Generator

I now have a portable generator for the garage. Very old, but can't complain at a 1.5kW for 80 quid.
It has no instructions, and although I've put some unleaded in and started it to confirm it runs and produces electricity, I don't know what to do about oil. It's a 2 stroke, I gather, but has a seperate "oil fill" cap. Do I still have to put oil in the petrol as I gather is normal with 2 stroke engines? What kind of oil is needed? Is there a proper 2 stroke engine oil? And does the same stuff go in the "oil fill" cap?
It's incredibly loud so I'm thinking of building an enclosure around it- essentially a frame to hold some insulation. Does anyone have recommendations on insulation I can get easily and cheaply (i.e. Wickes or Screwfix) that will bring the sound down to more manageable levels? Will expanded polystyrene roof insulation do a decent job?
There's no exhaust pipe or air pipe- just holes somewhere. So I'm thinking of a pair of holes with small-ish fans in, pushing air in at the bottom of one side and taking it out at the top of the other. Does this sound adequate? Guess I can always double up to increase the airflow through the same holes if I need to.
-- Dr. Craig Graham, Software Engineer Advanced Analysis and Integration Limited, UK. http://www.aail.co.uk /
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complain
Do
oil?
Whether it uses pre-mix or it has a seperate tank for two stroke oil then it needs real two stroke oil, any garage or motorbike shop, halfords etc. will sell it.
Quietening it, without overheating will not be easy.
mrcheerful mrcheerful
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No it's a Briggs and Stratton 4 stroke side valve engine. The oil go's in the bottom and should be level with the filler plug. If you in-case this thing to reduce noise it WILL eventually seize. Side Valve engines seem to run extra hot using unleaded as it is.
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It's probably loud because it's air cooled without the sound insulating benefit of a water jacket. Draw your own conclusions about trying to stop air getting in/out as you have to to soundproof.
--
*I speak fluent patriarchy but it's not my mother tongue

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

Well, I've already said I intend to put an air inlet and outlet on the enclosure, both forced by fans.
If the sound comes out in all directions and I can reduce all but the sound coming down the air pipes then that's pretty significant. And if there's a baffle comprising an extra sheet of insulating material a couple of inches ahead of the holes inside the enclosure then that should reduce it further. But this is all conjecture since I've never done it before, which is why I'm looking for information.
If need be I can wear ear muffs. I'm concerned about the sound level in some flats across the street from the garage, but it may be that it's not a major problem. Right next to the unit, with the sound reflecting off the brick walls, is of course going to be far louder than across the street. This means that I don't have to silence it- I just have to make sure it's tolerable away from the garage.
--
Dr. Craig Graham, Software Engineer
Advanced Analysis and Integration Limited, UK. http://www.aail.co.uk /
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On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 10:36:13 +0100, "Craig Graham"

Material to reduce this type of sound has to heavy - e.g. a heavy grade Rockwool. Perhaps some judiciously placed on parts of the garage walls would help as well.....
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

"High Density Rockwool Slabs" from Wicks sound the thing to try then. Thanks for the responses.
--
Dr. Craig Graham, Software Engineer
Advanced Analysis and Integration Limited, UK. http://www.aail.co.uk /
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They are useless for suppressing noise. A better solution is to use the sheets designed for the job, these are a composite of sound absorbing foam, a material to dissipate sound energy (lead or a polymer) and more foam or bitumen. This is sold in sheets for DIY use and it's much thinner than the rockwool. I've tried high density rockwool before now. It no effect at all on sound.
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On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 12:33:02 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@malloc.co.uk (Steve Firth) wrote:

Hi,
In what way were you using it?
cheers, Pete.
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[snip]

To suppress noise through a bricked-up door frame. I coated the bricks with a sound absorbent bitumen paper. Then there was a layer of high density rockwool, then a sheet of chipboard with the inner surface coated with self adhesive bitumen sound absorbent pads. The chipboard was fastened to the bricks using "floating" standoffs designed to stop the transmission of noise to the sheet. Finally there was the old door.
Didn't make a tad of difference to the noise. OTOH Halyard acoustic barrier foam with a lead interlayer solved the problem.
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On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 00:06:00 +0100, %steve%@malloc.co.uk (Steve Firth) wrote:

