Why is raw honey from Costco twice as expensive as Filtered ?

On 01/01/2016 06:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Don't be so quick to laugh:
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/5684/20140117/5-000-bees-fitted-microchip-sensors-map-movement-stop-disease.htm
Any bee with the wrong chip, or no chip, will be droned forthwith.
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replying to Paintedcow, King Arthur ll wrote: I think filtering honey leaves the beekeeper with some residues (pollen?) that they sell separately and make money from.
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On 6/28/2017 6:44 AM, King Arthur ll wrote:

Well , since I am a beekeeper ... I guess , since we're up to 7 hives now . If you look closely at the "ingredients" list of that processed honey product you'll probably find it's been cut with corn syrup - and it's damn sure been heated to thin it out for filtering . The honey from my hives is "raw unfiltered honey from untreated bees" , and the only thing in there is what the bees bring in . And (diety of choice) help you if you buy "honey" from China , there could be *anything* in there . Filtering does leave residues , but AFAIK they just get tossed .You might be thinking of propolis , a sticky substance bees make to seal up cracks and fill crevices to keep small hive beetles from hiding in them . Propolis has antibacterial and other medicinal properties , and is harvested and sold by some beekeepers . I let the bees keep it ... but I do take honey , being sure to leave them enough to feed themselves over the cold/dearth months when they can't forage for nectar . Oh , and some beekeepers also harvest pollen from their hives , but I don't . The pollen in my honey is enough to help with allergies - and fall pollen is different from spring pollen .
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Just curious. I'm a city boy so know nothing about this. How do you know how much honey to leave them for the winter? Trial and error?
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On 6/28/2017 2:39 PM, CRNG wrote:

It depends on the size of the colony , but there are general guidelines . With 2 deep and one medium box on , I like to have my hives weighing around 90-110 lbs in late November . They don't eat so much when it's cold - under 40° - but it takes a LOT of resources to "brood up" in the spring . Population contracts in late summer/into fall , then around late February (here , other places timing might be different) they start to build up again for the spring nectar "flow" . Peak population in my hives is probably around 35,000 to 45,000 bees . Takes a lot of bees to bring in all that nectar and pollen !
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28 Jun 2017 20:21:29 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:
<snip> > It depends on the size of the colony , but there are general

Terry,
I'm wondering something about bees. I'm going to take a 2x4 and use a hole cutter to cut holes the size of a mason jar lid. I intend to place the mason jars inside these holes, upside down of course in an effort to see if honey bees will take interest and build a cone. Is this feasable, or, am I essentially wasting my time? If I am wasting my time, do you have any suggestions for how I might accomplish the goal?
Like CRNG, I'm a city boy and know little about nature or things related to it. Thanks ahead of time for any suggestions/advice you're willing to offer.
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On 6/29/2017 11:00 PM, Diesel wrote:

A mason jar is way too small for bees to make a colony , they like a bit larger space . Bees don't usually make cones , those are wasps , and most people don't want them around . Now if you hung a box about 15 x 20 x 20 up in a tree and baited it with a q-tip dipped in lemon grass oil inside a baggie , a feral or swarm colony might take interest . Leave a 3/4" hole for an entrance somewhere near the bottom .
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30 Jun 2017 12:11:22 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

Thanks Terry!
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On 6/28/2017 8:00 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Having worked once in a lab where sugars were starting materials, I like to tell people that the sugars in honey, glucose and fructose, are the same as those in invert or hydrolyzed sucrose. High fructose corn syrup has the same sugars. Corn sugar is all glucose but today they have enzymes that can convert half to fructose.
Critics complain that high fructose corn syrup is bad for you but are silent about the sugar in fruit which is fructose and none of these eco-nuts will want to tell you that fruit is bad for you.
Honey as you point out has other flavors and substances in it and unfiltered may simply be a product in low production making cost slightly higher.
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On 6/28/2017 2:58 PM, Frank wrote:

You'd have a hard time finding anything but unfiltered raw honey around here . Processed honey is a city thing ... well , actually a consumer-driven thing . People want their honey crystal clear , and unfiltered honey is often slightly cloudy . I prefer mine straight from the comb , just strained thru some cheesecloth to get most of the wax and bee parts out .
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On 6/28/2017 4:04 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

I love the unfiltered honey right from the comb!
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Wed, 28 Jun 2017 21:04:58 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:
<snip> > I love the unfiltered honey right from the comb!
We have something in common then. :) I also greatly enjoy real molasses. From Maple trees. A friend gave me a mason jar full of Tennessee molasses, but, it didn't come from a Maple tree. They swear I won't notice any difference (I haven't tried any of it yet), but, I suspect I will; considering how much and how often I gorged myself on it growing up. I actually tapped Maple trees when I was a teenager to obtain what would become Molasses from the trees, but, I'm completely lost as to how they make Molasses here without the tree. Culture shock you might say is an under statement in this case. I've been down here for a long time now, but, I still don't understand some things about the south.
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On 6/29/2017 11:00 PM, Diesel wrote:

I think you might have maple syrup confused with molasses . Maple syrup is made by boiling the excess water out of the sap of the maple tree , molasses is made from the sorghum plant . Two entirely different things ...
What part of the south do you live in ?
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wrote:

Actually MOST molasses isa byproduct of cane sugar production.d
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Hmm. It's possible. It's been a long time since I've done that. I'm in TN...
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On 6/30/2017 6:39 PM, Diesel wrote:

Reading this, where does Jack Daniels get it's wood?
Jack Daniel's is not a bourbon - it's a Tennessee Whiskey. Jack Daniel's is dripped slowly - drop-by-drop - through ten feet of firmly packed charcoal (made from hard sugar maple) before going into new charred oak barrels for maturing.
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On 6/30/2017 6:14 PM, Frank wrote:

I don't know ... I drink Evan Williams Kentucky Straight Sour Mash Bourbon Whiskey . Straight . Smewwwwth ...
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On 6/30/2017 7:27 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

It's aged in oak barrels but maybe not made from over 51% corn. They claim the sugar maple charcoal filtration but apparently sugar maple trees come from New England. From Wiki:
The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5) state that bourbon made for U.S. consumption[18] must be:
Produced in the United States[19] Made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn[20] Aged in new, charred oak containers[20] Distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by         volume)[20] Entered into the barrel for aging at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume)[20] Bottled (like other whiskeys) at 80 proof or more (40% alcohol by volume)[21]
I don't drink much hard stuff and prefer Scotch whiskey made from barley.
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On 6/30/2017 12:00 AM, Diesel wrote:

I never herd of maple syrup referred to as molasses. One is made from the sap of the maple tree, the other comes from sugar cane. Different thing with different flavores.
I even looked it up to see if the terms were interchangeable. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molasses
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On 6/30/2017 9:23 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Maple syrup contains sucrose same as molasses as far as actual sweetener goes. Invert sucrose, a mixture of glucose and fructose essentially the same sugars as honey. All these things are related but the goodies in them account for the different taste.
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