Do smoke alarms become more sensitive with age?

My tenant says that the smoke alarm in the hall goes off when she has a shower and that the one in the kitchen goes off when she fries things. The alarms are mains interlinked and about 6 years old, this hasn't been a problem before. She is the sensible type but I don't want to replace them only to find that the problem still exists. I'm busy reading past posts on smoke alarm problems/different types etc but thought that I would post this in the meantime, maybe save some time. Thanks in advance.
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On Thursday, 18 October 2018 20:44:13 UTC+1, Rednadnerb wrote:

you didn't tell us which type of alarm they are. But generally no, they don't get touchy
NT
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Don't know what types but will check.
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Well if anything I've found quite the opposite. I think the ones based on a radioactive isotope lose sensitivity, but not other types. I do not know whether a component in the circuit could drift and make the threshold lower. I guess its possible. Mine has always gone off if I cremate the toast a bit too much, but the main variable seems to be draught, ie, if there is one past the alarm to an open window, for example, then its more likely to go off. Brian
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These are both scenarios which will trigger both radioactive and optical smoke detectors.
You generally wouldn't fit one of these in a kitchen, but you would fit a temperature triggered alarm, either an absolute temperature trigger or a rate of temperature rise alarm.
For the shower, this means steam is getting out into the hall. Is there an extractor fan in the shower room and does it work? Excess moisture getting out into the rest of the house on a regular basis might have other effects too, such as mold forming in cold spots.
Also for the kitchen, is there an extractor hood over the hob, and does it work? When were the filters last cleaned or changed? A functioning cooker hood will reduce the amount of air-borne fat when frying, which will reduce chance of smoke detector going off and reduce the grease which forms on all surfaces/decorations.
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On 19/10/2018 09:57, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

My smoke alarms have always behaved like this.
Too much fat smoke or too much steam set em off
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On Friday, 19 October 2018 09:57:47 UTC+1, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
shower and that the one in the kitchen goes off when she fries things.

n a problem before.

that the problem still exists.

but thought that I would post this in the meantime, maybe save some time.

yes, so they're probably battery powered & thus probably ioninsation ones. In which case they're very touchy, and the solution is to move them a bit f urther away from the smoke/steam until they no longer false alarm. This inf o was on the wiki before it got deleted.
NT
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The OP said "mains"
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Still seems to get a mention
"Optical smoke detectors [...] may give a false alarm if exposed to steam and should not be located close to poorly ventilated bathroooms"
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On Friday, 19 October 2018 12:42:19 UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:

so that's not mentioning it.
NT
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No I'd say a smoke alarm that can be triggered by a kitchen is a must. My old granny used to regularly put her tea cosy on the hob without turning it completely off resulting in almost a fire. Brian
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On Friday, 19 October 2018 13:29:18 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:

But triggered by what in the kitchen ?

So it would almost create smoke would almost smoke trigger the alarm ?

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On 19/10/2018 13:33, whisky-dave wrote:

Usually this would be one with some temperature trigger rather than smoke.

What is your issue?
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On Friday, 19 October 2018 13:48:57 UTC+1, Fredxx wrote:

So wouldn't it be better to have a heat detector in teh kitchen rather than a smoke detector.

What is the problem of granny putting a tea cosy on the hob ? Surely that is what needs avoiding rather than waiting for the cosy to catch fire and produce smoke so it triggers a smoke detector. If this happened every week wouldn;t it be better finding another solution ?
But don't forget that where you place them is important too.
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Better to have both and easily cancellable.

It can end up burning the house down.

Easier said than done.

Unlikely that she'd forget to turn the hob off that often.

Trouble is that there isnt one. Not even feasible to make her use an electric kettle instead of the hob to make the tea etc.

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On Friday, 19 October 2018 15:00:50 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

So show me them .

So train her not to put a tea cosy where it shouldn't go.
A fire alarm will NOT stop the house burning down.

What makes yuo think that, the hob could eb a place where she has always but the tea cosy.

Therree is if yuo think about it.

why not.

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What makes sense is irrelevant to what is buyable currently, fuckwit.

Easier said than done with those with dementia, stupid.

Corse it can when it makes it obvious to others in the house that the silly cow has just done it again and stops the cosy from setting fire to the house.

That sort of forgetfulness doesn’t happen every time they make a cuppa.

Yes, but she normally would turn the hob off when taking the kettle off it, fuckwit.

Wrong, as always.

Because the only way to do that would be to physically remove the kettle that goes on the hob and even if that is done, she'd just buy another next time she goes shopping, stupid.
Thanks for that completely superfluous proof of why you only ever get to clean the dunnys.

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On Saturday, 20 October 2018 00:42:28 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

Seems like it in your world.

rm

So you think the only problem in a hosue with someone with dementia is wher e they put the tea cosy ?

what others ?

Fire alarms don't stop cosys catching fire.

How many times does it have to happen ?

"normally" peolple don't set fire to theri own residence.

what's wrong with using an electric kettle one that deosn't need a gas flam e or hot hob ? It also can switch itself off as an extra advantage.

I'm begining to think this old person that can't use any oither kettle is actually you.

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On Fri, 19 Oct 2018 06:28:33 -0700, whisky-dave wrote:

Indeed. I have a heat rise detector in ours.
Mix of ionisation and optical for the other five.
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On Friday, 19 October 2018 22:46:45 UTC+1, Bob Eager wrote:

Heat & rate of rise detectors alert much later than ionisation & optical. Ionisation & optical detect fires before they begin but are prone to false alarms. If you position the latter correctly they don't false alarm - that's the best option.
NT
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