Concrete post problem

OK, got a problem with one of my fence posts.
As you can see from this pic, the concrete post is leaning to the left, producing a slight gap between the post and panel at the bottom and an even bigger one at the top.
http://tinyurl.com/mmmxj2n
(ignore the missing half panel on the left)
The post was like this when I moved in. The last occupants had gotten round the gap by attaching another piece of wood to the side of the panel to make it wider, but now Ive got new panels, really I would like the job done properly and the post aligning correctly. BUT it appears to be embedded in concrete (not sure if its quite visible in the pic), which is also covering the bases of the concrete gravel boards which the fence panels are sat on.
Digging this out is going to be a major pain, owing the the neighbour having stuff stored next to the fence which cannot be easily moved (Im sure you can see the weatherproof outdoor box next to the fence).
So, is it a case of digging down 2 feet and getting the old grinder with diamond cutting disc out to remove the excess concrete?
Thanks in advance, I look forward to your suggestions, but not the subsequent task of sorting this out :(
--
Best Wishes
Simon Taylor
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On 08/05/2015 11:27, Simon T wrote:

If you have a sufficiently substantial tree in the right direction, you could try applying tension with a wire rope / chain and a suitable turnbuckle. If you are lucky, the concrete ball might move enough over a few days to settle into a better position.
Digging out is likely to be a PITA, I would go for camouflage, e.g. another fence board over the gap positioned to disguise the misalignment.
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"newshound" wrote in message

So, you reckon just attaching a wooden batten to the side to make it fit better would be a better solution then?
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Simon Taylor
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On 08/05/2015 11:53, Simon T wrote:

Once a fence post has moved like that, there is little you can do. Over time pressure from the tree will only make things worse.
I doubt if a steel wire from the base of the next post to the top of the leaning post will coax the post straight.
The alternative to replacement is to simply disguise or hide the symptom.
Even after replacement, can you be confident it won't move again?
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On 08/05/2015 11:53, Simon T wrote:

Not so much a batten, if you are replacing the current fence with a close-boarded fence panel then I might fit another board to the concrete post, wide enough to overhang the panel, with a batten to close the gap.
It's easy to overcome your problem if you use loose feather-edge boards on triangular rails rather than "fence panels". Assuming the post at one end is vertical, you start from the good post and fit most of the boards vertical but adjust the angle of the last few to "smear" the gap. It won't show if you do it right, because that is exactly what I had to do to conceal a neighbour's angled post. Personally, I screw rather than nail feather edge fences because it is then easy to do fine adjustments for width.
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Simon T wrote:

I have several posts with this problem and also some with wider but parallel spacing (maybe from the days of imperial panels?) Strictly this is my neighbours fence but they are so laid back as to be near horizontal and incapable of anything practical. When the panels used to come out it was my plants that got damaged. I have cut pressure treated spacers, tapered as necessary to centralise the panels in each position and retreated with paint on tanalising paint. I've drilled pilot holes in the edges of the panel and screwed through into the spacers with stainless screws and the panels no long fall or spring out in the wind.
It does not even show too much as the spacer in mainly hidden in the rebate of the posts.
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grunted:

+1
I have a whole bloody garden-full of the damned things! And a lot worse than the OP's; and several are skew-iff in two directions, not just one.
Mostly down to massive tree roots I reckon :(
--
David

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Simon T expressed precisely :

No, I would try pulling it straight first, little by little. As above, a turn buckle lashed to something substantial, or lashed to several other posts. Even a car jack and timber against a wall, if there is one handy, or pushing against a temporary large peg in the ground at 45 deg..
As said, little by little. Apply a little bit of force, then as it loosens up, apply some more - every day or once a week, until back in position.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Hi Harry...nice to see you are still around...Jim
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Jim GM4DHJ at the Holiday Hacienda ... explained :

Ta!
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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hope that AH4 is stll working ....
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Jim GM4DHJ at the Holiday Hacienda ... formulated the question :

AH4 is working a treat :D
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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I'm definitely on the side of cutting a tapered filler rather than messing with the post. Life's too short to worry about minor details like that.
Mike
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"Muddymike" wrote in message

Okey dokey, I'll start filling the hole back in and head off to the timber department at Wickes then
:-)
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Simon Taylor
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On 08/05/2015 11:27, Simon T wrote:

If the post is steel reinforced, chisel away the post near the bottom, bend it straight and refill with fresh concrete. Maybe.
Cheers
--
Syd

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On 08/05/2015 11:27, Simon T wrote:

I think I would make up a suitable tapered fillet of wood that can be nailed to the edge of the fence panel, such that it is then properly held by the off vertical slot. Failing that, perhaps cut the post off at the base and fit another using a metpost spike in a different position and using different width panels.
--
Cheers,

John.
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