Do I need a new SCMS?

Having built around 25 decks, my Axminster White SCMS is in a bad way & needs replacing. I'm in a quandary, do I buy an ALDI el cheapo and replace as necessary or shell out on a decent brand for long term?
Spot on 100% accuracy isn't essential, its only used for decking - trimming 150 x 47 softwood or 147 x 28 deck boards.
I'm now thinking do I need an SCMS at all? I have the idea of making up a 'sawboard' with a right angle fence (I think Dennis mentioned this idea) and using a circular saw.
I don't mind buying a new power tool :-) but its not just the cost.
An SCMS is a bulky & heavy item to store & squeeze into the van and involves double handling of the timber very often. I don't use a stand for the SCMS because that often involves lifting a 4.8m 150 x 47 and then holding it in place - PITA if you only have to trim 30cm off. Easier at floor level.
It occurs to me that a sawboard & circular saw could be taken to the timber, rather than taking the timber to the saw - I'd just need to support the end, clamp on the sawboard & cut. Probably quicker.
Anyone see any snags in this cunning plan?
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Dave - The Medway Handyman
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The Medway Handyman wrote:

I fancied one of these a while back after seeing a demo on a shopping channel (yes, I know!) was about 30. http://www.macboard.qc.ca / Can't find any for sale in the UK ATM though.
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R D S wrote:

Screwfix sell something similar http://www.screwfix.com/prods/24972/Hand-Tools/Carpenters-Jigs/TLC-Tru-Cut-Saw-Guide?cm_re=SEARCHPROMO-_-SAW%20GUIDE-_-24972
The downside is that the timber has to pass through the guide, I want something I can just drop on top & clamp.
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The Medway Handyman wrote:

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/24972/Hand-Tools/Carpenters-Jigs/TLC-Tru-Cut-Saw-Guide?cm_re=SEARCHPROMO-_-SAW%20GUIDE-_-24972
I think that's exactly the same, a bit much at 40 though IMO, though a new gadget might provoke a bit of DIY action.
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A square ply base with a strip at 90 degrees and an eccentric clamp made from a 100 mm disk of ply. Put it on, turn the disk to lock it and cut.
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dennis@home wrote:

Excellent! Thank you.
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On 8 Nov,

Looks a fairly easy DIY job.
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When I was doing a lot of 50*200 joists (80 or so), it was easier to slide each one of the end of the bundle (as dropped outside by the builders merchant), clamp on a right angle template (a bit like a bench hook) and use a hand held circular saw.
However that was when the alternative a basic DW700 DeWalt SCMS and its very basic leg stand. I used to use improvised supports for the long end of long timbers.
More recently, I took the plunge an bought the 12" Bosch SCMS and the bosch bench for it.
http://www.toolstop.co.uk/?option=shop&page=shop.product_details&product_id087&gclid=CMHqzqnh5ZYCFRyB1Qod81ppPQ
This is sufficient to support 4.8m timbers, and because the timber supports (one either end) and the saw are all on a common base - it's all completely level and square.
It's a lot of dosh, but has transformed the way I work. I now have a stack of 4.8m timbers at one end of the bench, and simply slide the next one off the top of the bundle and up onto the bench and snip off what I need.
I've found in practice I don't end up with a lot of short ends (because I always look at the odd bits stacked vertically first), and simply order another bundle from the BM's as necessary. By sticking to the largest size my bench can handle comfortably, I think I've got it as efficient as I can in terms of timber handling and simplified ordering.
So my advice is - if you replace your SCMS - budget for a bench (and you'll probably not want to go back to a handheld CS unless you have to).
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...and don't buy a cheap bench. I got a "free" one with Bosch saw from Axminster. It's still lying about here, if anyone wants it.
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wrote:

I can't see how is sufficient for 4.8m timber, it's just 3.7m long or 1.85m either side of the saw line. If lopping off say 100mm from a 4.8m length there will be 2.85m overhanging the end of the left hand support, more than enough for it to overbalance the free end.
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Mike wrote:

This is presumably partly why TMH is thinking saw to wood rather than wood to saw.
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stuart noble wrote:

Ferzacerly.
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You clamp the saw down at one end of the bench, and it's exactly 2.2m from the line of the blade to the furthest support.
(those pics of it with the saw in the middle is just the work of the clueless photographers)
I'm right-handed, so the saw is set at the extreme right of my bench (of the non-extendable area) and just as you would normally press the timber against the back fence with your left hand - so you do with a slightly overlength timber, to support it during & after the cut.
In practice, you would very rarely trim 100mm from one end of a 4.8m timber anyway.
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snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com wrote:

Quite common when deck building, granted 100mm isn't common, but cutting a sort length (250-300mm) is. Depends what the supplier has in stock & how big the deck is.
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Lol - but next to never do you cut a 100mm to *use* from a 4.8m timber - you cut it from your heap of short oddments.
You might occasionally trim a 4.8m to a 4.7m - and that's perfectly doable on those benches.
For studding it's preferable to have long timbers for headers and footers (but rarely longer than 4.8m) and slightly less than 2.4m in standard height rooms (or all bloody sorts in my chapel - up to 4.2m) and then lots of noggins a little under 600mm.
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snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com wrote:

Sorry, should have said 'trim off'. I do cut a lot of 400mm noggins though.
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The Medway Handyman wrote:

That is the sort of job the bench is very good fir I find. Set an end stop, load up a few lengths of timber, chop, slide, chop etc producing several noggings per cut and loads of copies all to exact length.
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The Medway Handyman wrote:

As another alternative you may find you can replace bits of the existing one to return it to serviceable condition. Axminster sometimes have spares for these things.

You could do that with a 10" chop saw rather than a sliding one probably.

I can see the dilemma. Although I expect if you had one of the decent stands like Dom suggested you would find its actually quite a comfortable way of working. Using a sliding saw you can also stack up a pile of boards and cut a number at a time. The big SCMS will probably do 8 deck boards at a time for example.
(my 12" SCMS and stand is lovely to use for this sort of thing, but it is 'kin heavy to shift about. The Makita stand is nice and solid, but being steel rather than Ali is pretty heavy just by itself).

Could be in some cases. As could be laying a number of boards overlength and then trimming them all together with a hand held saw and a straight edge.
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John Rumm wrote:

I've checked that out & they did have most of the parts, but at a fairly high cost. Not far of the cost of a new Aldi or Titan one.

I've only seen one 250mm non slider that will cut a 150 x 47 and thats the Titan from SF. At 60 its cheap enough. Most will only cut 130 - 140mm.

Still got to double handle the timber - lift it up onto the saw, then down onto the floor. Plus getting the big stand into the van.

Easiest way is to trim the boards after they are laid, I use a sawbord & circ saw. If you plan things correctly you can buy the boards almost the right size - provided the supplier has that size in stock of course.
I spent an hour or so today mucking about with some 12mm ply & a strip of ally angle.
After a few trials I ended up with a saw board based cross cut jig that works a real treat. I have an old, but good, B&D circ saw with a 65mm dopth of cut, so with 12mm ply it still gives 53mm capacity.
I'll give it a try on the next deck (prolly next year by now) & see how it goes, but I reckon it will save time overall.
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I can recommend the SIP 10" extra wide saw. Cuts up to 68 x 160mm, and is solidly built and powerful.
It's this model http://www.tapltd.co.uk/index.php?app=gbu0&ns=prodshow&ref=X1506 although they have been available for less than that - an ebay seller had them on clearance for under 50 recently. It's basically the same as their 150 10" sliding saw without the slide.
A
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