Electrical 16th Ed quals question

I see electrical jobs for electricians often as for "IEE 16th Edition
wiring regulations". Does that mean there is some course that
qualifies someone to "have" that? Or is that what CGLI 2360 parts I &
II is intented to cover? If so why specify the 16th Ed separately?
thx
Reply to
dave
Although all approved electricians will have passed their C&G, not all will keep their qualifications up to date. Indeed, there are many electricians who spend their entire working life doing mechanical engineering (i.e. tray, trunking, conduit, drilling holes, making stuff out of Unistrut, mounting panels on the wall and pulling cables). They will not get involved in design or specification or testing and often will not do much termination either. Other electricians will concentrate more on the technical aspects of electrical engineering and, for example, may not have installed a single length of steel conduit or metre of pyro since the day they finished college.
Obviously as the IEE wiring regs get amended, electricians need to go on refresher courses and get a certifiacte to demonstrate that they are up to speed with the latest regulations. Employers who need all-round electricians who can design, erect and test need to make sure their electricians have passed the "16th Edition course". Colleges will soon be offering "17th edition courses" and many electricians will be sent on these courses by their employer or (if self employed) will have to fork out the cash themselves.
HTH Rumble
Reply to
Dave Osborne
C&G 2381.
I think 2381 was originally intended as an update course for those who'd done their qualifications under earlier editions.
Reply to
Andy Wade
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That has gone up in price a bit!
Is that the perfect bound edition or the loose leaf one?
Reply to
John Rumm
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Actually it's come down a little, they were quoting the full £65 when I placed my order. But compared to the 16th, yes, twice the price. But this one's more harmonised and there is quite a lot more of it - didn't you download the public draft?
Doubtless there'll be a new set of Guidance Notes, OSG, EGBR and commentary to buy eventually - probably 200 quid for a full set.
I'm assuming it will be bound (limp cover) but now you mention it the Amazon site doesn't say. We do know the cover will be red though :-)
Reply to
Andy Wade
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I did... and freed it from its DRM encumbrances...
Not sure there was enough there to justify the 50% price rise though...
I find my electronic version more useful than the paper ones anyway, since half the time you know roughly what you are looking for and just can't seem to find it!
Thought we had red not so long ago?
Reply to
John Rumm
On Wed, 16 Jan 2008 02:40:54 +0000 someone who may be John Rumm wrote this:-
At least 15 years ago, perhaps 20.
Reply to
David Hansen
On 15 Jan 2008 23:33:57 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew
The reason I started this thread is that I was toying with the idea (not toying any more), of maybe doing some part-time domestic electrical work. As I am totally out of date (and well aware of it thanks), having done a 5 year electrical apprenticeship in the late 70's. It was an industrial elec/electronic apprenticship and was mainly 3ph industrial wiring/switchgear/motor controller and some substation work. I did do some domestic work, wiring houses/ring main stuff etc - but not a lot.
So... now with time on my hands I naively thought I'd like to do the occasional job (additional sockets/lights you-name-it) and see the industry is now (it seems to me) very tightly regulated.
Understandable I suppose, especially from a safety point of view and even though I'm getting on I do still take a pride in my work. Clearly I have a lot of revision to do to be able to ensure compliance. Hence my OP. Basically gawd know how I could get from here to um, there.
The CG course I did all those years ago (5 years day release) is of course history now. Although from the bits n pieces I see and read there is much unchanged. Maybe no-one told the electrons about all these new rules :-)
Anyway I'm, rambling (yawn), so as a followup, what would you chaps well versed and up to date in these things advise? I'm ready for the abuse and **ck off and things like that - but this group does seem largely above that kind thing. I ask in hope anyway. I only really want to do it for a) interest, b) keep active - I'm pretty fit still c) earn some extra money.
Is it still possible to setup as a part-time self-employed electrician? I thought a dodge way to do this work may be to try and get enpolyed by a company who are themselves certified and avoid me having to re-qualify. But I don't like the sound of that and don't want the involvement either. OTOH to pay for all the certification and to have to sit a 1/2 year course is not possible for me. Seems the option for such electricians isn't there any more? A pity really.
Reply to
dave
Taking on board your wants and don't wants, I would suggest finding a one man qualified electrician who needs a mate every now and then and who might then certify any private work you did for a percentage (assuming you get on OK). Otherwise you have identified the only two options - lots of work to get the correct status or join a company. Sorry!
Reply to
Bob Mannix

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