Fitting oil central heating

OK, I probably already know the answer to this but I need someone to mansplain it in simple terms so I am sure what I am talking about:
When you fit oil central heating, what is involved?
I currently have no oil, no tank, no pipes - in fact nothing......
simple things like how do they get the oil form the tank to the boiler and from the boiler to the radiators etc please.
I know I sound daft but my OH is fixated with getting oil ( we are not on the gas grid).
I currently have electric (E7) - and frankly, whatever others think, I like it. Its simple, doesnt disrupt the house, never goes wrong and its simple for me to switch on and off and its clean.
Also, how much will it cost to buy the stuff and fit the oil heating etc? OH thinks he can do it himself but I fear this is a job with a lot of disruption.... and cost to fabric of the house and decoration etc ???
OH wont fix any of those things afterwards.
So, just a simple explanation of what is involved ( not a moral tale of costs please).
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On Monday, 31 July 2017 09:07:06 UTC+1, sweetheart wrote:

You will need space for a bunded oil tank. A small pipe brings the oil to the boiler, which you will need to find space for in your house. The biggest disruption will be fitting pipes round the house from the boiler going to each radiator.
Jonathan
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Let me get this straight, the garden/ drive or paths will have to be dug up for the pipes?
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Depends where you put the tank. You could have it close to the house, but keep in mind you will have oil arriving by tanker, so the tanker needs to get close enough to your tank to enable the driver to pull his hose from his tanker to your tank.
But yes, you will almost certainly require the pipe from your tank to your boiler to be underground.
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On 31/07/2017 09:42, Graeme wrote:

They have very long hoses. A friend of mine has terrace house in a rural village. The delivery tanker parks at the front door the hose goes through the house - front door to back door - and then 20 metres to the bottom of the garden.

But only requires a narrow trench to be dug.
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On 31/07/17 09:42, Graeme wrote:

so no more than 100 meters from where the tanker can park

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On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 10:21:10 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

house,
All manner of regulations now govern where an oil tank can be. We'll have a problem if they ever come to apply to our tank, as with most regulation changes they aren't retrospective. No part of a tank can be closer than 1 m(?) to a window, inc ase of fire inside breaking out through the window...

tanker

pull his

Tanker size varies, most oil firms have a mini tanker that can get down rough farm tracks. 100 m sounds a bit long for the delivery hose to me, there isn't much left on the reel when we get a delivery and I would say they have 50 m or less out. I doubt a mini tanker has that much but then as it can basically get where ever a Land Rover can it doesn't need a long delivery hose.
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On 31/07/17 09:29, sweetheart wrote:

a little, yes. pil pipe dioesnt have to go underground, but its safer if it does. Its very small so a very narrow trench is enoough
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Well not really, depends where the tank for the oil is and how fare it is away from the boiler.
The other pipes are just water of the hot kind inside the hous betweent he boiler and radiators. Probably a closed system in the loop or may well have an expansion tank in the loft. Brian
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On 31/07/2017 09:29, sweetheart wrote:

You need a microbore (~1/4 inch) pipe from the tank to the boiler.
It's the pipes _inside_ the house that will cause all the disruption. You need two between each radiator and the boiler - though with careful planning they can be shared.
Andy
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On 31/07/2017 21:00, Vir Campestris wrote:

Its not as disruptive if you run them in plastic microbore. No joints and easy to bend. The modern stuff is quite happy on a pressurised system.
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Then presumably the pipes to the radiators will have to be brought through floors walls and ceilings? ( by putting holes in them?)
I know that sounds over simple but am, I right? So in other words major disruption and mucking up of walls and decorations etc?.... and a lot of making good again?
How about the pipe from the tank and the pipe from the boiler? Underground - dig up the ground to put them in?
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Yes, but not as much making good as you may imagine, at least not to the walls. The pipes generally run under floors, so all you see is pipes popping up through the floor, directly below the radiators. That does mean lifting carpets, floor boards etc. All bets are off if you have solid floors.
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On 31/07/2017 09:36, sweetheart wrote:

Pretty much. It is possible to conceal almost all pipework, including feeds to the radiators, with a bit of lateral thinking and some work/mess.

The extent of the work depends in large part on the construction of your house and neatness of the installation. Solid floors and walls would mean surface mounting I'd have thought.

The oil is delivered by tanker, so that would need access. Then a small pipe from tank to boiler for oil - might need a small trench, depends where it's located. Then the boiler heats water, which circulates around the radiators.
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On 31/07/17 09:36, sweetheart wrote:

Yes. A LOT.
And the better a final job you make, the more distruptive it is, like e.g. taking up floors to lay pipes under then rather than across te skirtings.

Yup, mostly
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ugh floors walls and ceilings? ( by putting holes in them?)

disruption and mucking up of walls and decorations etc?.... and a lot of m aking good again?

und - dig up the ground to put them in?

I have mice under the floor. I have spent years trying to get rid of them a nd now I have managed to seal them out completely ( although I know they ar e still there as when a door was replaced they found their way into the kit chen again. Holes in floors means room for the little blighters to invade d oesnt it?
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 02:36:40 -0700 (PDT), sweetheart

Well get the holes sealed up around the pipes and cables properly sealed after installation then, but here we go again. This group can only offer you suggestions , it cannot prevaricate on your behalf as you go through the pros and cons of the advice given finding an excuses not taking up any suggestions given because of other issues implementing them will incur. Such discussions have led to you being accused of troll behavior in the past.
So to simplify you are you asking . Can I install oil fired central heating without having to do any other incidental works that most have to do as part of the task.
Answer . NO
G.Harman
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On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 11:01:04 AM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

Thank you. I am not trolling - anyone who has read my posts enough would un derstand the problems I have and why I need often to ask questions. I am so rry if some people find that annoying. I gbuess I am an annoying person but that isnt the same as being a troll. Trolling as I understand it is to pos t inflamatory and discordant opinions to stirr up troubkle.
Asking for a b it of information and trying to clarify what is involved is just me being a bit female of a certain age and in the opinion of some peo ple ( males mostly) a bit silly/ ill informed.
I have looked on the internet for my answers but the information given is q uite scant in quite scant when it comes to the nitty gritty brutal stuff of how things have to be done.
Thank you for the reply anyway. I hope I have clarified things for people. Bear with me.
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On 31/07/2017 11:00, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

You said your home is a bungalow. If you don't mind two pipes running down the wall to every radiator the plumbing could mostly be in the loft. The down pipes are often easily placed next to windows behind the open curtains.
Oil boilers can be quite compact, no larger then a 600mm kitchen wall cupboard, but would have to be mounted on an outside wall.
The tank is the big bit and has to be accessible to the delivery tanker. The oil supply pipe doesn't have to be 100% underground. It can be clipped along the outside wall of the house, garage, whatever.
Mike
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That is a very good suggestion and would reduce the cost a lot.

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