Floor tiles

I want to remove some floor tiles in my bathroom that are laid right up to a wall which is also tiled - there's no skirting board.
Here's a picture:
http://i60.tinypic.com/m565h.jpg
However I'm worried about damaging the wall tiles due to the horizontal force travelling through the floor tiles. Unfortunately the previous owner left no spare wall tiles.
What's the best way to remove them without damaging the wall tiles?
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On 02/01/2015 06:52, Charlie wrote:

All depends on how well the floor tiles are stuck down.
Last time I lifted some I used an angle grinder with stone cutting disk (like Toolstation 97863) to cut out the grout on a central tile, then lifted one at a time with a bolster working towards the walls.
It was surprisingly easy.
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On 02/01/15 06:52, Charlie wrote:

I doubt that the act of shearing the edge floor tile from the adhesive will hurt the wall.
However, if you can cut the grout line between wall and floor at the base of the wall with an angle grinder, Fein tool or somehow, that should provide a bit of decoupling when the floor tile lifts. You can then replace with a line of flexible sealant (what I usually do between floor and wall).
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On Friday, January 2, 2015 8:30:44 AM UTC, Tim Watts wrote:

+1
NT
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On Friday, January 2, 2015 8:30:44 AM UTC, Tim Watts wrote:

to a wall which is also tiled - there's no skirting board.

force travelling through the floor tiles. Unfortunately the previous owner left no spare wall tiles.

I once tried to remove and replace a cracked tile. Whilst using a bolster I managed damage an adjacent tile despite it being about 6" from where I was using the bolster. I guess I managed to "push" the piece of tile I was rem oving hard enough into the adjacent tile. If their is a small recess behind the wall tile (where it meets the floor) I'm worried the same sort of thin g might happen.


OK, makes sense. What about a dremmel or will that basically offer me the s ame. I'm completely removing all the floor tiles so I'll bear in mind using sealant when I re-tile the floor.
Sorry for being a bit overcautious, it's just that I don't know where the p revious owner bought the tiles and I have NO SPARES.
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On Friday, January 2, 2015 8:52:36 PM UTC, Charlie wrote:

up to a wall which is also tiled - there's no skirting board.

al force travelling through the floor tiles. Unfortunately the previous own er left no spare wall tiles.


I managed damage an adjacent tile despite it being about 6" from where I w as using the bolster. I guess I managed to "push" the piece of tile I was r emoving hard enough into the adjacent tile. If their is a small recess behi nd the wall tile (where it meets the floor) I'm worried the same sort of th ing might happen.



same. I'm completely removing all the floor tiles so I'll bear in mind usi ng sealant when I re-tile the floor.

previous owner bought the tiles and I have NO SPARES.
dremel would take forever, just use a hand grout saw/remover.
NT
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Do you care about all the floor tiles ?
You can obviously break the ones closest to the wall and can do that without damaging the wall tiles.
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On Friday, January 2, 2015 8:33:07 AM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

No, I plan on removing all the floor tiles. It's the removal of the ones ad jacent to the wall that I'm most concerned about, especially if some of the plaster is missing at the base of the wall and there is a gap behind the b ottom of the tile as it may crack easily if any force is applied to it.
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Yes, but are you going to throw them away or reuse them ?

Yes, but if you aren't going to reuse them, you should be able to break the ones adjacent to the wall without damaging the wall tiles.

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On Saturday, January 3, 2015 6:12:47 PM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

Yes I'm going to throw them all away as I'm re-tiling the floor. I saw this this guy doing something similar too easy, has he got a hammer action on that?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rs_MweC_PAo

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OK, then I would break up the row of tiles that are one row in from the wall and then the one that is up against the wall.
It should be very easy to do that without any risk of damage to the wall at all.
Even less risk than using a multitool on the grout between the floor and the wall and less risk than using something to get rid of the grout one floor tile in from that and leavering the floor tiles once you have done that.


Yes he has. I wouldn't do it that way myself, too easy to slip and go into the wall IMO. I'd use a lump hammer and chisel to break up the two rows of tiles as I stated above. www.google.com/search?q=lump+hammer&tbm=isch
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On Sunday, January 4, 2015 6:19:28 PM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

Rod has confidence in everything beyond reason
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wrote

You never could bullshit your way out of a wet paper bag.
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On Sunday, January 4, 2015 9:30:32 PM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

and thats his reply to almost everything
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wrote in message

You never could bullshit and lie your way out of a wet paper bag.
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On Sunday, January 4, 2015 6:19:28 PM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

Brilliant, cheers Rod
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On 02/01/2015 06:52, Charlie wrote:

Since it looks like the wall tiles went on first (ie they don't overlie the floor tiles) I wouldn't think you'd have too much trouble here.
I would lift the tiles starting in the middle of the floor and work out to these more important edges. This will give you a feel for how well stuck everything is. Once you cut through the grout though, lifting the tiles shouldn't be too hard.
I recently had to cut out a patch of tiles that had lost adhesion. I tried a few ways to break through the grout but the best by a long stretch was a carbide grit cutter on my mutlitool. I was a bit surprised as it was from one of the Aldi sets and I didn't expect it to last five minutes.
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Probably, looks like an SDS drill.
I think that if you take up the tiles in the middle of the floor first. Club hammer and bolster, though if you have an SDS drill then a chisel in that might be easier esp if they are stuck well.
Then should be easier enough to lift the ones at the edge with out damaging the wall tiles. Once you have one out you can go along, rather than towards the wall anyway. If I was worried I'd use a Tungsten Carbide grit blade in a multitool to cut the tile/grout.
--
Chris French


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Bosch PMF or similar multitool.
Best new invention for DIY. http://www.bosch-pmf.com/gb/en/
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