DIY of sorts: roadside animal euthanasia

Encountered a badly injured deer (Muntjack, or perhaps a young regular one)
by the side of the road this evening. There was a car already pulled up by
it and the critter looked in a bad way (lots of blood around hindquarters,
including via back passage, bone visible, skin loss etc.). I was on the op
posite side of the road, but did a U turn, to head back to appraise and if
necessary, offer to finish it off. I cant bear to see a badly injured anima
l suffer a prolonged death.
By the time I got back to the scene, a couple of 20-odd year old lads had s
topped, with one cradling/stroking the twitching critter. The chap whose ca
r had hit it was also there, at a bit of a distance.
I offered my view that the animal was surely done for and suffering badly,
so the best thing would be to finish it off with a wrench or tyre iron. You
ng fellas did not like that idea and implied that I would be subject to som
e aggro if I attempted such. I'm not shy to get stuck in when circumstances
require it, but I didn't think that hastening the inevitable demise of a d
eer warranted it (wife in car, also, being an additional incentive to not s
tart aggro).
In the end, after explaining that the animal was clearly done for and that
it should be put out of its misery (to which the reply was (broad Yorkshire
) "'ow would you know?",I drove off.
Feeling a little guilty, now, leaving a dying critter twitching in pain. Wh
at would others here have done?
The bloke who hit the thing was in agreement that it should be finished off
.
Bill.
Reply to
bill.shitner
e) by the side of the road this evening. There was a car already pulled up by it and the critter looked in a bad way (lots of blood around hindquarter s, including via back passage, bone visible, skin loss etc.). I was on the opposite side of the road, but did a U turn, to head back to appraise and i f necessary, offer to finish it off. I cant bear to see a badly injured ani mal suffer a prolonged death.
stopped, with one cradling/stroking the twitching critter. The chap whose car had hit it was also there, at a bit of a distance.
, so the best thing would be to finish it off with a wrench or tyre iron. Y oung fellas did not like that idea and implied that I would be subject to s ome aggro if I attempted such. I'm not shy to get stuck in when circumstanc es require it, but I didn't think that hastening the inevitable demise of a deer warranted it (wife in car, also, being an additional incentive to not start aggro).
t it should be put out of its misery (to which the reply was (broad Yorkshi re) "'ow would you know?",I drove off.
What would others here have done?
Many, many years ago I hit a deer - despite going slowly enough to have mis sed others. I stopped, got out and amazingly enough the local "gamekeeper" chap responsible for them was yards away. He came, checked, decided it was hopeless, and very gently cut an artery its neck. In very little time it ju st stopped living. He had the sharp knife, knew where to cut, and wanted to avoid suffering.
Reply to
polygonum_on_google
On Sun, 17 May 2020 12:42:01 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
If you (one) have sufficient knowledge to accurately ascertain the likelihood of such an animal either surviving if left (highly unlikely in this case from the sound of it) or not suffering more by being treated, even if it survived ... and if you have sufficient skills to dispatch the animal humanely ... and you are allowed to make such a decision (protected species / livestock / pet etc) then you probably should.
The fact that many couldn't, even though the chances are they are meat eaters is part of the disconnection I would like to see re-connected.
The same people cradling a dying injured animal are then happily having perfectly healthy (if you are lucky) young animals slaughtered by the million every year and not batting an eyelid over it.
It's the same disconnection people apply when they 'throw something away' when they neither know nor care where that place is or drink that lactate of a different species, long after they have themselves weaned?
Cheers, T i m
Reply to
T i m
In article , snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com scribeth thus
FWIW I was once told by a serving RSPCA inspector that its very rarely a wild animal such as that will survive, they it seems don't run them to the vets mind you this was a while ago now.
Told me that they kept a humane killer in a locked box in the van for such occasions. Sounds like this one was too far gone from what you described, poor thing!
Reply to
tony sayer
Its a difficult one as its not so much a problem with you or anyone else finishing it off its a problem of other members of the public. While they were all doing the sympathy thing they could have rung rspca or something like that and asked for guidance. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa)
Many, many years ago my wife was in charge of a riding stables when a horse was hit by a car and more or less had one leg ripped off. In those days they kept a captive bolt pistol and she was able to dispatch it quickly. She was also once flown to Dublin nailed inside a crate with a race-horse, also with a gun for company.
Reply to
newshound
Simply dialling 999 and telling plod what had happened was all that was needed. All forces now have Armed response units permanently available, and in London and other places they are on the road at all times.
Reply to
Andrew
Oh dear.
The OP showed far more compassion for the welfare of the injured animal than those who use leads which administer electric shocks to dogs.
BTW, are you still eating plants and fruit etc? You do know that kills a living thing, don?t you?
Reply to
Brian Reay
Calling the police / RSPCA is probably the most sensible solution, unless you have the expertise etc. The worst outcome would be inflicting more suffering on the poor thing- even by well meant actions.
Reply to
Brian Reay
On Mon, 18 May 2020 12:41:02 +0000 (UTC), Brian Reay wrote:

Why don't you go back to goading people on the ukra group Brian, you might get better results with your trolling there?
Cheers, T i m
Reply to
T i m
Hmmm
unless there is a very real and present danger (to sound USian about it) to life and limb, a lethal shot seems (literally) overkill.
And that still doesn't answer my original question as to whether the police are *trained* in animal despatch. A task which I am going to hazard a guess (from seeing an elephants skull) might be trickier than it sounds. Unless you are using an RPG and don't care about it raining beef.
Reply to
Jethro_uk
Or contact the local vet.
Yeah, I don't mind dispatching rabbits but a deer is a much bigger animal, even a muntjac. I doubt that a normal wheel brace is big or heavy enough for the purpose. A bolt gun makes a big hole and mess, instantly...
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
Its going to be a lot better than a member of the general public bashing its head with the jack.
Reply to
Jake56
But is a lot easier to do than trying to round one of those up.
Don?t need to be when they are *trained* to kill people.
A task which I am going to
There arent a lot of elephants roaming the UK tho.
Its much easier to kill a deer that is lying on the ground.
The weapons that the armed response units have will kill a deer that is lying on the ground fine, with a head shot.
Reply to
Jake56
In message , Andrew writes
Umm.. 10ish one evening, I realised there was some unusual activity on our by-pass. Apparently a vehicle travelling home to Luton had hit and broken the leg of a Muntjac. The police had been called but were not present so I went home to fetch a rifle. When I got back with the gun, a woman police Sergeant refused to let me shoot it. Strictly she was quite correct as a sub-sonic hollow point 0.22 does not meet the impact energy required for Deer shooting. However the thing was standing on 3 legs about 5m away and a head shot easy. About an hour later I heard a thump...
Reply to
Tim Lamb
There is no ricochet, the bullet stays in the head or goes thru the head into the ground or tarmac.
Reply to
Jake56

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