Someone help me please! A/C questions

Yesterday, the actual temperature got to 110 degrees F. and my 6year old a/c decided to go on the blink.
First, I changed the filters, they were a little past due. Then, I checked the thermostat, and found that the batteries were corroded, but still was working. Cleaned up that mess and installed fresh batteries. Then I reset the breaker. None of this worked. First sign of daylight, I took the compressor apart and found filthy with Willow seeds. Cleaned all that up, but still the compressor doesn't work.
It's a Lennox, if that matters. Any suggestions?
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On Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 12:34:53 PM UTC-4, Catalina wrote:

Depends on your skill level. If you're not familiar with working on AC voltage circuits, call a pro. If you have basic skills, first questions are is there 240V at the contactor, which is the relay in the outside unit that closes to power the compressor? When the thermostat calls for cooling, does the blower run? Is there 24V at the low voltage side of the contactor? Does the contactor, hum, close and you get 240V on the output side? Fan there run? Compressor hum or does nothing? If it has 240V and it hums, might be a bad start capacitor, they frequently fail.
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On 7/21/2018 12:35 PM, Catalina wrote:

I had a signal wire from the thermostat break near the compressor apparently due to vibrations over the years. I have a service contract and tech found it when opening unit.
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I'm guessing it's in the wiring, I just hope the service technician gets here before I pass out.
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On 7/21/2018 2:13 PM, Catalina wrote:

Are you certain it's getting power? I know you reset the breaker at the panel. I have a breaker at the 200-Amp service panel and also a disconnect breaker on the side of the house adjacent to the compressor. Both have to be passing current for the system to work. Some of the outside boxed (depending on your electrician, etc) will have a breaker, others may have a cartridge fuse.
Last but not least, let's not forget that circuit breakers can crap out after time. Gotta make sure you have current on both phases of the 240v at the compressor.
Only time I had a problem in recent memory was when some damn chipmunks got into the compressor housing and decided that the insulation on the control wiring was delicious and the small gauge copper wire was just dandy to gnaw through.
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Catalina wrote:

My guess is it's a capacitor. Would only cost you $30 or less to swap them out; $250 or so if a pro/tech does it. You have to learn how to discharge a possibly charged capacitor before you do it. Good luck!
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On 7/21/2018 4:00 PM, Bill wrote:

Well Genius... Where does a citizen purchase the needed capacitor without an account? They are not available just anywhere other then Wholesale Dealers. Most Service companies purchase them by the case and it takes a number of cases to cover all values that are made. Service call is about $120...Capacitor is about $45 and is usually a dual for fan also...Labor about $20...Plus whatever tax you area requires.
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Leper wrote:

I didn't have any trouble locating the ones I needed in Indianapolis, and I didn't even have to go to Granger (who I suppose has them all at twice the price). Just check the Yellow Pages.
They are not available just anywhere other then

I had "half" of a dual go out, and replaced the half I needed for cheap. The replacements don't have to be "Lennox" branded, they just need to be the right size (or a little bigger). Like I suggested, the OP could swap out the capacitors and be out less than half the price of a service call. It doesn't take a "genius". I bought a voltage tester that tests capacitors too for about $60.
There are some on Usenet who would discourage DIY's. I am just the opposite. In my area, it cost $250 to have a capacitor replaced. Not all contractors are as reasonable as the ones in this forum.
Labor about $20...Plus whatever tax

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wrote:

Thanks, Bill. I've called the company I bought it from.
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On Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 6:17:12 PM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

