Flat or slightly sloping roof question

Looking at replacing a small flat roof on an extension (thread a couple of months ago).
Expected cost around £1k.
I was looking at the powder coated steel roof of our shed the other day and thinking that it was looking pretty good 3 years or more on.
I know that this is not a traditional finish for a flat roof on a domestic property, but is there any other reason not to?
Cheers
Dave R
--
Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/07/16 14:42, David wrote:

If it were me, I'd consider zinc or aluminium.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is that not going to generate a lot of noise when it rains? Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 08 Jul 2016 16:23:15 +0100, Brian Gaff wrote:

We have a powder coated steel roof on our house extension (specialist roofing from Tata Steel) but this is designed to look like a zinc roof. It is a number of sheets with crimped joints. Looks pretty good.
It isn't particularly noisy in heavy rain because it is laid on wooden sheets (can't now remember if they were OSB or chip board) designed for roofing.
Under that is a significant amount of Celotex (or similar) to modern building regs.
However here I am looking at the corrugated (square section) roofing more commonly used in agricultural buildings.
It won't look pretty, but it should be durable. Possibly as durable as torch on felt.
It has just occurred to me that if it does get worn out (or at least rusty) then all you have to do is unscrew the bolts and bolt new metal sheeting in place.
Just idly toying with the idea at the moment, but it could be an interesting option.
Cheers
Dave R
--
Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes - that's unlikely to be much different to a felt roof as the mass of the board stops it resonating as well as attenuating the noise. As will the plasterboard ceiling.
Steel sheets with no boarding are likely a different matter.
--
*Work is for people who don't know how to fish.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David wrote:

Noise? ether when it rains, or possible annoying clicky noises when it expands/contracts ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 8 July 2016 14:42:46 UTC+1, David wrote:

f

c

It works well. But eventually it'll be a rusting eyesore.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 8 July 2016 16:33:48 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

of

tic

There is a similar alternative made out of zinc. Expensive.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David wrote:

Many years ago when I lived in Australia :-( some houses had "tin" roofs. Apparently when it rained the noise was awful.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/07/16 16:37, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

I lived in a tin roofed converted garden shed in S Africa. When it hailed, which it did, often, it was deafening.
Mind you it wasn't insulated either.
--
The biggest threat to humanity comes from socialism, which has utterly
diverted our attention away from what really matters to our existential
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 8 July 2016 17:39:39 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

ofs.

I assume that insulation, joists & ceiling would much reduce the noise.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd personally have galvanised instead of powder coated.

Even sillier than you usually manage.

I just don’t believe that it hails anywhere often.

They don’t actually with hail. But it isnt hard to have rockwool or similar insulation immediately under the metal decking with chicken wire under that which holds the rockwool up against the underside of the decking which makes a hell of a difference with heavy rain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 8 July 2016 16:37:18 UTC+1, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

Made up for, no doubt, by the fact it was raining.
The tin has several inches of insulation under it. The major problem is pre serving the weather seal at joints. Tin flexes in violent winds and expands and contracts a lot more than stone or clay. Large sheets being both a ble ssing and a downfall. I imagine going around the finished product with a so ldering iron might be the only way to cure that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not necessarily, we have a wet winter at the moment.

Not with metal decking which has no joints at all where the water is, it is one continuous length with the joints well up from the deck itself where there is no water.

Yes.

Not when they are long and thin with the joint well up from the deck. Which is why metal decking is done that way.

You're wrong. The way to fix the problem is the way metal decking does it, very long sheets that have no joints at all where the water is with the joints between the individual sheets of decking well up out of the water. Works very well indeed and very easy to lift up a sheet to get at the wiring etc and put it back again too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wouldn't the solder tend to come away from the steel when flexing occurred on hot sunny days?
--
Women claim that they never pursue a man. Well, by the same token, a mousetrap never pursues a mouse, but the end result is
the same.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not when the roof is designed properly so the metal can move.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the metal moves, the solder is put under strain.
--
Pat Glenn, weightlifting commentator - "And this is Gregoriava from Bulgaria. I saw her snatch this morning and it was amazing!"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not if the design allows the metal to move without any strain.
That's how metal decking works, there are clips under the decking and no screws thru the decking at all so there is no strain on the metal at all as it heats up and cools down with the weather. Don't get any clicking from the decking either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Jul 2016 21:48:01 +0100, "James Wilkinson"

I recently had a shed roof [Corrougated Steel] replaced, one of the items charged for that was not included with the original was a tub of grease. This it turns out was to lubricate the overlapping flashing that covers the wall/ roof at the edges that don't drain.
Not sure how long it lasts though and I dont see any grease noipples anywhere for the service :-(
AB
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you want your nipples greased, you need someone other than a tradesman ;-)
--
*Squawk!* Pieces of Nine! Pieces of Nine! [Parroty error]

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.