How many plug sockets?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/6705313.stm A three-bedroom house built today must have at least 38 sockets, more than twice as many as 30 years ago. This is set by the National House Building Council's technical standards - revised up last year from 21 sockets - which cover more than 80% of new homes built in the UK.
How many sockets do you have? (We have 68 in a 4 bed)
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48 IIRC (10 in the computer room alone)
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On Tue, 01 Jan 2008 14:29:41 +0000, Colin Wilson wrote:

39 3 bed house. Wiring about 25 years old with some extras.
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On 01/01/2008 14:07 Mogga wrote:

84, also in 4 bedroom house. You can't have too many!
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On 01/01/2008 14:54 F wrote:

In the interests of transparency/accuracy, that's counting a double as two.
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80, but it's 5 bed. (and 27 UTP sockets for the network)
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Jeezz.. I thought our 24 was enough!..seems not!...

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Is that counting doubles as 1 or 2?
I've got 22 in a 1990 3 bed house, mostly doubles, a few singles, and a triple. About 7 of these were added by me, and there are some places where it could do with more when I get round to it.
In a 3 bed house I rewired in 2000, there are 25, mostly doubles. That's about twice as many as it had originally (which I believe conformed to the Parker Morris standard, as that was a condition of the grant which payed for the original rewire in the early 1970's, according to the paperwork I got). The NHBC basically took over the original Parker Morris standards, although they were aimed at social/council housing originally.
In the US (some states at least), there's a rule along the lines (can't recall exact details)... An appliance with a 6' power cord must be able to be positioned anywhere around the edge of the room and plugged in, without the cord crossing any doorway. I quite like that idea.
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from snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) contains these words:

True and it's good. However whether you can actually USE the said appliance in the said receptacle is another question completely. No ring circuits in the US and with the low voltage it doesn't take much to use up the available current from a radial circuit to the point at which the circuit breaker trips at the panel in the basement.
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writes:

it's individual sockets. so a double is 2.
tim
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83 - 4bed house
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words:

20 in a three bedroom. Most of them have been changed to double sockets, and there's a couple of 'trebles'. This house was built in 1948.
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contains these

You got lucky. The 1950's house that I first rented had 1 single socket in each bedroom, 2 singles in the living room and 2 singles (plus one on the cooker switch, as was normal then) in the kitchen. Even if all the singles were changed to doubles there would still only be 15.
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How about how many not having something permanently plugged in?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Mogga wrote:

My mother's house, built in 1968 with NHBC, had 7 singles, including the cooker point. The smallest bedroom had none.
Anyway, aren't they plugs, and the things you plug into them are plugtops?
Owain
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Owain wrote:

No they're sockets, or socket-outlets in formal BS 7671-speak. (Cue '60s BBC2: "it might be a plug to you, but it's a socket-to-me" boom boom.)

"Plug-top" has become common industry parlance for "plug" but AIUI it originally referred to the body of the plug containing the terminals and fuse (if any), but excluding the external pins.
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@stirlingcity.coo.uk says...

When we lived in Hounslow the old dear up the road had the original electricity company "minimum installation" - two sockets and two lights, IIRC. She had a flying lead running to upstairs to power a bedside lamp and that was it. She also had an outside toilet. The up-side to all this was she had a peppercorn rent.
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and how many three bedroom houses do you know with a kitchen AND a utility room AND two reception rooms?
OK no doubt there are some, but the normal little box does not.
Anyway, I have 8 in the living room, 4 in the kitchen (not counting the under worktop ones that the washers are permanently wired into), 6 in the master and 4 in the second bedroom. And none in the hallway which makes vacuuming it a bugger.
tim
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wrote:

Ah. Forgot the two in the hallway. 82.
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Err... This one has. But then it's an 1830s twin fronted terraced house, and probably doesn't count as a 'normal little box'.

32 doubles here = 64 sockets (I see elsethread that 1 x double = 2)
And yes, there are useful sockets in the hall (including 1 under the stairs for the colour laser printer that SWMBO hates (too big, doesn't match the decor) and soon my newly acquired NAS) and on the landing. But the number excludes the 3 doubles in the shed, not to mention the 30A outlet for the kiln and the assorted dedicated FCUs around the place...
We had the electrics revamped as part of the renovation - the power circuits were radial, so the ring final circuits are new, as is the submain out to the shed. The sparky who did the work said he'd never seen so many sockets in a small house...
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