Glazing a traditional four panel door

I would like to glaze the top half of a couple of traditional doors like this one.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/jyeii74pm6x0sco/File%2001-05-2016%2C%2009%2027%2059.jpeg?dl=1
I'm guessing it's just a matter removing the beading and replacing the wood panel with suitable toughened glass. I say "just" but a 100 years of gloopy paint may need to be removed first.
Are there any particular gotchas or is this a bad idea?
Tim
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Tim+ wrote:

It's not 100% certain that the beads will be removable so you might have to cut them out. Then there is the issue of making matching beading. Doable if you have the equipment. Changes of an exact match down the DIY sheds? = minimal
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On 01/05/2016 09:32, Tim+ wrote:

The thickness of toughened glass may be somewhat greater than the panel it is intended to replace. Bevelling might help.
Bets of luck getting century-old beading out in usable pieces.
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Rod

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jim <k> wrote:

What, the mouldings? Not terribly. See photo link.
Tim
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I wanted exactly this for the door to the kitchen. To allow more light to that end of the hall.
To fit the correct thickness glass neatly and securely really needed bevelled adges.
I found a new door already glazed for not much more than the cost of having the toughened glass panels made.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Good point, if you live somewhere with such things available. I certainly wouldn't fit a modern lookalike door, but would fit a Victorian replacement. Used to live in Colchester where there was a place stuffed to the gunnels with Victorian doors, fire surrounds etc.
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It's a Victorian lookalike. In my case the original had already been badly hacked around to fit glass (which looked terrible) and although I could have rebuilt it the new one was better value. It's close enough in looks to pass the first glance test.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sun, 01 May 2016 12:59:55 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I did one here a long time ago and it looked like this (pre painting):
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5772409/Door.jpg
I can't remember how I did it but it might have involved a router?
Cheers, T i m
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writes

What others have said, and also, if removing the paint, the bottom coat will probably be that horrible green Victorian arsenic laced stuff, which you may prefer not to disturb. Probably best to have the whole door dip stripped first, rub down the raised grain with wire wool then decide whether to proceed with panel removal. At least you will have a better idea of construction with all the paint gone, and no worries about possible nasties in the paint.
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Graeme

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