DIY Cooking

Hi
A wallpaper seam roller makes a decent pastry roller for situations where the usual big roller wont do. Now I've got a lot of lemons to zest, and it strikes me that a manual wood rasp would probably do a much faster job of this than the traditional lemon zester.
Any other examples of DIY tools being good for cookery? I guess some kind of saw would be good for boned meat, there's the blowtorch for browning and caramelising, hammer and screwdriver for cutting up frozen foods... any others?
Regards, NT
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Drills for coconuts (to get the milk out)
| Hi | | | A wallpaper seam roller makes a decent pastry roller for situations | where the usual big roller wont do. Now I've got a lot of lemons to | zest, and it strikes me that a manual wood rasp would probably do a | much faster job of this than the traditional lemon zester. | | Any other examples of DIY tools being good for cookery? I guess some | kind of saw would be good for boned meat, there's the blowtorch for | browning and caramelising, hammer and screwdriver for cutting up | frozen foods... any others? | | | Regards, NT
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On Thu, 08 Apr 2004 13:24:09 +0000, Seri wrote:

And bandsaw to cut it up !!.. Only joking folks.
Dave
And you were born knowing all about ms windows....??
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N. Thornton wrote:

I use my plaster mixer and cordless drill to stirr the porridge in the mornings. What I hate though are all the crunchy bits I keep finding in it. My wife thinks that it's posh porridge with added crunchy bits.
D
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I sometimes could do with an SDS drill with attatched chisel bit to get through my wifes steak.

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On Thu, 8 Apr 2004 14:46:19 +0100, "-= debully =-"

;-)
Luckily my Wife think's dinner is something that's delivered on a moped so I'm safe there!
Talking of SDS again (I darent start another thread ..).
Whilst In B&Q earlier I noticed their SDS drills are now 23.99 or summat. They were very much different (lighter, smaller) than the Challenge one I got from Argos some weeks before this 'other' (cheapo) model came out.
I did notice on the box it mentioned a 'clutch' but no mention of a rotary stop?
Anyone got one (I think it was one of the 'Proline' models (or whatever their cheapo line's called))?
All the best ..
T i m
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

A Mole Wrench is wonderful for cracking nuts and for getting the meat out of crab claws. You can apply a very large force over a controlled distance without going on and smashing the whole thing to pulp.
It works the other way round to - I use my wife's self-lighting caramelising blowtorch to light my large plumbing model.
P.S. I hope you wash the fungicidal gunge off your wallpaper roller before using it on food!
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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wrote:> > A wallpaper seam roller makes a decent pastry roller for situations

Oh its never seen wallpaper, I got it for cooking. Just seems to be one more DIY item I use for cookery. Looks like some people thought I was kidding - funny maybe, but I've used quite a few diy tools on food :)
I dont know if the roller is dishwasher proof yet, but its cheap enough that I'm going to try some time. Gad ya compare kitchen implement prices with DIY, if I get poorer the kitchen will become the workshop too.
Regards, NT
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It always was here, until I screamed and raged and sulked and ... well I'm sure you know what I mean.
So was the sitting room (for dismantling the motor bike) and the dining room (for welding) ... there was nowhere left for me to extract my honey except the bathroom and to make my candles except the back bedroom ...
Mary

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I use my Electric Power Planer on the pig to make pork scratchings.
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Presumably you have to tie the pig down first?
Christian.
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Nah. Clamp it in the workmate.
Darren
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We couldn't have done that with our 4cwt pig ...
Mary

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You are what you eat.....
mike r
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Used to be a comedy series on ch4 called "home improvement" in it Tim Allen presented a spoof show called tool time and they had an episode about construction site cooking where a plumber made a grilled cheese sandwich using his blowtorch. Think its rerun on the Disney channel all the time.
Jon.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Since we're lapsing into nostalgia, my late father used to drive a steam roller (i.e. real steam - none of your diesel rubbish!) back in the 1920's. He told me how the workmen would keep the most recent new coal shovel for cooking and - using a little lard oil (supplied for some part or other of the steam engine) - would cook a breakfast of bacon and eggs over a roadside brazier.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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1920's.
roadside
My dad did that in the 1940s when he worked at a steel forge.
Mary
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Set Square wrote:

Standard railway practice, but the powers that be weren't happy, and began drilling a few holes in each shovel.
Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
snipped-for-privacy@cdixon.me.uk
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The shovels provided to steam locomotive crew by GWR reputedly had holes drilled in them to prevent them being used to cook a fried breakfast in the firebox.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
[email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
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On 9 Apr 2004 09:44:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

What a rotten trick.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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