Dri master condensation unit?

I know I am always banging on about the condensation issue I have. I have tried many things but I came across this "Drimaster" thing by accident .
Can someone explain in simpletons terms a) what it is b) how it works ( seen dozens of diagrams about air flow and understoond nothing) c) is it expensive to fit? d)how is it fitted? e) does it work?
We had been considering cavity wall insulation but this time of year the kitchen external wall ( North) is virtually streaming with water. Dehumidifier helps but it isn't a real solution.
Thanks.
(we have a detached bungalow in the Tamar Valley and its very wet here. No gas mains and all electric)
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sweetheart laid this down on his screen :

Which seems to be a NZ based company and all it seems to do is provide ventilation.

Warm air can support more moisture in the air than can cold. Warm moist air hits a colder surface and the moisture condenses out on the surface. Thee fix is to increase the surface temperature (warmth and insulation) and /or reduce the amount of moisture in the warm air - extract the moist air, cure the source of the moisture and /or dehumify.
To prevent moisture in the atmosphere - don't dry clothes in the house without some special arrangement to remove the moisture. Use a cooker hood which extracts moisture to the outside, always fit lids on pans when simmering food - it saves fuel and moisture in the air. Fit an extract fan in the bathroom and make sure it always runs when the bath or shower are used.
We dry clothes in a small utility room, which has a flat roof and just double brick walls (no cavity) using washing lines, a fan and a dehumidifier - rather than using the drier. Even the heaviest items dry overnight and we never get any moisture appearing on the walls.
This house used to be cold and suffer damp. Central heating, good insulation, good double glazing and extractor fans in appropriate places now mean it is as dry as a bone, never cold and heating bills are low.

Even more reason to sort out some proper insulation.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Thanks but everything else is insulated. Just finished new widows and doors ( cos I was told this might sort the problem) Roof insulation done The cavity walls were left because of the condensation issues. In fact probably the condensation is a result of being over insulated.
In fact things might be worse now than before vis condensation - and it is condensation. I have had this confirmed by a surveyor.
Short of dying I cant see any other ways we can now reduce the moisture in the air as it seems its just a product of being alive.
The dri master thing is being sold here locally by a firm in Devon ( not NZ - although it may be an NZ import) as a permanent solution to condensation.
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 16:38:36 -0000, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

They lied. Fitting new windows and doors will have exacerbated the problem as they would reduce natural ventilation in the bungalow.

Cavity wall insulation would have been the one thing which helped and would have been more effective than new windows.

No, it is a result of under heating and under ventilation.

Of course, what little ventilation you had has been reduced by the new doors and windows.

It's a product of inadequate ventilation and inadequate heating. As long as you have both of these you will have condensation. It is very simple to cure.

Unless you change your lifestyle it won't achieve anything. If you change your lifestyle you won't need it.
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Except I wastold I would be better not having Cavity wall insulation ( this was the energy grants thing) because of the condensation.

It may well be under heating . I have an eco warrieor OH ( as I have said before). He follows the government advice to the letter ( turn down heating etc) - and what we have is a effectively a mess. When I used to have the heating on in winter we didnt have condensation like now.
Then OH retired and we had a recession and everyone was supposed to be " poor and .... we got advice to turn down for " green reasons" and now I have a problem.
What needs sorting out is the governemtn advice to be frank ( because t**** like my OH take them too seriously) Rant over

With respectyou dont know my lifestyle to make that comment. I have done absolutely everything to minimise condensation. I do not dry indoors if I can help it ( I run the washing machine and a condensing intergral dryer once a week. I hardley ever cook except on Sunday lunch times.
I dont use water , boil a kettle or anything else very often ( conscious of how it affects the kitchen)
The kitchen is cold. It is not heated. There is no heat source there. There is a dehumidifier because I put it there.
But clearly the dri master wont do much more than the dehumidifier does now
I know heat cures it. But I am not allowed to have heat on.
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sweetheart pretended :

That is simply wrong advice. Lack of insulation makes for colder surfaces, colder surfaces is where it will condense. Warmth and good insulation will help, but you also need to keep the interior airs moisture level down to acceptable levels, by ventilating sources of moisture as close to the sources as possible.
People do exhale some moisture, but by far the worse sources are washing, cooking and bathing.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Thanks for the advice but I have done all of that and I still get condensation. I cant have wall insulation now as grants have been stopped - so that is that as they say.
I cook once a week ( around an hour. I use a microwave or toaster the rest of the time - and that is that. I am not in during the day Mon - Friday. I wash once a week . I never dry clothes indoors.
The bathroiom does not suffer from condensation. Its only the kitchen - and only the one wall.
The advice of Cornwall Country Council was to keep all the windows open permanently. It seems a lot of people have condensation and mould down here.
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 18:17:25 -0000, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

You were told wrongly.

