alternative in-car stereo / mp3 / comments please .. - slightly o/t

HI All
Firstly - apologies for the fact that the last 10 years' developments in personal music technology seem to have passed me by... but I've been busy at other things <g>
Like many others of my generation, (I suspect ) - I have a couple of boxes of vinyl lps and singles, and cassette tapes in the shed.... despite being 'much loved' - they never seem to get played...
Sort of at the back of my mind for some time has been a plan to dig out these 'classics' and transfer them to something more modern - like CDs for instance.
Then I got to thinking (always fatal !) The new (old) car, a '64 Moggie Traveller needs some sort of music system, if only to drown out the rattles and bangs.
So - is there 'another way' to get the vinyl transferred into a format that could be used in the car ?
Possible plans so far 1) Grab the audio through my (pretty good) computer soundcard and burn to CDs
-- drawback - it's a tedious process, and ties up the PC for hours on end
2) Buy a dedicated CR-recorder and grab the audio and burn directly to CD. Thinking of the Sony RCDW100 Twin CDR - about 200.
-- drawback - cost - advantage - stand-alone solution
3) Grab audio to mp3 format, and diy an electronics solution to play mp3's in the 'new' car. Thinking of an mp3 player with line in and removable memory cards, combined with a simple homebrewed power amp / psu tucked away in the car somewhere. (There's the DIY angle !!)
-- drawback ... don't know ?? - price of the MP3 player perhaps ? --advantages - playback is 'bump-proof' - combination of Irish roads and 1960's Moggie suspension might cause problems for a conventional in-car CD player..
Any comments / suggestions etc ??
Many thanks Adrian
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<http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo 232&C=newsletter&UP06-2_N62CK&T856821
or just illegally copy the tracks you want off the internet.
Adam
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<http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo 232&C=newsletter&UP06-2_N62CK&T856821
Is it illegal if he downloads tracks he already has on vinyl? -- My blog: http://uk.360.yahoo.com/shiptodruid
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Dwayne & Angela wrote:

Yes, in this country anyway. We have no provision for format shifting or taking backup copies etc.
(not like anyone cares, and that was to my first suggestion! ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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HI All
On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 23:58:14 +0100, John Rumm

Call me old-fashioned - but I tend to prefer listening to what we used to call 'an album' rather than individual tracks....
Having said that - my few attempts to find 'free mp3 music' on the web have met with failure - it seems that most of the so-called free' sites have a sting in the tail - and require you to sign up for a subscription of some sort. If anybody knows of genuinely 'free' mp3 then I'd be delighted to hear (adrian at ambquality.co.uk works fine as an email address)
Thanks Adrian
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You can download albums as well.

All of MP3 is not free, but very cheap. Though there are issues with paying for it now AIUI VISA blocks payment to them (Short version of the backstory - Allof MP3 is based in Russia, they claim to be operating under Russian law, which means they don't pay royalties etc., hence why they are cheap. Hence, the RIAA, IFPI etc. are waging a campaign against them)
For free you need to look at the P2P (Peer to Peer) arena such as the Bittorrent or Gnutella
--
Chris French


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HI Chris
On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 08:29:26 +0100, chris French

Many thanks... Currently trawling through Gnutella with BearShare as a client - very interesting......
OK - so I've found some music - quite a lot of which is already on vinyl in the box in the shed (so I don't feel _too_ illegal !)
Now to look into actually playing it....
Many thanks Adrian
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Adrian wrote:

You can frequently find complete albums for download, or even collections of albums. Finding older albums is not always easy unless they were popular, but when they are there is is often quicker than digitising yours.

The obvious two to try are http://thepiratebay.org and http://www.torrentspy.com /
--
Cheers,

John.

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Alternatively, and more legally, why not borrow the CDs from your local record library and rip them from there? Assuming that one's music is available on CD, that is.
--
"If only I had known, I should have become a watchmaker." ~ Albert Einstein
[email me at huge huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
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Hi Huge

Indeed.... Haven't looked for CDs in our local library - might take a look next time I'm in there...
Thanks Adrian
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Adrian wrote:

not sure ripping cds is any "more" legal ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 19:24:54 +0100, John Rumm

Perhaps "more legal" was meant to be "less traceable"?
--
Regards,
Stuart.
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HI John
On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 11:19:33 +0100, John Rumm

Ah - so you can..... how interesting <g>

Might be obvious to you <g>......
I'll go take a look - thanks
Adrian
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HI Adam
On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 17:47:28 GMT, "ARWadsworth"

Well - I already have a fairly decent turntable (back from the days when hi-fi was a collection of separate boxes !) - so that's not a problem.
One thing in the Maplin write-up did look interesting - and that was the suggestion that you could grab the lp's at 45rpm rather than 33.3 - and then use the software (Audacity) to convert them to the correct speed.
Why didn't I think of that ?? I have Audacity and Goldwave - both of which will do this 'speed convert' thing - I'm thinking that there must be a catch though ????
Would cut the 'transcription' time by a third....

