Glasses for DIY


wrote:

Me too.

I never did anything like that. Just was slack enough about getting another eye check that I got quite a dramatic improvement when I did get new ones.
I have just done that again, being well aware that I couldn’t read the text on the smallest street name signs until I was closer than I used to be able to read them and have been having difficulty reading the numbers on houses from the car. When the license renewal showed up a couple of weeks ago, had to get off my arse to get new glasses from HongKong so I can pass the eye test when they do that for the license renewal. It will be a bit tight if they turn up in time.

Poor assumption.
I was initially told that I should wear mine while reading, but none of the later ophthalmologists thought that that original instruction made any sense. Bet yours was just another unscientific urban myth with no scientific basis for it.
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snipped-for-privacy@marfordfarm.demon.co.uk says...

You said earlier that your 'TV glasses' are really your distance vision pair.
What happens to the double vision you were complaining of originally if you wear them?

When I put 'reglazing glasses' into Google, it very obligingly prompted me with 'reglazing glasses specsavers'
The first hit says: "We offer single vision reglazing from £39 ..."
However, if you just search on 'reglazing glasses' you will find a plethora of companies offering postal reglazing services. Is Specsavers the only opticians near you? We must have about half a dozen in town ...
From what you said about your current frames obscuring your vision, though, they are obviously unfit for purpose - possibly they are much too narrow to suit your face? So why would you want to have them reglazed anyway?
I can't see the frames of my glasses - which came from Specsavers, as it happens and weren't particularly expensive - unless I try to look over the top for some strange reason and they most definitely don't obstruct my peripheral vision!
--

Terry

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Point light sources resolve back to single.

Yes. Now try getting by the sales drone in the shop front. The other issue is that they do not voluntarily give the inter-pupillary distance. I know this can be found with a rule and mirror but seems a bit selfish for what purports to be a free NH funded test.

No. Convenient for parking.

Metal framed so not massive. A quick test shows a vertical bar at about 60 deg. Peripheral goes round to 90+ and more for a light source. The answer is to learn to turn my head rather than just swivelling the eyes:-)

--
Tim Lamb

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On Tue, 29 Dec 2015 18:27:40 +0000, Tim Lamb wrote:

it

That's because you don't wear 'em enoough to get used to 'em. B-) I work outside in all weathers, do DIY with masks, wear eardefending headphones, not often a bone dome as I hate the things. Don't find glasses a problem at all. But I've been wearing them for about 50 years, have to walk into things if I don't...

There doesn't appear to be any focus feed back loop. If there was no one would need glasses for simple focus problems. The eyes adjust the lens to what should be correct but the shape of the eyeball means it isn't.
Presbyopia happens you can't do anything about it. Right PITA it is too, my natural in focus range is now only about 1" deep around 6" from my eyes.

I got away with that sort of age glasses from my 20's to mid forties or so. Since then presbyopia has slowly crept in and the single vision lenses have become varifocals and need changing about every year. I should imagine that my lenes will become rock hard fairly soon and the near prescription will stop changing. The normal, far, presciption hasn't changed over the creeping onset of prebyopia.

On my sample of Specsavers (Hexham) I won't go there again, managed to mess up the test some how, so one lens was incorrect, took far to much effort to geta re-test and new lens, even now I'm not overly happy about the glasses being correct. I used to go to a private opticians but they are ina town I don't frequent so it would be special trips (50 miles round). The rest of the family have been using Vision Express (Carlisle) with good results so I've just been to them. They'd rather sell you a new frame (that's where their profit is) but will re-glaze old frames provided they are in good condition and you have a suitable spare pair (if you *have* wear specs to function properly).
--
Cheers
Dave.
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I'm not sure what is meant by natural focus but this screen print is in focus at about 1m -->
--
Tim Lamb