No he doesn't, I doubt if either of you even know where to find it.
The Energy Saving Trust advice is "Your room thermostat should be set to the lowest comfortable temperature - typically between 18C and 21C. "
They also say :-
"5.4 Under-heating When a home is not properly heated, the internal surface temperatures of the external walls and roof can be very low, particularly if the building is not adequately insulated. When the warm moist air circulating within the property comes into contacts with the cold surfaces, it is chilled and less able to carry moisture. This results in surface condensation.
The problem of under-heating is often exacerbated by poor ventilation. Moisture is put into the air inside the home by the residents cooking and bathing, drying clothes and simply just breathing. This moisture can be readily removed from the air (ie by extract fans in kitchens and bathrooms or flues on heating appliances); if it is not, then the risk of surface condensation is increased."
You might want to try to read the following Energy Saving Trust documents :-
http://www.hillingdon.gov.uk/media.jsp?mediaid"603&filetype=pdf (page 7 onwards)

Precisely. Now you know the solution.

You were not told to turn off the heating nor were you told to keep it at such a level that condensation was inevitable.
Don't blame the government for you and your partners inability to read. The World Health Organization's standard for warmth says 18C is suitable for healthy people who are appropriately dressed. For those with respiratory problems or allergies, they recommend a minimum of 16C and for the sick, disabled, very old or very young, a minimum of 20C .

No, what needs to be sorted out is you and your idiot partner. Where does this "government advice" tell you to turn of the heating completely or keep it at levels where condensation occurs?

You have explained it in tedious detail over some years and steadfastly refused to accept all advice on solving the problem.

No you haven't.

Condensing combined washer dryers put litres of water per load into the room they are in.

You don't shower or bathe?

Try heating it.

It will do considerably less, it is only a small fan and relies upon the rooms below being maintained at an adequate temperature.

So live with your soggy partner and wet walls and stop winging. There isn't another solution which will work.
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wrote> No he doesn't, I doubt if either of you even know where to find it.

Then you think worongly. I went to the energy saving trust. They told me I should not have cavity wall insulation. They said a lot of things.
I also did their web site " energy test" and despite their 21 degrees arguement , the calculations would place us well above any eco values if we followed them. So much for their " knowledge.
After having spoken to an advisor of theirs on the phone, I lost all faith in anything they say. he knew less than I did.
We have poor ( in fact NO ventilation since we bubble wrappedthe house to " save energy costs" . I acknowledge that.) The extractor fan in the kitchen does nothing . It would have to be on all the time ( like the dehumidifier. )
It does seem to ease up when its warmer outside or when its dry. The rain doesnt help at all - and its barely stoped raining for the last three years.
( dont think I am stupid because I ask a lot of questions. I am just lacking in an decent education)
The fact is, I suspect,like many things these quangos wereset up with half baked ideas. People like my OH and his predecessor her, took them up. Then the problems started and then they revised their ideas at the quango, but the problem remains .
They are stuck now with just one thing " dont breathe". I know DIYers will not believe that but it is the reality here.

Yeah, I know what they say. I spoke to them. They are less knowledgeable than I am if you get their " advisors" They just read off a set text.

I changed my lifestyle and the " breathing" bit is the only bit of all of that left that is done in this house. Its their stock answer and its just plain wrong - self evidently since I cannot deal with the problem.
It is condensation and it only on the one wall. Taking the pantry down has helped but not cured this. Instead of water dripping down all the walls of the pantry, its now just the outide wall on the end.
When I find the solution, I will have to let you know. Until then, thanks for the advice. I do value it. It gives me ideas as to what else and which direction I need to move next in persuit of sorting this.
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sweetheart wrote:

You've been told the solution many times. You need to increase the ventilation and increase heat usage to maintain relative hunidity indoors at a low level, which will reduce the dew point on the exterior walls. This will cure your condensation problems.
It's a problem I've seen many times in student (and pensioners') accommodation where they close all the ventilation off and turn heat down to save money. Open even a small window a crack or install some permanent vents, such as an airbrick in the worst affected rooms, and turn the heat up a touch, and the problem goes away as if by magic. I did it once in a *very* stuffy 19th Century house in Shepherds Bush by removing the blanking plate at the back of a hearth. The effect was immediate, and noticed by the clients within seconds.
--
Tciao for Now!

John.

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You have hit the nail on the head. OH lost his job and we have to live like " pensioners"
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On Mon, 14 Jan 2013 08:29:34 -0000, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

Try reading
http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/Heating-and-hot-water/Thermostats-and-controls
That is where the quotation came from.
>I went to the energy saving trust.

Why did they say you should not have cavity wall insulation? What other things did they say?

What is an "eco value"?

