Filling screw and nail holes in skirting before painting

We've had a lot of new doors, architrave and skirting fitted in our extension. I was disappointed to see how many holes were left by the screws and nails holding it in place. In some places, I've already had a stab at this and just used an ordinary brown wood filler in a little tin I had lying around. However, I found it impossible to work with as it went off so quickly. I wasn't able to smooth it, and it dries so hard I couldn't sand it smooth!
I was rather bewildered by the choice at "Buy & Queue" (and alarmed at the cost) this morning so left empty handed (again!). Can anyone recommend a specific product/brand that would do the job for me? Also, would I need to treat the screw and nail heads first to prevent rust in the lnger term?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Prime with universal primer (taking care to cover metal). Fill with fine Polyfilla (or similar), sand, undercoat, gloss.
Why, may I ask, were you filling with wood filler in an attempt to match the colour if you are painting? If you want to varnish, of course, it's a different kettle of fish....
--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Mannix wrote:

NOTE: always use cement-based filler that you mix with water. Other types shrink when drying leaving a concave dent above the screw holes. I know, I did it, and had to fill all the holes several times or overfill and sand to get them flat. Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sm_jamieson wrote:

That's my experience too. Sorry to sound dumb but what is "cement based" filler ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Most of the powder fillers will be cement-based. It will say on the packet something like "contains portland cement". I think I used this: http://www.polycell.co.uk/products/polycell_multi-purpose_polyfilla_powder.html
If you are keeping a wood finish of course, its a different matter. The only proper way then is to screw and plug the holes, as a pro would do.
Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sm_jamieson wrote:

http://www.polycell.co.uk/products/polycell_multi-purpose_polyfilla_powder . html
Modellers putty is cement based and is managable to get a smooth surface with a little light rubbing when hard.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Interior filler is the right stuff, you just need to mix it thicker
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Mannix wrote:

I just used it because, I assumed, I should fill holes in wood with wood filler!
Past experience with Pollyfilla in wood hasn't been very succesfull for me - it almost inevitably cracks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It should be fine in nail/screw head size holes and painted over - I have never done it any other way and never had a problem (unless caused by another problem - loose fixing, too much movement etc). Fixing up to varnish is a right PITA though.
--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Try wetting the filler or sandpaper and then sanding.
If not modellers putty as the filler.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.