Elec Car, BBC v Tesla

Interesting little snippet I came across:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/01/18/bbc_tesla_edinburgh_e_car_shenanigans /
The truth will out :-) Don
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/Elec-Car-BBC-v-Tesla-701863-.htm DA wrote:
Donwill wrote:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/01/18/bbc_tesla_edinburgh_e_car_shenanigans /
Which truth? That UK (and everyone else) lacks charging stations?
\"We hold these truths to be self-evident...\"
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Even if there were charging stations every 50 yards, the technology is insufficiently mature. Or, in more, er, aggressive terms, it sucks.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/Elec-Car-BBC-v-Tesla-701863-.htm DA wrote: Huge wrote:

The only way any technology improves is through use. No use = sucky technology. But charging is only a part of it. Little noise, high torque, lower fuel (energy) cost, and little to no maintenance of the electrical vehicle are all playing role.
Basically, the entire article is about how stopping for charging slows you down. This concept sounds like a no-brainer to me. Of course you have to plan your route if your range is limited for one reason or another. As one commenter pointed out, you would not cross Pacific Ocean (8 255nm shortest trip) in an A320 (3,300 nm average range), you have to plan your route and stop for refueling twice.
We've been conditioned to expect that a car can take us 500 km away at any moment we wished. That hasn't always been the case and that's going away now. If for no other reason, you at least have to stop and think about paying for all the gas that you'll use on the trip. Thinking a little ahead and considering if your car has enough charge for the trip also seems like a reasonable thing to ask of the driver.
You don't really need charging stations every 50 yards. But for most trips one at home and one at the destination point (and a few along the route for just in case) would make the trip a lot easier. So, yeah, we do lack charging stations, most especially high power fast charging ones. And no one argues that a new, faster charging type of batteries is not needed. It's just that they won't be developed if there is no demand, and EVs create the demand.
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But at lease these "refuelling" stops add little time. Refuelling an electric car takes a long (or longer) than it did to use up the "fuel" that you gain from each stop increasing the journey time by 200%.
tim
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On 22/04/2011 18:35, tim.... wrote:

What you need is a car that runs on Rechargable DDDDDDDDD Cells. As they get low you pull into the filling station where your set are ejected and begin recharge, and a fully charged set are installed. In 30 hours time, your ejected set can be rotated into the next car that pulls in.
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John Rumm wrote:

The GM EV1 used many AA sized cells didn't it? It becomes an ownership issue. who's to say what the charge tretention is of the exchanged set, what if the older battery has a higher internal resistance.
Having said that with no tax and low insurance cost a EV shopping cart would suit my wife in the summer, trouble is capital cost is higher than a cheap petrol engined car for the 10 or so miles she does in a day.
AJH
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What we really need is to dump the idea of batteries, and work on a more efficient heat engine or fuel cell for the primary power.
Electrical transmission is fine as it stands but the electrical to chemical conversion and back again is not the real long term answer to this problem.
Its not anywhere there as yet but given sufficient time.
Some sort of inductive power transmission from vehicle to car might allow a better system involving batteries as the power to drive the car is from external means, and then the battery can go "off grid" for the bits of road that aren't so equipped.....
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On 22/04/2011 21:14, tony sayer wrote:

Car with a built in nuke genset?
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John Rumm wrote:

Now you are talking..
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A friend of mine altered one of those "Nuclear power? No thanks" bumper stickers so it read "Nuclear powered. No tank".
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On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 23:29:24 +0100, John Rumm

Many moons ago someone did produce a prototype electric car that incorporated a small diesel generator (basically the V twin engine from a small dumper truck). The idea was to charge the batteries from the mains as normal but also to run the diesel generator at a fixed (very efficient) load/throttle setting so it acted as a range extender. Using lead acid batteries (this pre-dated Lithium by decades!) it gave a useful range of a few hundred miles and average fuel efficiency of 100MPG or better.
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wrote:

You can order a car that operates like that, only 30k with the subsidy.
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On Sat, 23 Apr 2011 19:43:09 +0100, "dennis@home"

This was a bit more cunning than a Pius. The diesel ran at the same load all the time (you can make a very efficient engine if you do this) and did nothing but charge the batteries. The only motor was the electric one/s. The theory was that the load on the battery varied during a journey so the diesel, running at the same load setting all the time, was more effective than it would be if it was driving the car directly. Its power needed to be nearer the average required rather than the peak required.
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wrote in message

I was thinking of an Ampera, electric motor on each wheel, runs for about 60 miles on battery and has an IC engine and generator to give extended range.

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That was your first mistake. What was your second?
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Gas Turbine?
e.g.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1316273/E-Type-Jaguar-supercar-200mph-electric-hybrid-jet-engine-costs-200K.html
Shame about the cost though...
Gordon
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On 22/04/2011 21:14, tony sayer wrote:

Maybe, but there's quite a bit of work going on investigating the opportunities for a large number of electric vehicles providing mass storage for generated electricity (see "Windfarms paid to shut down").
Cars connected up to car-park charging units during the day acting as a national resource for storage of electrical energy. Then driven home and connected to the charging units there, where their stored charge can be used to top up the evening peak demand, with the drawn charge 'repaid' later in the night.
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OG wrote:

well you should have followed my discourses there.
In short, 25% of the world total known lithium reserves would keep the UK grid going for 45 hours if put into 27 million cars.

It's utter greenwash, as the figures above show.
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On 04/05/2011 20:09, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Why?
Do they?
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