Thickness of Sheet Rock In Garage in Houston as Result of Harvey

One sheet rock contractor replacing the sheet rock in a Houston garage that was flooded by Harvey says there are two sizes, one thicker than the other. Another sheet rock contractor working inside the house says just use the standard size. Is there a thicker size that should be used in a garage?
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Arnie Goetchius wrote:

After Googling the subject, looks like we should be using Type X which is 5/8 inch compared to the standard which is 1/2 inch. It is also more fire resistant
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says...

There is no zoning in Houston, so you can indeed have an odd mixture of commercial buildings in close proximity to residential areas and vice versa. There have been several initiatives to implement zoning, but every time a referendum has been held, the pro-zoning forces have failed to muster enough votes to make it happen.
There are local building codes, but building codes are not the same thing as zoning.
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wrote:

No zoning? Really? Sounds like Tijuana.
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Dave Garrett wrote:

Exactly. The building/electrical/plumbing inspectors have been all over the place making sure that all repairs meet the current building codes.
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On 9/13/2017 5:24 PM, Arnie Goetchius wrote:

Typically you use what code calls for The 2006 edition of the IRC states the following concerning garage walls and ceilings:
R309.2 Separation Required The garage shall be separated from the residence and its attic area by not less than 1/2-inch (12.7 mm) gypsum board applied to the garage side. Garages beneath habitable rooms shall be separated from all habitable rooms above by not less than 5/8-inch (15.9 mm) Type X gypsum board or equivalent. Where the separation is a floor-ceiling assembly, the structure supporting the separation shall also be protected by not less than 1/2-inch (12.7 mm) gypsum board or equivalent. Garages located less than 3 feet (914 mm) from a dwelling unit on the same lot shall be protected with not less than 1/2–inch (12.7 mm) gypsum board applied to the interior side of exterior walls that are within this area. Openings in these walls shall be regulated by Section 309.1. This provision does not apply to garage walls that are perpendicular to the adjacent dwelling unit wall.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Thanks for the reference. When in doubt, we will use Type X
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On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 17:24:33 -0400, Arnie Goetchius

3/8". 1/2", and 5/8" 5/8" for fire rating between house and garage - required by some codes.
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On Thu 14 Sep 2017 12:40:59p, Oren told us...

I guess it depends on where you live. The last house we had built in Ohio had two layers, both 5/8" thich. The layer next to the studs was a fire brake material. The outer was ordinary drywall.
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On Thu, 14 Sep 2017 20:10:14 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

Nice.
Our dogs have all adopted the main foyer of the house as their cool napping area. I am embarrassed to admit, occasionally our donkey even sneaks in and joins them on really hot days (she is pretty darn cute). The floor is thick quarry tile but the walls are painted dry wall. As a result the walls get dirty quickly and it is a large entry way.
I have recently been giving some thought to removing the bottom 4 feet of dry wall (ten foot ceilings) and replacing it with concrete backer board and tile. The house keeper agrees it would be much easier to clean the barnyard grime from dogs coats off the tile than it is to clean it from the paint, she could even wet mop the wall tile.
I am not really fond of drywall, but, it is better than plaster and there doesn't really seem to be a better option for a house.
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On Thu 14 Sep 2017 01:26:40p, Stormin' Norman told us...

I would love to see that donkey. They really are cute, and can make very loving pets.

There are many options in tile. A ery practical and attractive alternative to paint. In our last house in Ohio we had the foyer walls papered floor to ceiling. It was a paper that had been lamiinated with a matte vinyl surface that made it very easy to clean and totally washable.

Drywall is pretty much the standard wall surface everwhere I have lived, although our co-op has walls made of some type of concrete board. It's hard enough that it must be drilled in order to hang anything on it. For most pictures I drill a very small pilot hole and then tap in a picture hanger or nail.
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