Combined cordless screwdriver and drill

I am interested in getting a small cordless screwdriver like the one in Lidl at the moment.
https://www.lidl.co.uk/en/MiddleofLidl.htm?articleId "850
Is it possible for this to take a small drill bit to make a pilot hole?
I haven't seen any combined cordless screwdrivers and drill. Are they too different to include in one tool?
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Pamela wrote:

you can get hex-shank drill bits, e.g.
<https://ebay.co.uk/itm/283446228155
but you might find a screwdriver is a bit slow for them, compared to a drill-driver
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The hex-shank bits I have had appeared to have been held in by an adhesive which made them fine for pilot holes in wood or plastic, a couple I used for a pilot hole in metal ended up with drill loose in the shank. Possibly heat generated in doing that ruined the bond.
GH
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Marland wrote:

yes, some use resin others are crimped ... they're all expendable.
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On 11/06/2019 05:25, Andy Burns wrote:

Apropos of actually answering the OP, I bought a dirt cheap wickes screwdriver and it drills OK for reasonably light use. Going into brick with a hammer option I use something more manly...
It takes standard drill bits just FINE
https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-10-8V-Li-ion-Cordless-Drill-Driver/p/141086
is what I have. Unlike the cheap orbital sander which has died *again* this product seems OK. # DO NOT BUY THIS POS # https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-1-3-Sheet-Sander-240V---220W/p/141164
Ive bought a makita to replace three days ago and although its more expensive its SO much better
https://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-bo3710-electric-sheet-sander-240v/6330j
The paper clamping is the best Ive ever seen, the motor is smooth and runs cool, and they even provide a punch to make the anti clogging dust extractor holes in the sandpaper.
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On Tuesday, 11 June 2019 09:09:44 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

that's a cordless drill, not a screwdriver.
NT
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Intresting to see it's called a "drill driver" although it looks like a drill.
Presumably "drill driver" means "drill and screwdriver" rather than "something which drives in drill bits"
How do those three fingers in the chuck hold a screwdriver bit correctly?
https://tinyurl.com/drill-and-driver
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On 12/06/2019 01:16, Pamela wrote:

Yup, drill driver normally means a drill, that can also drive screws.
It distinguishes it from a powered screwdriver, which is usually too feeble to do anything, a "combi" drill (which is a drill driver that also has a hammer action), or an impact driver, which is a very high powered screwdriver with a percussive angular mechanism to gain a big increase in torque and reduce the tendency for the bit to jump out of the screw under load.

That is just a normal "three jaw" chuck. The fingers will sit nicely on the three of the flats of the six on a hex shank.
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I thought the screwdriver bits were on a square shank. If it's hex then that fits much better.
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On 12/06/2019 13:30, Pamela wrote:

No, standard screw driving bits use a 1/4" hex shank, like:
https://www.screwfix.com/p/wiha-maxxtor-bit-box-pz2-x-29mm-5-pack/4334g
(you can get bits for driving *screws* with square drive heads - but the shank is still hex)
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Is it worth having torque settings on a very basic cordless screwdriver for only occassional use? At approx 5 Nm there not much torque to start and I wonder if it's any parctical use at all.
These are the two cordless screwdrivers I'm comparing:
BOSCH (Amazon.com product link shortened)
TECCPO (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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What is its intended use, Pamela?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 15/06/2019 15:23, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

To drill slightly undersize 60mm pilot holes in 12mm ply to make the screws go in easier.
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Light household use.
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On 15/06/2019 17:32, Pamela wrote:

I think the thrust of the question is what kind of fastenings are you hoping to drive. For example the small lightweight drivers like you linked to can be good for spinning machine screws in and out of domestic equipment for service and repair. Also small wood screws in hinges etc. However they might have difficulty with driving 2" screws into wall plugs for fixing shelves or TV brackets.
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Just been using my tiny Makita impact screwdriver today. It really is one of the best purchases I've ever made. With practice it's ok on small stuff as well as punching well above its weight. Both batteries still fine too.
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On Sat, 15 Jun 2019 12:40:15 +0100, Pamela wrote:

I've had an IXO for years. Not enough oomph for some jobs, but still very useful indeed. And I have some of the hex drill bits - gain very useful, even if only for pilot holes.
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Does the lack of a variable speed trigger cause difficulty? Or the lack of a slippping clutch to limit the amount of torque?
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On Sat, 15 Jun 2019 17:33:38 +0100, Pamela wrote:

I can't say it's bothered me. It's not fast to start with. The torque is adequate, but unlikely to damage anything.
It's paired with a small Bosch Power4All cordless, which gets the bigger jobs. That does have an adjustable clutch.
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On 10/06/19 21:31, Pamela wrote:

You can get drill bits with a 1/4" hexagon end (the same size as screwdriver bits). Or you can get a pin chuck with a hexagon end like this: <https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1-4-Shank-0-5-8mm-Hex-Keyless-Drill-Chuck-Screwdriver-Bit-Impact-Driver-Adaptor-/113438177146
For making a pilot hole these are probably ok, but I wouldn't try to use a cordless screwdriver for anything needing any degree of accuracy, and I most certainly wouldn't use it with a drill bit over about 3mm diameter.
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