Day / Night CCTV

Has any one tried DIY CCTV I would like to detect motion of anyone near my house in day and night. At night the street is not completly dark, but a basic web cam just shows a black image. I am also planning on uploading the motion detected images on to a web site (this part I have no problems with).
My main intrested in people experiance of camera selection and connectivity to a PC
lastly can i get a grant from the council for this??? as its could be said its their lack of policing which has caused this issue.
Thanks
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none wrote:

Yes I have.

You need a camera with light amplification or an infra red filter and an IR lighting system. I can't remember what mine where called, they are generic security camera's feeding a frame grabber card.

I use some home made scripts and the GNU Motion system

You are more likely to get a fine if you are pointing your camera's into the street, mine overlook only my property.
//J
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why would i get a fine for pointing the camera into the street, Its a public area

At
site
connectivity
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none wrote:

Yes public, as in not your property, I am no expert in the rules governing the use of CCTV camera's but I am fairly certain that you would not be allowed to monitor the street like that, ask your council or local police station.
//J
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So why are shops and business allowed to monitor the street outside their building. Or do the council and police turn a blind eye ?

public
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none wrote:

I believe the rules are different for businesses, as I said please ask your local police department. I am not telling you what to do I merely attempted to make you aware that I believe you could be getting yourself in trouble by filming the street.
Also, please consider to kick the habit of top posting :)
//J
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none wrote:

But they are only monitoring a specific area of the premisis ie could be the doorway or take for example the garage forcourt, so long as it does not overstep the buildings boundry its fine.
Oh and one other thing a sign saying CCTV in operation is needed.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Businesses usually get permission if they are truly monitoring public property but I think you will find that a proportion of the shop frontage is part of the shop property. The data protection act is also involved.
Ask somebody who will know, I.E. your local council and police authority. Unlikely to get into trouble but better safe than sorry.
--
Clint Sharp

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On Wed, 9 Aug 2006 10:12:08 +0100, none wrote:

It's not so much a fine, but you could be prosecuted under the Data Protection Act if you set up a CCTV camera system to monitor a public place without making an appropriate registration with the Information Commissioner.
Look here for more information, and in your case the "Small User Checklist" is a good summary of what you need to do.
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public
place
Checklist"
Thanks for the tips
I called them and domestic properties are excempt
just need a recommendations and any comments about which cameras to use, and if any one has any helpful tips about the s/w that could also been good
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On Wed, 9 Aug 2006 11:24:22 +0100, none wrote:

Not if you turn your cameras onto a public place. Did you tell them that you intend to monitor the street outside your home?
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wrote:

Doesn't it seem odd that I can take my "ordinary" digi camera anywhere in the street and photograph almost anything, yet I can't point a CCTV camera into the same street? :-)
--
Frank Erskine

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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. I remember Frank Erskine

It's to do with viewer safety. With a still digicam you choose to take the picture or not, thus providing a filter of sorts. Imagine the shock to innocent viewers seeing motion pictures of all the ugly people in the typical street.
--

Dave

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That can't be the reason ... They *choose* to watch them on reality TV shows instead!

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_Inside_ of domestic properties is exempt under S36 of the DPA. Outside your boundary is not. Moreover by using motion detection and uploading to a website you put yourself most definitely within the DPA requirements.
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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I'm replying to two post in one here ...

So where was 'here'? There was no link.

I've had a run-in with the local police about this; they were initially very reluctant to accept video from my system. Things began to turn around when there was a robbery, and it just so happened that I observed and reported it and my system had caught the perpetrators as they passed in front of my house - they were caught and convicted as a direct result. Nevertheless, they still seemed reluctant to use other CCTV footage, and when I offered it over the phone I often got conflicting viewpoints as to why.
In despair, I wrote to my local councillors, one of whom turned out to be an ex-copper. I asked him about the police's reluctance. He said that there was no problem with videoing evidence in your own premises or in a public place, but that video of what was occurring in other people's premises was unlikely to be accepted by courts in normal circumstances.
He also said that if the video was of the type where the date and time were subtitiled onto the footage, to be certain that the system clock was correct (don't forget the time changeovers in spring and autumn) otherwise, I imagine, a good defence lawyer would rubbish it out of court.
He also said to keep tape in good condition and make sure the heads are clean, so the result was more likely to be useful.
I also understand that you need to have a notice saying that your premises use CCTV.
As a result of his intervention, the police have now viewed all the evidence I had.

good
I use a Micromark CCTV built into a front door light, but I can't recommend it:
:-{ It was replaced twice under warranty :-{ Nevertheless, the photo-sensitive light control is broken so I have to remember to turn it on in the evening (not a problem) and off in the morning (a problem). :-{ Although the camera can be turned to face the approach to the door, the PIR which can be set to control the light and switch the TV over to the camera can not, so I have to keep the light on permanently at night - youths delivering papers discovered that they could approach the door without the light coming on, and word soon got around. :-{ The camera is not very sensitive to sodium street-lighting (the predominant yellow type) :-{ The greyscales produced are often surprisingly different from colour vision - a light colour can produce a dark grey and a black can produce a light grey. :-{ It can't be angled vertically. :-{ When the PIR fires, it will either switch your TV over to the camera or sound a very loud buzzer, or both, neither of which I want. :-{ It requires excavation of quite a large channel and quite a lot of ingenious patience to pull the DIN plug through the wall when installing it.
It does have a some good points though:
:-} The camera is discreet - it was there for quite a while without anyone apparently noticing it, and word only got around when the thieves were caught. :-} It can be angled horizontally, so when required I can turn it to film what is happening in the park. Again, even when they knew I had CCTV, it was quite a while before the trouble-makers realised this. :-} The video comes out of the control box through a standard SCART connector, so can be plugged into any standard recording device.
I record everything that happens 24hrs (no motion detection) outside my front door onto a HDD/DVD-R recorder hard disk. I use normal editing facilities to preserve anything I think merits it before it's overwritten, being sure to log the date and exact time in the title of the clip. If I particularly want to record TV with the HDD/DVD-R, I can also record the camera using a VCR. I can dub footage onto VHS or DVD-R as appropriate.

Notwithstanding my comments about sensitivity to street-lighting above, this could simply be a matter of TV/Monitor adjustment. Its surprising what a difference this can make - a scene initially appearing to contain nothing whatever of value can actually reveal quite a lot if the set is adjusted optimally and viewed in a darkened room. In particular, while I very much prefer a modern LCD flat-panel for normal TV viewing, with night-time CCTV its difficult to get a good combination of backlight, brightness and contrast levels, and I have found that I get best results from an old Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) TV, with the contrast around 3/4 of maximum, the brightness about 5/8 of maximum, and other picture controls at their mid-point. Before lashing out on IR stuff, try investigating this. I get useful results at night without IR stuff, though obviously I would welcome the improvement that IR would bring.
I'm inclined to think it particularly bad of CCTV makers not to make sure that their kit is sensitive to street lighting, though I guess given the limited ranges of frequencies involved there may be little or no overlap between those of the common sodium and mercury sources and the sensitivity of the CMOS/CCDs.
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Java Jive wrote:

Wow! have you ever thought joe public is paying council tax for policing the beat?
And here's you doing the job for them.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Exactly, never see them around anymore?...
--
Tony Sayer


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I have seen more patrols by police in the last six months than I previously had in the last six years ... but, more to the point, they will quite rightly follow the problem. What we have been largely successful in doing is moving the problem on.

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Well round here we see the police chopper more then any coppers!....
--
Tony Sayer


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