Well - I would if I could (find the free content, that is) All I ever seem to find is places that look free and then try to sting you for a subscription - I'm obviously looking in all the wrong places !
Thanks Adrian
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Then what are you beloved old albums doing in the shed, then ?! I got started with transferring some of my albums to CD and in the end found more pleasure in getting a new drive belt, arm and cartridge and rediscovering vinyl...

The catch is that vinyl is not recorded "flat", but has emphasis applied to diminish low frequencies and boost high frequencies. On playback, low frequencies are boosted and high frequencies cut. This reduces surface noise which is usually hissy, and avoids massive needle excursions on powerful bass signals. I suppose it's possible that your PC software could attempt some reverse correction, but assuming you were going to run your deck output through at least a pre- amp, you will probably lose some very high frequencies forever (running the LP fast will push all the frequences up, some beyond what the cartridge can faithfully reproduce), and it'd all be a bit of bodge for a small time-saving, frankly.

I think my kids might get some of their music from Russia (not on my home network, mind), but I have no doubt it's dubious in some respect. I have a quaint old-fashioned notion that if I want something, I should pay for it. Sad in the 21st century, I know. I am quite happy to buy CDs at under a tenner on average (sometimes much mess) and get 100% of the engineered and mixed product. They were nearer 15 in the early days, often for 35 minutes of simply transcribed analogue. Now, you will get a proper remaster, often done by some of the original team, and some bonus tracks, plus some sleeve notes telling you all about how the creative geniuses worked, how they weren't seeing enough groupie action, etc. (I do occasionally buy "new" music...)
Anyway, to return to your in-car needs, you will find that some kind of "line" input is increasingly common on car head units these days. I would doubt if any of them would stylistically match your car interior, however. But even if you have to purchase a simple radio unit, something like an iTrip works surprisingly well.
HTH.
-- "Going out of my mind, back in 5 minutes."
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John Laird wrote:

Aha, back in the days when RIAA was just an equalisation curve and not a dirty word for organised megalomania hell bent of suing grannies. ;-)
Some audio packages can implement RIAA equalisation in software, although I think you still get best results using a preamp with a proper phono stage.
(maplin used to do a mono preamp module with RIAA equalisation, I used a pair of them to build a little compensation box to stick between a record deck and a sound card. That seemed to do the trick nicely)

Yup, I have no problem with that. It starts getting a bit much when they want you to buy it over and over on every format you may want to use it in tough. Especially since all you are paying for is a license - the media cost representing the square root of naff all.
--
Cheers,

John.

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I suppose it gets a bit tricky, proving you own one version and want another. I do object to the notion of levies on media such as cassettes (I presume that's a dead issue now, although I wouldn't be surprised if there are moves to put levies on solid state players). I wouldn't buy downloads at what amounts to very nearly the same price as a CD, only without 90% of the data, never mind the actual CD and box and insert. And the logic of only buying part of an album also escapes me. There's always Now That's What I Call A Load Of Old Bollocks Vol 257 for that.
Sadly, I think the cutting edge has left me behind. But there are compensations - I no longer feel the need to listen to Radio 1, Radio 2 can be found to be playing the full 9 minute version of Won't Get Fooled Again in the middle of the morning, and almost every music show on the Beeb telly channels seems to be aimed at my generation. So that's alright, then.
-- "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss."
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Adrian wrote:

Couple of options you could consider...
1) Many modern car stereos have either a 3.5mm stereo line in connector already, for input from mp3 players - so no need for a home-brew amp.
2) Alternatively some car stereos have USB connectors so an mp3 player can be plugged in directly (digital so no messing around with volume settings).
3) Many CD players advertise themselves as being mps compatible. This means thay can read mp3 files from a data CD rather than audio tracks from an audio CD. Net result is being able to fit *much* more music on a CD (albeit at a theoretically lower quality - though I doubt you'll notice in a car)
4) Look at devices like take any audio source and transmit a very low power FM signal that can be picked up, a short range, by a car radio. (Go to amazon.co.uk and search for "Digiana Audia")
VH.
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Hi
wrote:

Didn't know that .... (shows how far 'behind the times' I am !)

Something else I didn't know !

That makes 3

OK - not sure that's going to be useful for me - but thanks for all the pointers. Spent a happy half-hour browsing the 'in car entertainment' section of the CPC catalogue last night <g>
So, you could store large amounts of mp3 on a digital memory 'stick' and just plug it into the car radio..... clever !
Do 'personal' mp3 players with the same ability exist? - might take some of the boredom out of mowing the grass, and would allow the same mp3 'sticks' to be used elsewhere around the house...
Many thanks Adrian
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Adrian wrote:

There are a lot of USB memory sticks that include MP3 players, and they're quite cheap if you don't want displays etc. Argos have 2Gb ones from 40
You would need to check individual specs to see if they allow replay through the USB port if you want to plug it into a car (or house) system using USB. These systems are becoming more common. You can also use them to carry .doc files etc around with you.
Owain
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