A very quick furniture project

I have not had much chance to get out into the workshop much lately, but did get a couple of days over the Christmas break.
So another shelving and storage project for those that like that sort of thing:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Bedroom_study_unit
(usual wiki rules apply - so probably full of typos!)
--
Cheers,

John.
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John Rumm wrote:

Get a mouse mat, the legs will wear down to nothing on that mouse.
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Excellent!
After reading the discussion on laying flat tower units, I might have been tempted to bring the desk top forward at the seating position (power bulge:-) and stuck the display on top of the m/c.
--
Tim Lamb

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On 04/01/2016 20:26, Tim Lamb wrote:

Yup could do. although it would probably not have all come out of one sheet that way. Also the depth to the wardrobe behind the seating position is not that large, so did not want to lose too much space.
(The PC will go back a bit - its currently got an HDMI cable plugged into a DVI to HDMI adaptor, which is pushing it out over 3" from the wall...)
--
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John.
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On 04/01/2016 18:17, John Rumm wrote:

Couple of days! It takes me a year to make something like that :-)
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newshound wrote:

A year? I'd be dead before I got there. I find John's projects rather depressing in that sense - the more so as I think my excuse that I only had one year of woodwork at school before Latin took its place may be beginning to wear a bit thin :(
--
Robin
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On 04/01/2016 21:34, Robin wrote:

Yeah me too! My shower room/toilet project is in to its third month. flippin electrics + ceiling took a month and every time I progress I have more problems. Without you guys helping me it would be even longer. Age does take its toll but hey I do enjoy DIY.
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On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 21:34:25 -0000, Robin wrote:

Ah but bear in mind the base drawer units are Ikea and do you have all the big toys, a saw that can rip down a 4 x 2 on the 4" side, a thicknesser, finger jointer (ok home brew but). Then have 8" x 2" bits of cherry lying about...
I suspect John has toys that when he sets the thicknesser to 1/4" that is what it does, this time, next time, a years time. Same with the table saw. Even basic toys speed up making things no end and that's with having to spend 10 minutes setting the thing up as repeatabilty is +/- 1 mm.
It's quite a construction I hope John's daughter appreciates it. My first thought was that that PC is taking up too much knee space but with bought units and limit on width the knee space is what it is.
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Cheers
Dave.
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On 05/01/2016 08:52, Dave Liquorice wrote:

I have found doing the drawing or model first makes the whole thing much quicker. You can prepare most of the materials without needing to sit down and work out sizes and how its going to fit together on the fly.

Indeed, and all fair points... partly why I describe how I do some of the tasks. For this particular job, a hand held circular saw and a sawboard would do most of the jobs (in fact I used one for the first cuts on the full sheet of MDF since its too large to get through my table saw in the space I have).
My table saw won't rip 4" anyway - I need to do two cuts, one from each side.
I did finger joints since once you have made the jig; which can be nothing more than a batten screwed to your mitre fence:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/File:SettingDentilCutSpacing.jpg
they are quick and easy. For small drawers a butt joint would have been fine - most of the strength comes from the base of the drawer keeping it all square.
> Then have 8" x 2" > bits of cherry lying about...
Having found a (local ish) source of hardwoods, I normally make a point of buying a little bit more than I need for a specific job just so that I have some spare for times like this. On the odd occasion I have even just bought something on spec since I know it will come in handy... e.g. I bought a 6x2" plank of walnut just so that I would have a dark wood available for trimming and highlights etc. Came in quite handy for the chess board:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Chess_Board
(even though one day I may rebuild that since I was not that happy with the overall aesthetic!)

Yup kind of. Unless you are very close to your final size, you need to step down to it in multiple passes. So typically you will feed each board several times.
Also its often a very easy way of planing up both sides of something if you are not too fussed about absolute squareness or flatness (thicknesers will make one surface perfectly parallel to the opposing one - but they can't always remove twist and other deformations in a board).
In this case I did not need any specific size other than "thinish", so it was really just a case of turning the wood into something that did not look like the side of a CLS 4x2"!

Yup a table saw of some description is a major step forward in accuracy and getting a wide range of jobs done. Its the single most productive tool in the workshop. With a few home made jigs you can do all kinds of stuff on it

She seems quite pleased ;-) It was even enough incentive to get her to finish decorating that wall its against (the room decoration was started piecemeal - and then she lost interest half way through, so that wall sat there with a strip of wallpaper torn off for the best part of a year).

I figured it was going to be a slight problem with the size of the PC, and a small form factor machine would have been better.
However such is the nature of when you assemble one from bits you have laying about - you don't always get the perfect choice. I had a Core Quad Q9950 CPU and mobo, with reasonably decent GFX card spare after updating my games platform last year, so selected a nice small neat case from one of a clients scrapped machines. Its only when I went to assemble it, I realised it was a full ATX motherboard and not a micro one - and I had a couple of inches more board than would fit in the case! So it turned out bigger than planed.
--
Cheers,

John.
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On Tue, 05 Jan 2016 12:45:20 +0000, John Rumm

What saw do you have?
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On 14/01/2016 16:37, Stephen wrote:

Its an ancient Delta[1] Unisaw (made in 1948 I am told), with a 10" blade. Right tilting. A very solid machine with good cast iron top with the small extension side tables. It still has the original style fence and guide rails system (with pipes that run front and back), rather than the more modern style Biesemeyer fence.
[1] Its the international version, so its branded Tauco - the company Herb Tautz formed when he sold up to Rockwell Delta, but retained the rights to distribute their kit outside the US.
--
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John.
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