"Disposable" paintbrush

snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's not always the amount of bristles that achieves the best job but the quality of the bristle. Cheap/disposable brushes don't possess the flag at the the end of bristle, or firmness to push the paint out which are necessary for a quality finish particularly in oil.

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I don't think we're supposed to know this. It ruins their profit margins.
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Bristles will fall out on first use even on an expensive brush which is why a decent brush needs the initial braking-in period usually performed on non quality work.
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On 06/03/2013 17:56, Major Scott wrote:

Hmm, you should talk to my missus. As far as she's concerned, *all* paintbrushes are disposable... "life's too short for cleaning bloody paintbrushes". Hence I stopped buying decent brushes :(
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wrote:

I sometimes don't wash them if I've used paint that needs white spirit to clean them. The brush is often cheaper than the white spirit.
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hem

^^^This.
My method of cleaning brushes:
1. Wipe off excess paint. 2. Put brush in suitable receptacle and fill with white spirit or brush cleaner. 3. Agitate thoroughly. 4. Put receptacle in shed or garage. 5. After appropriate period of time throw congealed mess in bin. 6. Buy new brushes. 7. Repeat as necessary.
--
Halmyre

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On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 00:57:10 -0800, Halmyre wrote:

So I'm not the only one who suffers from this solution. :-))
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Seriously? Cleaning a brush with white spirit is even easier than with water. What are you guys doing that makes it such a chore?
I understand doing this for Hammerite where you would otherwise need special thinners, or for applying nasty chemicals, but not for solvent-based paints. It negates their main advantage which is superior finish.
Alex
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On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 23:42:14 +0000, Alexander Lamaison

How do you then dispose of the contaminated "white spirit"?
I know that at one time we would just pour it down the kitchen sink...
Many years ago Dad would leave a paintbrush in an old jam jar of white spirit or turps for years until it just dried out and the whole lot had to be chucked away... :-)
Wasn't it "Polyclens" that was supposed to rejuvenate even rock-hard paintbrushes? Not cellulose-type stuff though, ISTR.

I've successfully cleaned Hammerite-infested brushes with MIBK, but it isn't a perfect solvent for that purpose. Again, disposal is a bit of a problem. The best idea for volatile solvents is to just let 'em disperse into the atmosphere, then put the crud (and possibly the brush!) into the wheelie-bin.
IMHO stuff like Hammerite is used for fairly rough type work such as garden gates, where a couple of bristles don't _really_ matter all that much.
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Frank Erskine

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Don't. Use two bottles of similar size. One with your clean white spirit in, the other to store the used remants. Eventually you will notice that the murky liquid in the second bottle has separated. The stuff on top is fairly clean white spirit. Once you run out of spirit in the clean bottle, pour the top layer from the second bottle into it. Start all over again.
Eventually your second bottle will get too full of sludge at which point you can just bin it and start with a new empty bottle.

Never leave a brush in a container, even just overnight. It splays the bristles, making it useless for painting. The exception is if you drill a hole through the brush and suspend the brush in the jar using a rod. This way the tip of the brush isn't pressing on anything.
Alex
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[Snip]

at one time, the better brushes used to have this hole in the when you bought them.
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On 08/03/2013 00:43, Frank Erskine wrote:

I find if you leave it to settle for a few days you can often pour the now clear spirit off the top and back into the bottle, then discard the sludge left at the bottom of the jar.
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wrote:

Don't clean a roller by directing a shower (or worse a karcher) at it. More things become dirty.
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If you use an expensive brush you would be able to use mineral Naphtha or as an alternative cellulose thinners, both these solvents will draw out the paint from the stock leaving it clean, turps won't do this hence the solidification of old paint in the brush.
However there is absolutely no point trying this on a disposable brush as it would not survive being cleaned in either solvent.
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I don't think they make much paint that doesn't come out with detergent any more.
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On 07/03/2013 08:57, Halmyre wrote:

That seems disturbingly familiar ;-)
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Well normally they are disposable as after a while they start leaving their hairy bits in the paint. Brian
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On Wednesday, March 6, 2013 5:56:59 PM UTC, Major Scott wrote:

Before first use, grip the bristles moderately firmly and pull. Repeat. This removes at least some loose ones.
If they use epoxy, they can't be using enough of it
NT
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look like any other paintbrush to me. I fully intend to clean them and reuse them!

Good idea.
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They look like any other paintbrush to me.  I fully intend to clean them and reuse them!

Promoted yourself I see.
The hairs soon start to come out and it's a bloody nuisance picking them off the wet paint.
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