Thanks I'll bear that in mind. I thought it might help in a generator box to stop the sound bouncing around and getting out, much like the wadding in a loudspeaker.
cheers, Pete.
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Driven by electricity from the generator? With only 1.5 kW available, you're not going to be left with much.
--
*A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Wouldn't it have been cheaper and easier to have bought a quiet (four stroke) generator to start with?
--
Chris Green

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

I considered them, but they seem to be rated only around 650W continuous. My power tools are generally in the 800-1400W range. I think the only thing I have that comes in under 650W is the jigsaw. There is quite a big jump in price to get to the 1.5kW ones. I didn't want to get an underrated one and have it keep tripping when tools start, or while a drill is in the material and a pain to remove if stalled.
--
Dr. Craig Graham, Software Engineer
Advanced Analysis and Integration Limited, UK. http://www.aail.co.uk /
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On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 14:43:18 +0100, "Craig Graham"

Hi,
Is your garage at the end of your garden? If so would it be possible to run an extension lead out to it?
cheers, Pete.
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Pete C wrote:

I wish. I'm in a terraced house, and the garage is a brief walk up the road. No way of getting power to it unless I get the electric board to dig in a cable and install a proper supply. Which is not cheap, and given it's a rented garage it's not really worth it.
So far I've been using power tools in the garden and storing them in a cupboard in the dining room, but it's hardly convenient- especially when things need time to dry.
--
Dr. Craig Graham, Software Engineer
Advanced Analysis and Integration Limited, UK. http://www.aail.co.uk /
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On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 17:09:37 +0100, "Craig Graham"

I see. If some couplings could be made up for connecting a car exhaust that would make a big big difference, a box might not even be needed then.
A good start for a box might be to make it out of Fermacell or equivalent or even concrete slabs, with double baffles on the air intake and exhaust. A close fitting stepped lid with a foam or rubber gasket would help stop sound leaking out and flexible mounts on the generator would reduce vibration reaching the box.
If that's not enough, try lining the box and/or baffles with Rockwool slabs to absorb as much sound as possible and prevent it from escaping.
If it is put in a box it's well worth having some sort of thermal trip and a kill switch on the outside, a thermostat and switch in the coil circuit would do it. If the generator is loaded at 1.5kW it will produce about 6kW of heat which could make it overheat in a box. Having an external fuel outside the box would also be well worth having, allowing the fuel supply to be isolated and making refuelling easier.
If you're only using basic woodworking tools one alternative might be to get a cordless drill/jigsaw/circular saw set. You could charge or even run them from a deep cycle battery/inverter. A 12v 100Ah battery would give about 500Wh of usable mains power before needing recharging.
cheers, Pete.
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On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 10:13:18 +0100, Dave Plowman wrote:

Personally I think "There's no exhaust pipe or air pipe- just holes somewhere." has more to do with it, with no silencer any engine is going to fing *LOUD* even more so under load.
Of course I could be reading things incorrectly but if it doesn't have any exhaust system or silencer fabricating something to fulfill that role will be usefull...
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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Holes everywhere implies more than one. If there was no exhaust system/intake system, then there would only be a couple of holes.
It's probably just that there is no obvious pipes.
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Ian Stirling wrote:

Thanks for the paving slab suggestion.
The unit is still listed on ebay so there are useful photos; http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item#89346038&categoryF412&sspagename=STRK%3AMEBWN%3AIT&rd=1#ebayphotohosting
Or http://tinyurl.com/23z7r
In the first picture, the generator is to the left, the engine to the right and the fuel tank overhangs bottom right. There is a box on top of the fuel tank that I assume is the air filter, since there's an oil filling cap at the bottom of the engine (out of sight). The odd rusty-coloured box lower middle may be an exhaust- it's the only likely candidate though I haven't run the unit for very long yet- just enough to verify it starts and runs a random power tool. When I have proper oil and (to be on the safe side) some oil mixed with the petrol I'll be happier about running it for long enough to have a good play with it!
The panel on the left of the funny rust coloured box can be pressed in as if it is a button but it doesn't seem to do anything. There are holes behind it, in the rust coloured box, which is why I thought it would be the exhaust.
--
Dr. Craig Graham, Software Engineer
Advanced Analysis and Integration Limited, UK. http://www.aail.co.uk /
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