and plans to mull over.
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I wish it was. Plenty of ideas, but never enough time to implement all of them.
--

.andy

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Andy Hall wrote:

<snip goodstuff>
Thanks Andy,
This is something I look at every year, just when the first cold snap hits ;-)
I think the walls and door are priority #1 as it'll give me the best return on time investment.
"15mm air gap behind. Filled frame with 50mm Celotex."
Hmm, where's the air gap ?
So, batten the floor too then when framing ? not just put the board down to floor level ? The floor is concrete.
Cheers,
Paul.
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On 27 Sep 2005 02:18:27 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com wrote:

Yep. For me it was wanting to go out and spend sometimes short periods doing something and it taking ages to warm the place up.

Yes. The doors definitely first. If you have a steel or wooden (e.g. ply with timber frame) door, then the U value will be very high.
After that, it's walls and roof. Doing the roof was fiddly because of cutting shapes to fit the spaces and getting them into place. The walls were fairly quick.

As you look at the wall, imagine a timber frame constructed from 75x50mm timber. It is fastened to the joists at the top and floor at the bottom and is spaced off 15mm from the wall at the back. 50mm Celotex is interference fitted into the frame and seams are taped with foil tape. The result is a 15mm gap between the back of the frame and Celotex assembly and the wall. This is open to the soffit vents and gives ventilation of the inner face of the wall and up behind the roof insulation as well.
The front face of the frames have 18mm ply fitted to it and then painted to reflect as much light as possible. I can fix most things directly to the ply, but heavy items such as my dust extractor (75kg) can be fitted directly to the studs.

I didn't do the floor. I calculated that doing so would have saved about 1kW of heating (reduced 3-4kW down to about 2.5kW. However, I didn't want to lose the height because the ceiling joists are only at 2440mm above the floor. Added to this, I would have had to use quite a lot of timber to support the woodworking machinery - combination machine weighing around 1000kg.
However, if it were to be used for something like a games room etc. then I would have done the floor. Nevertheless, the floor is never a problem in terms of feeling cold.
--

.andy

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Andy Hall wrote:

I'd like to do it with ply, but I think that'll be a lot more expensive than OSB. Why did you choose Ply over MDF, OSB or Chipboard ?

Sorry, I wasn't clear, I mean put the framing horizontally, as well as vertically. I can batten the wall directly as it's brick, so quite easy to plug and screw to, but I was toying with the idea of not putting a horizontal batten on the floor. maybe I should and put a piece of DPC under it.

This is a garage, so it'll have to stay conctrete on the floor incase I put the car in to work on ..

Any ideas where I can get some of that industrial rubber lattice mat they use in workshops at a reasonable price. I think if i'm off the floor by the workbench it won't feel quite so cold on the feet.
Paul.
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On 30 Sep 2005 03:37:52 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@technologist.com wrote:

Quality, strength and longevity, really. Although the garage does not have damp issues, I was not enthusiastic about using chipboard or MDF for deterioration and strength reasons. Possibly OSB would be a reasonable second choice after ply.

I made rectangular frames with pieces projecting vertically to attach to the joists. I put DPC material under the horizontal parts of the frames at the bottom and bolted through them into the floor. I didn't want to fix frames to the wall at all to allow ventilation behind.

OK. I don't use the garage for cars at all. They belong outside AFAIAC and car repairers can work on them :-)
Using a good quality epoxy floor paint has been well worthwhile.

Mr Grunff helped me here. Horse mats are moderately inexpensive, relatively speaking
http://www.sovereign-rubber.co.uk /
I didn't want to use the lattice type because it is a PITA to clean sawdust etc. out of it.

--

.andy

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