Heavy Duty Toilet Seat?

hey up! have a very busy household and am getting through toilet seats quiet regularly. they all seem to be quiet loose fitting and plasticy. have spent 30 quid on supposedly heavy use ones, but even they come loose eventually! anyone know where i can get heavy duty ones?
ta
Steve
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Those £13 wooden ones from B&Q are OK. I assume you mean the seat is plasticy. The wooden seat is less of a shock on a winter morning too - takes about 3 seconds to feel warm. Try to get ones with metal nusts and bolts though - I am scared to really tighten the plastic nut one I bought.
Bob
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r.p.mcmurphy wrote:

If the problem is the plastic hinge housing breaking because the plastic bolt has stretched and come loose, get an M4 coach bolt to use instead - put a bath tap washer and a penny washer (in that order) between the bowl and the nut to avoid cracking the bowl. You may have to file flats on the head of the coach bolt to make it fit in the hinge. I used this system on toilets in a charity shop (with heavyweight assistants)an it lasted for 3 years before the hinge broke. It does rist solid quite quicklt so the only way of removing the seat is to break the hinge!
Malcolm
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loose
Per the above; instead of galv. or black metal coach bolts use stainless. That's what we use for example to fasten our toilet to the floor because the toilet pipe flange is damaged and they remain usable for years.
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On Sunday, January 09, 2005 4:07 PM [GMT+1ÎT], you wrote:

I can endorse this method - I had to fit a padded seat for my very ill partner and though it was expensive and hard-to-get, it was flimsy and the fittings were junk. They broke after a couple of weeks' use by two skinny people. I could have demanded a refund but there wasn't any other type available.
I used coachbolts, flats filed as above with an angle grinder, then the plastic nuts from the original fittings locked on with metal nuts. Instead of penny washers I used layers of that anti-slip stuff for rugs, cut to size. I also glued anti-slip to the flat part of the hinges where it met the bowl.
One reason it broke was because the seat tended to rotate on the fixings. I sorted that by gluing more anti-slip material to the feet of the seat (where it rests on the bowl). It's lasted two months so far, sits solid and is better than new.
I don't need a padded seat any more. :(
But it'll stay there until it breaks. It should be readily removable; all the modifications are to the seat itself.
HTH
Gill
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"r.p.mcmurphy" snipped-for-privacy@SPACEntlworld.com says...

Why not use a hardwood seat with brass fittings?
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says...

they keep coming loose. suppose i cud try tread locking them and siliconing them to the bowl to reduce possibility of movement.
Steve
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Is the household in general "heavy duty"?
Anyway, I've found that if you can make up spacers so that the fittings are held not by the clamps on the top, and free to wobble back and forth, but by the screws in between them, then it works quite well.
I warmed the cistern slowly to 40C or so by pointing an electric heater at it, then partially assembled the fixings, filled the holes with hot-melt glue, and then finished the fixings.
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"Ian Stirling" snipped-for-privacy@mauve.demon.co.uk says...

I'd have suggested epoxy, but probably much the same effect.
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<snip>
Epoxy is better - if you have no doubts about ever wanting to remove it. Hot-melt will be lots easier if you ever do.
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r.p.mcmurphy wrote:

Is this your bowels?

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Rob Morley wrote:

Just an aside on the hardwood seat front. Beware using them on some cistern/seat sets. Mine only JUST reaches the vertical, and as a result tends to drop the seat just when a chap doesn't need that sort of distraction! I wonder how long before it breaks the pan...
Andrew
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com says...

Self-adhesive velcro might make a worthwhile safety catch :-)
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says...

loose
You can get that effect if you put the "circular hinge base thingies" the wrong way around. The hinge ends up too close to the cistern.
Bob
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r.p.mcmurphy wrote:

Sand cast iron ones in a local foundry.
That should see you right.
Don't let it fall down when you are kneeling in front of it though.

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Try....
http://www.pressalitgroup.com/index.html?language=eng
These people are a Danish company and are one of the biggest toilet seat manufacturers in Europe. They have a UK office (see Dealer list on website). I do know that their seats are used by many 'heavy duty' installations (eg motorway service stations, hospitals, etc.). I have one at home and it is the 'Rolls-Royce' of toilet seats. Cheers, Jase
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