t,

If you're smart and know the right things, you can save a lot sometimes. I have a Rheem AC that uses one of those fancy ECM fan motors in the outside condenser unit. It saves a little in energy usage, but the downside is unli ke a regular motor, it has lots of electronics in it. It failed after just a few years and little is here in NJ. New ones online were $350 plus.
I said screw that, figured out the motor rating and replaced it with a basi c split-phase one for $90. Bought it online, Amazon I think and had it in just a couple days. It would never run enough for the small energy differe nce to make up for the difference. And if you had a service call that could easily be a $500 or $800 bill. If they put another ECM in, it's no more re liable than the first one,which they most likely would do.
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You can buy capacitors on ebay from US places so shipping is only a few days for $ 20 or less for most.
Several years ago my AC quit. Called the man and he replaced the capacitor in about 10 minuits or so. He worked for a larger company . When I called they said the service call would be about $ 90 . Fair enough. Then that $ 20 capacitor cost me close to $ 300 for him to install it. That company had about 5 level of service and each one had a price. Mine was the least expensive. I would not have minded him charging $ 50 for the capacitor. In fact he asked me what I though it would cost and I told him probably about $ 25 to him, but $ 50 to me.
He was very friendly and knew a lot and he told me to get a capacitor and a relay as those 2 items usually go out. I looked on ebay and ordered one of each for less than $ 20 each. A few years later the AC quit again. I replaced the capacitor and all was well. Ordered another off ebay for a spare.
I would think most any shop that sells and rebuilds motors would sell you a capacitor for less than $ 50. My well pump quit and it was the start points . Took them to a motor shop and the name tag data of the motor. The man came back with a new one and sold it to me without any problem.
Mos likely if a CC Dickson suply place is near you , you can get one there without an account. I bought a few bearings for my AC air handler unit from them without an account.
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On Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 5:33:29 PM UTC-4, Leper wrote:

  Then I

, I took the

ll that

ontract

to

k!

That is incorrect. Those motor caps are a common item, same one used in man y units and they are typically easily available online from many sources in cluding Ebay and Amazon. You just need to identify the correct form factor, capacitance and max voltage. Plenty of stories here of people putting in one themselves for $25 and others paying hundreds of dollars to an HVAC guy .
Most Service companies purchase them by the case and

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Warning! Always wear ANSI approved safety goggles when reading posts by
snipped-for-privacy@MolokaiColony.com says...

Graingers McMaster-Carr Me HVAC supply house
This is not a job recommended for an amateur, and it helps to be able to identify and test the capacitors in the system before rushing out to buy new ones.
--
Checkmate ®
Author, Humorist, Cynic
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On 7/21/2018 4:33 PM, Leper wrote:

It may or may not be the capacitor, however, You might want to get off your high horse there pardner. There's a new thing out there called the internet, with a dozen companies ready to sell you the capacitor you need for your air conditioner. Even Ebay and Amazon have the capacitor you may need. Getting the right part number is the proper start. Here's a random search on Ebay for Compressor/Fan capacitor.

Just the fan section of the dual capacitor on my compressor crapped out, I subbed in a cap from a squirrel cage fan I had in my shed until the proper part I order off the internet arrived.
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On 7/29/2018 7:59 PM, amdx wrote:

Eat shit amdx. Nobody said that it was the capacitor and the owner wanted immediate cooling. As per your many many fucked up past postings, You seem destined to shoot your face off in a Pro group. Take your babble back to the Homeowners. Maybe you can get some of them hurt or worse with bad advice. By the way, my business covers parts of 3 states for HVAC.
--
Machiavelli wrote:It is necessary for the state to deal in lies and half
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Leper wrote:

Back at ya Leper, you are the one in the wrong.
Nobody said that it was the capacitor and the

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On Monday, July 30, 2018 at 12:46:45 AM UTC-4, Leper wrote:

You posted:
"Well Genius... Where does a citizen purchase the needed capacitor without an account? They are not available just anywhere other then Wholesale Dealers."
Do you lie to your customers like that too? Either you're lying or you're really not very knowledgeable, one or the other.
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On 7/21/2018 2:13 PM, Catalina wrote:

About due for a Run Capacitor....Did the fan motor run?

--
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On 7/21/2018 3:13 PM, Catalina wrote:

We were in that situation. I even ran out and bought a portable ac. I learned not to wait to turn it on until absolutely necessary so I turn it on first show of hot days now.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 21 Jul 2018 12:35:14 -0400, "Catalina"

Blink is not a carefully defined word.
You say what you did but don't say what the problem is.
Was the fan in the house running?

A hint at the problem. How do you know it doesn't work? Did y ou turn off the power at the switch you can see from the compressor and forget to turn it back on? When you first turn the power back on, with your hand on the compressor (the actual compressor, the roundish thing bigger than a softball and smaller than a soccer ball. Not the box you took apart) does the compressor vibrate at all? How long does it continue to hum/vibrate? (I don't mean shake visibly. Just the kind of internal vibration you can feel with your fingers.
Does the fan inside the comparessor box run? Does it stop later? How long does it run?

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