Hanging a top-hinged window

I have to hang a wooden window casement. Is that the right word for the part of the window that opens and closes? This one is top hinged, and I think it's quite hard to do on my own. Essentially, the window needs to be held at right angles whilst the hinges are screwed in.
Any tips for doing this? Is it easier to fit the hinge to the window first or the frame first?
I suspect that what I need is a mate on a ladder outside holding the window whilst I screw it into place, but my son who usually helps me is busy, and I am trying to work out whether it's feasible to do this single-handed?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GB wrote:

uPVC rather than wooden, but I found these air wedges made fitting windows (other than the heaviest two) a one-man job.
<http://www.axminster.co.uk/winbag-air-wedges-ax649735
Probably difficult to justify for a single window, though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, 5 June 2016 22:02:07 UTC+1, GB wrote:

Wait until he's available. If it falls there will be a lot of damage (assume it's first floor.) Not worth the risk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/06/2016 22:02, GB wrote:

Casement really just means hinged at the sides. The moving bit is called the sash.

That makes it an awning window then...

What kind of hinges are you using? Traditional "door style" ones or modern pantograph ones?

Its usually easier to fit them to the sash first, then use that to mark the position of the hinge mortices (if required).

You could make up some large L brackets out of timber, that you could then clamp to the frame verticals, creating a horizontal "shelf" protruding outside the window. Positioned a few inches below the hinge position they could fully support the window in a near horizontal position leaving you free to work on the hinges.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2016 9:35 AM, John Rumm wrote:

Yes, that would work (even upstairs). Or use a square or rectangle of say 12 mm ply or sterling board cut along the diagonal to make two triangles. You could screw these temporarily to the window frame uprights, just leaving four holes to fill and paint afterwards. With this method the horizontal edge would line up nicely with the frame of the sash.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 6 Jun 2016 09:35:18 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

I didn't know that term, always referred to it as "transom".

A few years ago I was buying hinges for uPVC windows and found out that the 'top-hung' have the hinges at the sides, i.e. for awning or transom and that the 'side-hung' have the hinges top and bottom!
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/06/2016 16:46, PeterC wrote:

IIUC A transom is a windows above another opening - typically a door or another window. aka a fanlight window. (it is often top hung, but does not have to be)

Yup, uPVC hinges are actually quite difficult to match up exactly - many look the same, but there are subtle differences.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Timber frames normally use cranked hinges and you can screw them up without opening them out completely. If the opener is small you can probably just hold it in position while you get the first couple of screws in. Anything l arger will require support i.e. A mate outside or a temporary support on th e inside.
Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 6 Jun 2016 17:24:15 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

Mine are about 25 yo now and the hinges are 13mm wide. I couldn't get any when some broke (the plastic slider with the friction screw split and the whole lot goes titsup). Had to use a multitool to widen the slots by a few mm. Put egress hinges in the bedroom windows as well.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/06/2016 09:35, John Rumm wrote:

Well, that's all done now. I made some brackets out of some old library book ends - this involved an angle grinder! Screwed the brackets to the frame, and screwed some board to the top of the brackets.
I also hacked out the bottom of the frame and spliced in a lot of new timber, with plentiful dollops of two part filler.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/5/2016 10:02 PM, GB wrote:

I'd fit the hinge to the window, so that when fitting the final screws you are screwing into something which can't move.
If it is on the ground floor, and not too heavy, I can imaging jury rigging something to support the window based perhaps on a step-ladder or one of those multi-purpose ladders / mini scaffolds. Perhaps using trigger clamps and bits of wood to make a suitable support for the window.
If upstairs, you need a mate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.