Best option for kitchen floor and heating

We're getting a substantial extension to our kitchen which will result in an L shaped area of about 40 square metres in total. I've looked into a number of flooring options and had several quotes (to be honest this is unlikey to be a diy job for me) but they are all frighteningly high. A quote for Karndean supply and fit came in about 2,200. The cheapest possible tiles from Topps come in at about 350 but with adhesive, ply sheets, grout and fitting, comes to a total of about 2,000. We're also a bit worried about ceramic being cold, and thought underfloor heating could take care of that and eliminate the need for radiators but that would add over 1500 to the cost.
Do we have to resign ourselves to the fact that for a half decent job it's going to cost serious money, or are there alternatives we've overlooked?
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I have a concrete floor covered in sheet vinyl, which is warm and very easy to clean and didn't cost very much. Plates even bounce off it without breaking (sometimes!)
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On 19 Mar 2006 03:50:00 -0800 someone who may be snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote this:-

Floor - do you want a floor that any crockery or glass you drop will break upon? An alternative is a wooden floor with some sort of covering. It might not look as good, though opinions vary, but gives dropped items more chance of survival.
Heating - if you want underfloor heating make sure that it is insulated underneath. Wet underfloor heating should be controlled separately from radiators due to its different characteristics. A separate valve or pump and a lower temperature than radiators are needed. An alternative is plinth heaters, under kitchen units. These again are best controlled separately, though it is not so important with these in house sized heating.
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David Hansen, Edinburgh
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On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 13:22:54 +0000, David Hansen

That's erroneous. I've had kitchens with plastic, wood and slate floors. There is no difference between them (or it is marginal enough not to make no practical difference). The far greater effect is based on the item itself and the angle at which it's dropped.
The only floor covering that makes some difference is carpet, and it's even more revolting to have that in a kitchen than a bathroom.
Hard floors are not cold under foot as long as they are insulated underneath. They acquire room temperature. I quite happily wander about with bare feet on a slate floor all the year round without feeling at all uncomfortable.
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.andy


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Andy Hall wrote:

Cork tiles are very good crockery-wise.
I'm sure they'll be fashionable again soon.
Owain
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On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 16:36:37 +0000 someone who may be Andy Hall

My experience is different. Vinyl covered wood floors are far kinder, though things still smash on them.
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David Hansen, Edinburgh
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Leaving aside the UFH issues, the average costs of flooring range from around 20-30 a square meter for carpet or vinyl or plastic laminate, up through 50-60 a square for fitted wood laminate, and some ceramics, to over 100 a square for top class stone and really good solid wood.
The best value for money is a careful screed and paint...;-)
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We're getting a substantial extension to our kitchen which will result in an L shaped area of about 40 square metres in total. I've looked into a number of flooring options and had several quotes (to be honest this is unlikey to be a diy job for me) but they are all frighteningly high. A quote for Karndean supply and fit came in about 2,200. The cheapest possible tiles from Topps come in at about 350 but with adhesive, ply sheets, grout and fitting, comes to a total of about 2,000. We're also a bit worried about ceramic being cold, and thought underfloor heating could take care of that and eliminate the need for radiators but that would add over 1500 to the cost.
Do we have to resign ourselves to the fact that for a half decent job it's going to cost serious money, or are there alternatives we've overlooked?
2200 for Karndean fitted - they're having a laugh. It's really rather easy to fit yourself, especially with the "PS" adhesive. This makes it a PLEASURE to lay. Please search for my previous posts on the subject!
I originally had a quote for ISTR about 650 for supply and fit in a medium-sized bathroom. Did it all myself for just the materials - approx 1/3 of the cost. If it all went pearshaped I could have bought all replacement materials to have another go and still been quids in!
Regards, Simon.
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