Fixing skirting - glue or screw?

I've just laid a new engineered wood floor, and now wish to fit the
skirting boards. They've been cut to size and mitred ready for
fitting, but the carpenter's gone awol. My brother (a cabinet maker)
suggested fixing them with Gripfil, or NoMoreNails, or similar. Would
that be sufficient? Or do they need pinning or screwing as well?
Walls are in good nick (new plaster).
Thanks
Edward
Reply to
teddysnips
================================== A few of these (quick and easy to use) will add 'belt and braces' security:
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Reply to
Cicero
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?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=hammer+fixingsFor skirting boards?? You jest I presume.
No nails is OK.
HTH
John
Reply to
John
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================================== Absolutely not. Skirtings were traditionally fixed with a couple of 4" nails hammered into wooden wedges driven into the brickwork at 3' spacing so these hammer fixings do much the same job but more easily.
Of course if the walls are modern stud walls then a few screws or a bit of adhesive will do just as well but there is a vague suggestion in the OP's post ("Walls are in good nick (new plaster)") that the walls are masonry.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
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?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=hammer+fixings>>>> For skirting boards?? You jest I presume.
In my opinion hammer fixings are way OTT for skirting boards on any surface. The damn things aren't going to go anywhere so why the need for a heavy duty fixing? If the OP doesnt want to use No Nails etc then a few plugs and screws will suffice, or he can daig out some mortar and insert wooden wedges and do it the "traditional" way. If we are talking "traditionally ....." then we would all still be going to the carsie (sp?) down the street we shared with our neighbours and getting bathed in front of the fire!
HTH
John
Reply to
John
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(Snip...) If we are talking
Khazi...since yer askin'
Reply to
Lino expert
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?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=hammer+fixings>>>>>> For skirting boards?? You jest I presume.
================================== Quote from Screwfix / DIYnot about their hammer fixings:
"Nylon Plug with hardened drive Screw. Fast, cheap way to fix battens, conduit etc to masonry."
You're welcome to your opinion which appears to be less than well-informed. A single 6mm hole is drilled directly through wood (skirting etc.) and brick at the same time. A small hammer fixing is inserted and hammered in - i.e. tapped gently. The process is repeated and is aided by the fact that the skirting is firmly held and positioned by the first fixing. That's easy.
I assume you don't know the difference between 'frame fixings' which are heavy duty and 'hammer fixings' as described in the Screwfix catalogue and also sold by Wickes for this kind of light duty fixing.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
Belt and braces - my middle names! This together with GripFil will do the job such that I don't have to worry. Part of my reservation is that some of the walls are quite long, and despite the plaster being in good nick, I can't guaranted that it's totally flat (nor the skirting, for that matter).
Thanks
Edward
Reply to
teddysnips
================================== Screwfix recently opened a branch here (Wolverhampton). It will be interesting to see if their prices have any effect on Wickes. Wickes may have to modify their fancy packaging (hard plastic) and prices or lose out to Screwfix. All good for the customer!
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
The size is about the same but Screwfix hammer fixings (6mm x 60mm) are £3.52 per 100 (8mm x 80mm - £5.84 / 100) which makes them considerably cheaper than those you cite at £17-00p per 100.
Hammer fixings also have the advantage that they can be unscrewed if necessary.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
My problem with skirting is when I have only the top edge against plaster. So I'm fixing small blocks to the back of the skirting to keep them vertical. Frigging bane of my life.
Arthur
Reply to
Arthur2
On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 20:54:54 GMT, Cicero wrote:
Not necessarily. Once Wickes have gone, Screwfix can bump up their prices.
Reply to
Frank Erskine
I often find Screwfix expensive compared to Toolstation, which I believe was setup by the original people that set up Screwfix, but Screwfix has been sold to B&Q.
Reply to
Cod Roe
As I heard the story; The original Screwfic guy sold out to the Kingfisher Group who also own B&Q. In the buy out contract was a 5 year clause. After 5 years he started Toolstation.
More to Toolstation than meets the eye. A lot of their stuff is Silverline brand, so I suspect they are one & the same company and some of their stuff is the same brand name as the stuff Aldi sell.
Screwfix & Toolstation are both opening trade counters which is bound to drive down prices. B&Q, Homebase etc are moving more into 'lifestyle' stuff.
Reply to
The Medway Handyman
================================== Is there any likelihood that Wickes will go in the near future? My local one is well-used and pretty well-stocked. Personally, I prefer to be able to inspect and handle unfamiliar items rather than select from a catalogue if possible. That's what attracts so many people to B&Q as well.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero

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