So where do you think all the moisture generated within the house is going to go? Stopping ventilation does not reduce energy costs.

It really is very simple. You have two choices, both of which will eliminate the condensation problem quickly and reliably.
The first is to turn off the heating completely and to leave all the windows open permanently. If you can reduce the inside temperature of the house to be the same as outside you will get no condensation.
The second is to improve ventilation and raise heating levels.
Nothing else will work. It really is that simple.
The amount of condensation in the bungalow depends upon three factors:
1. how much water vapour is produced by the actions of its residents 2. how cold or warm the bungalow is. 3. How much ventilation there is.
You have reduced the first but have either done nothing about the other two or made things worse such as by fitting double glazing.
As you are repeatedly told, all three factors must be addressed, not just one.

It is not asking questions but a refusal to listen to answers which is a better indication of intelligence.

Not where it mattered you didn't.

You cannot deal with the problem because you steadfastly refuse to do what is necessary to solve it. As long as you continue to do that the problem will continue.

You have been told the solution many times by many people but refuse to listen. As long as you continue to refuse to listen and refuse to take the simple steps necessary to solve the problem it will remain and you will have to live with it.
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wrote

http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/Heating-and-hot-water/Thermostats-and-controls
They said we could not have cavity wall insulation because we had to deal with the condensation first.
They said we would have to have a loan under the green deal.
They said they wouldpass us on to a company in our area who was authorised to do work under the green deal ( thats where this dri master started)
They said we could have three AAA tripple glazed windows as the deal.
We could have a boiler ( cant!)
We could have loft insultation ( got it)
But not cavity wall insulation as it was not available to us and it wouldnt suit because of the condensation..

This was that calculator thing that could determine if you were saving enough to be " green" My estimation of playing with that is hardly anyone can match the criteria for " saving enough" unless they a) have one bath a week ( only one if two of you - then its one bath a fortnight!)
b) have a dishwasher but only use it twice a week
c) wash clothes once a week.
d) dry everything elsewhere ( outside or dont wash if it rains).
..... I have cut almost everythintg to this for the condensation anyway ,what we areleft with is breathing.

"
Its not practical is it? OH wont pay the bills and I am not sure we could afford them. So I guess the answer is open the windows and live in the cold?
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"sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote in message wrote

I forgot to add they also told us we could have draught proofing ( and yet you all tell me its lack of ventilation that causes the problem - so just make sure we have even less ventilation then? So much for the energy trust.
They also told us to get a water meter - and frankly, even SWW told us a water meter would not save us anything on that.
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On Jan 14, 11:49am, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

Given your frugal lifestyle, a water meter will probably save you a fortune. But I guess that's just another piece of advice you will ignore.
MBQ
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Given your frugal lifestyle, a water meter will probably save you a fortune. But I guess that's just another piece of advice you will ignore.
Frugal it maybe but I have little choice. I would hate to feelthat I dare not use water if I wanted to because that too had to be read daily and cut down when it went up a penny over what OH decided was allowed ( or above what they energy trust says is your carbon footprint).
Let someone else save the bloody planet as far as I am concerned. So, if you dont mind,I will not take your advice.
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On 1/14/2013 11:46 AM, sweetheart wrote:

If I remember correctly, you are still employed - tell him it's _your_ money you are spending on heating your home. You might also suggest that constant damp isn't good for the structure of the building or its contents (human contents included), and 'saving' money by skimping on heat, could actually be more expensive in the long run.
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On Jan 14, 4:46pm, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

It's not about being frugal. A family of two will almost certainly save a fortune even without reducing water usage, just by having a meter fitted. Our bill was *halved* for a family of 5 when we had a meter fitted.
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On Jan 14, 4:46 pm, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

save a fortune even without reducing water usage, just by having a meter fitted. Our bill was *halved* for a family of 5 when we had a meter fitted>>>>
No it wont. We have a septic tank and so pay very little water rates ( own drains and land drains and sewerage). SWW make a charge for metered water that includes sewerage and they themselves have said that no water meter could end up lower than our current rated water
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On Tue, 15 Jan 2013 21:13:01 -0000, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

I don't think that's true. If they don't provide a service they should not be charging for it. Although they have a terrible web site this
http://southwestwater.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/172
says
"From April 1st 2012, the volume charge (per cubic metre) of water is 1.95 (this applies to measured customers only).
If your property is connected for both water and sewerage you can calculate the total unit cost of supplying, disposing and treating your water by adding the relevant sewerage volume charge below to the water volume charge.
The volume charge (per cubic metre) - foul, surface and highway is 3.30 The volume charge (per cubic metre) - foul and highway is 3.03"
which quite clearly says that you should not be charged for sewerage and surface water disposal if they don't provide it. Your contact in SWW was talking rubbish.
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