Kitchen Floor

We Wish to tile or put laminate on an old wooden kitchen floor,would the tiles crack because of movement. If we use wood style laminate, would spillage spoil it. Any suggestions and Any advice appreciated. E
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For ceramic tiling, lay 10mm Plywood first. The ply needs fixed (screwed) to the original floor at quite close spacing to hold firm. Seal the surface with two coats of a water/pva glue mixture to get a good grip on the tiling adhesive.
Laminate flooring needs two coats of a good quality Polyurethane Varnish, or Yacht Varnish, to make it more water resistant in a kitchen environment, but nothing more special than that.
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BigWallop wrote:

Some doesn't need anything. See other post for details.
MBQ
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You ever tried varnishing laminate flooring then? There's no way it would stick to it.
--
Tim Mitchell

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Eh? I can't believe you would ever get varnish to stick to laminate flooring.
Laminate is fine in a kitchen *if* you use the correct stuff. Stay clear of the cheap stuff and make sure whatever is used is rated for kitchens and bathrooms.
We did our kitchen with the Tile effect click stuff from B&Q (about 30 quid a sqm I think - probably cheaper now) and the offcuts that I have outside are still fine. No sign of swelling at all and it has had all winter out in the weather. A flood from the washing machine hasn't harmed it either.
Darren
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surface
tiling
or
but
Our kitchen floor is laid in cheap click-lock laminate and it buffed and varnished with no problems at all. After five years of kids and dogs and soakings, it still looks great and cleans very, very easily. I think we spent the same amount of cost on a good Yacht Varnish as we did on the actual laminate.
Oh well. :-) Each to their own, I s'ppose.
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BigWallop wrote:

I did that when tiling onto chipboard. The pva gave a shiny smooth finish that the adhesive didnt make any attempt at all to stick to. Tiles literally lifted off with no pressure at all. I had to sand it off and just tile onto bare chip, crossing my fingers the water content didnt wreck it - it was fine.
I would think tiles would give a more durable and lower cost floor. Yes you can buy wood that lasts, but its not cheap.
If you tile, definitely post-treat the grout, it can greatly extend floor life and ease of cleaning.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk wrote:

With PVA, unless you really want to seal the surface, apply the (plaster, render, tile adhesive) on top as soon as you've PVA'd. The idea is that the PVA leaches into each surfave, creating a bond. Many people let it dry completely, then it's like trying to stick something onto a sheet of Formica.
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Chris Bacon wrote:

I guess I laernt that the annoying way :) Yep, had to chip the stuff off the tiles to reuse them as well.
NT
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wrote:

Interesting. I can't imagine much sticking to formica, but IME pva sticks to pva, wet or dry. On a well sealed the surface the initial bond appears not too good, but the final bond is better if that makes sense.
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would
I've never known tile adhesive not stick like shit to a blanket when the surface is sealed. I mean, it sticks to other tiles, and you can't get more sealed than that. I'd guess maybe you didn't use enough adhesive.
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Stuart Noble wrote:

An unlikely guess I think. They were squished into a full layer of adhesive, not dotted. It was a white powder all in one job, basically white cement I suspect. And yes, before you ask, I did mix it with water.
I changed over to ready mixed tub stuff that worked properly and just used the white as grout.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk wrote:

Tiling over surfaces which can change with moisture and temperature is normally best achieved by using a latex additive to the adhesive.. I know you can purchase this from most tile centres and even B&Q.. This allows a little movement to the adhesive and will allow this to expand and contact as the base surface does... Tends to be especially important in kitchen and bathroom installations. If the surface is very uneven as in old floorboards then cover first with three millimetre ply or hardboard.. This also helps future changes as if you wish to remove the tiles and go back to boards you can cleanly pull up the covering boards..D
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Leveled wrote:

We've had "cheap & cheerfull" non water-resistant laminate in the kitchen for about 4 years or more now. It's had it's fair share of fluid spillages, what with 2 dogs who's food & water bowls are on it (one dog is the messiest of drinkers!)
ALso a Now 3 yr old who found the dogs water most fascinating!
Worst damage through water is a slight (fraction of a mm.) raising on the joins where water has been in contact for more than 10 minutes or so.
Mop up spills when they happen and it will be fine. DOn't think it would survive a washing machine flood though.
Laminate used was that quick lay "clip together" stuff.
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GymRatZ wrote:

Ours has :-) The U bend in the d/w and w/m drain gradually became blocked causing water to spill over the top of the standpipes every time one of the machines pumped out. Eventually the blockage was severe enough that enough water was dumped on the floor to be visible around the edges of the appliances. So, it survived regular wetting and drying out naturally for a number of weeks.
Ths is the tile effect stuff from B&Q.
What didn't survive was the worktop above which has partially delaminated along the front edge due, presumably, to the humidity and quality of said worktop.
MBQ
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Leveled wrote:

Most likely if wooden floor has movement. If we use wood style laminate, would

Mine hasn't in 6 years. The only damage is where sharp things have fallen on the floor point first. Get the laminate rated for the location e.g. the more expensive FloorMaster.
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If you're tiling then I'd add to the "cover with plywood" response by suggesting you also add some of that plasticiser stuff to the tile cement - sorry, the name of it escapes me. I've tiled a kitchen and dining room floors with it over 12 years ago and it's still fine, and I didn't use particularly heavy ply, maybe 1/2 inch.
If you're using wood-style laminate, then what I've done in the past is use silicon to glue the strips together rather than glue. It's worked so far.
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go for the click stuff made for the job. This fits so tightly together that glue let alone silicon would stop it clicking together properly.
Floormaster Tileloc was the stuff we used - it's been excellent so far.
Darren
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