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On Fri, 1 Jan 2016 12:26:30 +0000, Tim Lamb wrote:

is

The distance and range my eyes can focus at without artifical aid. Essentially I'm now fixed focus at about 6" at lower light levels, high levels of light do make the range a bit wider as the iris stops down.
Presbyopia is hardening of the lens with age, this stops the lens muscles from adjusting the lens shape and thus focus point.
--
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Dave.
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Think that is myopia - sort sight? Presbyobia is long sight where the rest focus position of the eye is beyond infinity.
At least if you are short sighted you can remove your specs to read. ;-)
I've got presbyobia and astigmatism so have needed correction for everything.
--
*When cheese gets its picture taken, what does it say? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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and the name "Presbyopia" is derived from the Greek for "old". It happens to most of us with time.
--
Please note new email address:
snipped-for-privacy@CandEhope.me.uk
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Yes - I'm confusing hyperopia with presbyopia, although the results are much the same as you get older.
--
*What am I? Flypaper for freaks!?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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My experience is that they are willing to do it, but charge a few which is greater than the cost of any but the most expensive new frames. So almost nobody gets it done.
--
Clive Page

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I wanted my Varifocal sunglasses reglazed and IIRC my optician wanted ~£200, Specsavers wanted ~£120, but sold me a new pair of sunglasses with the same prescription for £65.
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Today is Sweetmorn, the 1st day of Chaos in the YOLD 3182
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On 29/12/2015 11:59, Tim Lamb wrote:

I find point light sources in low light stretch out into "lines" aligned with the angle of my astigmatism for each eye (which in my case yields a crossover effect). What is odd (but not uncommon I suspect) is that the "line" is not a smooth bright central point with "ends" of diminishing brightness which fade to dark, but is has instead some granularity to it, so you see the line punctuated by more clearly defined (but dimmer) copies of the main image of the light source diminishing toward the ends.
--
Cheers,

John.
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snipped-for-privacy@marfordfarm.demon.co.uk says...

Does it not occur to you that you have chosen the wrong frames?
--

Terry

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I suppose rimless might be better but these are not John Lennon mini portholes or the current vogue for black plastic fencing.
Maybe my eyes are set back abnormally or have better peripheral performance than necessary. I have only tried them for driving and found slip roads/T junctions a bit unnerving.

--
Tim Lamb

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On Thu, 31 Dec 2015 15:59:12 +0000, Tim Lamb wrote:

"Fashion" has far too much influence on the availabillty of frames that actually let you see properly. A year or so back "fashion" meant that the only frames about were slits so like looking through a letter box. Larger rounder frames are about these days but even the largest ares still to small IMHO. Bring back what you could get in the 70's, depending on your prescription getting the the lens from the blank could be quite a squeeze. Blanks are what 2 1/2" dia?
Things that affect your vision need getting used to, so need to be worn most of the time. It's not only the shape of the world that changes (not much at the lower powers) but also how one move ones whole head to get the best vision. This includes "moving" the frame out of the way.
--
Cheers
Dave.
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On 28/12/2015 08:55, Brian Reay wrote:

That would be about correct and is why its really bad when some idiot puts the lenses in 90 degrees out.
I don't think TNP has a clue from his claim that what I said was wrong.
I have astigmatism of about 4 dioptres so i know exactly what its like.
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On 28/12/2015 10:22, dennis@home wrote:

I think it was Andy's use of the word "prismatic" which confused things. While one can have prismatic lenses, they are not typically used for correcting astigmatism. (normally specified as a combination of a main lens speherical power, and then a separate cylindrical power along with its associated angle).
Prismatic shifts can be used shift the whole image up / down / left / right which is separate from any astigmatism correction. I learnt a long time ago never to try on my Mother's specs which include prismatic corrections, unless you want headache in a hurry! (she has needed them to correct double vision suffered following a fractured her skull in her late teens)
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John.
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A lot of people never seem to have heard of astigmatism, let alone know what it is.
I used to describe it as flat eyeballs and, when my astigmatism was very bad about 20 years ago, used to hand them of my glasses and tell them to look through the right lens at the clock, if there was one, whilst rotating the glasses through 90 degrees.
Their reactions were usually quite interesting ...
--

Terry

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Most would know that a lens is normally like a slice of a sphere. In the case of astigmatism, think more of an egg, or rugby ball. So it has a different power according to axis. Specs to correct this do more or less the opposite.
However, a rigid contact lens corrects the astigmatism easily, as it becomes effectively part of the cornea. If all the astigmatism is on the front of the cornea. A soft lens forms to the cornea, so needs optics to correct the astigmatism.
--
*What do little birdies see when they get knocked unconscious? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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The way it was explained to me by an optician was that, where the hard lens diverges from the curvature of the cornea, fluid builds up in the gaps and it is these wedges of fluid, which act as prisms, which correct the errors caused by the distorted cornea.
--

Terry

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