Fused neutral cutout.

Just has a letter from UK Power Networks stating their records show I have one of these which is outdated and needs to be replaced urgently.
Be interested to know why this has suddenly become urgent. ;-)
However, mine was replaced by a single line fuse with neutral link some 40 odd years ago - before I bought this house.
But the point of this post is the diagram on the letter - to allow you to identify your unit - shows an earth terminal as being part of their obligatory supply. Last time I checked, this wasn't the case. Have the regs changed? Can I demand they fit one FOC?
--
*I'm not a paranoid, deranged millionaire. Dammit, I'm a billionaire.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 17/07/2018 14:31, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I don't think they're obliged to provide one but in London "they" will provide PME free if it's available in your area so long as your installation is up to date (which Adam thought meant the main bonding).
See
https://www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk/internet/en/our-services/earthing/
--
Robin
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On 17/07/2018 14:57, Robin wrote:

Fuck knows what the meter installers think up to not do a job. I was refused a meter installation on a job last week because there was no earth rod.
True there was was no earth rod, but there was also no CU or indeed any wiring (other than their incoming supply).
"Why do I need an earth rod now?" "So I can install the meter" "The meter does not need an earth" "But you might not fit one" "Is that the wrong meter you have brought?" "No" "Why have you brought a three phase meter?"
Packed his bags and went.
- Adam
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On Tue, 17 Jul 2018 18:27:30 +0100, ARW

I'd love to have three phase in case I buy an electric car in the future.
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On 17/07/2018 18:33, Scott wrote:

Well you will have to do with a 32A Mode 3 charging point then:-)
Let me know if you want one in the near future, I can apply for the grant available (75% of the installation cost up to a maximum of £500) whilst the government are offering grants.
Or if you want to DIY it then I will have to get around to writing a WIKI page on the subject. It's not as easy as just sticking a 16A or 32A socket on the outside wall.
--
Adam

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On 17/07/2018 19:09, ARW wrote:

Is there anything special I should know to go in the new box in my (half complete) garage?
The house supply is 100A, and the spur out there currently has a 63A RCD.
I have no immediate plans for an electric car, but it would be silly not to allow for it.
Andy
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On 22/07/2018 23:09, Vir Campestris wrote:

Is that with a 50kw DC charger or the mundane 32A AC one?
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On 22/07/2018 23:19, dennis@home wrote:

That's what I want to know.
32A wouldn't be a problem. 50kW would be. I don't have that much to the house (100A = ~24kW).
Andy
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On 22/07/2018 23:09, Vir Campestris wrote:

63A RCD is not very helpful;-).
However the main thing to consider at this point is at least getting a cable in that is big enough to power your future needs (no such thing a a cable that is too big).
Mode 3 charging, which is almost certainly going to be the big seller due to the grants, can supply up to 63A. I suspect that the 32A will be the big seller due to the available supply.
I'll have to do a Wiki as there is the type of RCD and possibly making the supply a TT supply.
I'll help you size a suitable cable if it is still possible to get one in.
--
Adam

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On 23/07/2018 17:48, ARW wrote:

Given I have 100A to the house taking more than 63A out would be greedy :) - we both want an induction hob in the new kitchen for a start. But the cable is fixed - sparky was happy that it was sized correctly for the 63A RCD, and it was already running out to the old garage. Replacing it would have meant removing the weatherboarding on the house.
I'll have to ask him if the cable is big enough for any more than that.
Must also ask about RCBOs...
Thanks Andy
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It's sometimes interesting to check permissible efli for 63A type C 60898 mcbs and compare that figure with available conditions. Most of the 2391 students I did practical assessment of struggled with what they met on the official test rig.
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On 17/07/2018 19:09, ARW wrote:

Bit tricky if the property only has a single phase and neutral (plus PME) underground supply though ??.
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On 26/07/2018 18:14, Andrew wrote:

That bit ought not be a problem, so long as there is enough capacity.
However there are some specific requirements that apply to vehicle charging points over and above those normally associated with outside sockets. There is a dedicated section in the regs (722) that covers these installations. There are also a series of BS Docs (starting BS EN 61851) that cover EV charging.
You will also need a different type of RCD (a type "A" or "B" rather than the more typical type "AC") to protect the circuit feeding the charge point.
--
Cheers,

John.
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John Rumm wrote:

The neighbour's unit seems to consist of a DIN rail mounted RCBO, contactor and control unit.
How come they aren't required to be metal-clad as they're effectively a 1-way CU?
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On 27/07/2018 14:02, Andy Burns wrote:

Is it on the outside of the house? (Asked as IIRC the new "non-combustible" reg. only applies to CUs "within" domestic premises; but wait for John, Adam et al for a reliable answer.)
--
Robin
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Robin wrote:

Yes.
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wrote:

Would metal not be prone to corrosion and therefore plastic better?
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On Tuesday, 17 July 2018 18:33:12 UTC+1, Scott wrote:

Most electric cars/PHEVs can be charged from a 13a socket. (Overnight). Intermediate chargers are around 30a single phase.
Rapid charging shortens battery life. Three phase costs more.
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On 23/07/2018 08:14, harry wrote:

Any practical[1] mainstream EV could only be charged to a tiny fraction of its capacity from 13A overnight.
[1] i.e. not the virtue signalling toy ones like yours.
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John.
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On Tuesday, 24 July 2018 02:39:05 UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

Drivel. As usual you are "expert" on something you have zero knowledge and experience of.
No-one runs their electric car to depletion. Or anywhere near. Only supercars have very large batteries. Most have batteries of 40 Kwh or less. Many have less than 20 Kwh. Easily capable of recharging overnight on 13a socket.
The reason for these special sockets is so that in the future they can be separately metered and charged for at a much higher rate to make up for fuel tax losses.
None of this will ever happen. If everyone had an electric car and was charging it overnight, the system could not cope, especially charging at a fast rate. The proles will be back on public transport, few people will be able to afford an (electric) car.
Depreciation is huge. No-one wants a SH electric car due to potential battery replacement costs.
Plus there probably isn't enough lithium/neodymium to go round.
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