Lowes

Monoprice warns me on the item page that shipping is delayed.
I'm pretty sure Lowes waited until I had paid to tell me that "Store
Pickup: Our stores are currently experiencing higher than normal volume.
Please wait to receive confirmation that your order is ready to be
picked up before heading to the store."
Their webpage was slow as a slow dog, too.
Reply to
micky
I forgot to say that maybe, even though they say delayed, it will be ontime.
But 9 minutes after I got the confirmation email, I got two emails saying it was indeed delayed. 8 DAYS.
One item was that roll of co-ax. The webpage said it had 1.
The other was someething they should have loads of.
HD had a delay on the first one too, but I feel like going back there.
Reply to
micky
I never would have thought of shopping at a metal recycling center. What you describe sounds like shopping at a Habitat For Humanity ReStore.
I have to ask, though. RG59?? I can't imagine what that might be good for these days. I guess it's about 12 years ago that I bought a 1000ft roll of RG6 quad shield with solid copper center conductor, versus copper clad steel. I was setting up satellite systems at the time and multiplexing Internet over coax via MoCA adapters.
Same here. The delays aren't always at the same places for us, but most of our tracked shipments seem to experience some kind of delay recently.
Reply to
Jim Joyce
I'm not in the mood to shop. I want to order online, park the car outf front and have someone bring it out to me.
Reply to
micky
I don't think I've bought any for 30 years, though I could never use 1000 feet.
I did notice that one mentioned copper clads steel and others didn't say anything.
Is the copper clad steel stiffer, for installation inside walls?
I'd rather this be flexible like a typpical cable from the wall to the TV.
Is one better electronicallyr?
Reply to
micky
Copper clad steel center conductor is inferior to (and generally less expensive than) solid copper center conductor. With the copper clad steel, when you insert the male end of the cable into a female connector, it tends to scrape some of the copper cladding away. That's can fairly quickly lead to rust and corrosion, especially for cables installed outdoors.
The brands that use solid copper are usually proud of that fact and tend to mention it. If they don't say anything, it's probably Cu-steel.
Not noticeably stiffer, just inferior quality, IMHO.
Before rust and corrosion set in, they're probably very close, electrically.
Reply to
Jim Joyce
Well, what you said is disappointing, but I'm in a hurry and one end at the signal source (a splitter) will probably only be connected once, twice at the most. And the other end at the tv will probably go into a push-on connector. Again just once, at least for several years.
I'll check out what they have tomorrow.
Reply to
micky
Thanks.

Well, what you said is disappointing, but I'm in a hurry and one end at the signal source (a splitter) will probably only be connected once, twice at the most. And the other end at the tv will probably go into a push-on connector. Again just once, at least for several years.
I'll check out what they have tomorrow.
Reply to
micky
Turns out the webpage was too compicated for me and I did go in. Not counting some social situations, probably everyone in Baltimore wears a mask without being forced to, employees and customers, young and old, black and white, plus I wore my gloves and mask.
The sell new fancy F-connnectors now,
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and
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Does the second one, and even the first, require the spcial new tool they have
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Or can I still use the plliers type crimper that I already have (both the $14 and the $40 ones)
**Some people of all sorts even wear the mask when walking alone on the street or alone in the car!
Reply to
micky
Adding to Bob's reply, if you're going to use compression connectors, which I strongly recommend, then you'll need the crimper tool that's specifically made for that type of connector. I bought mine off of Ebay some 15 years ago for $11, so HD's price of $22 seems high. I see that Amazon has a good selection of tools, as does Ebay.
The actual connectors that I use are by a company called Thomas & Betts and I picked those because all of the cable installers in my area swear by them. They come in colors for different sizes of coax - I use the purple ones for my RG6.
Also, +1 on Bob's recommendation to pick up a coax stripper. Technically, you can use a razor blade or a knife, but the stripper makes it drop dead easy to properly prepare the coax for use in a compression fitting.
Between the stripper, the compression connectors, and the compression crimper, you can make patch cables as good as anything you can find.
I assume you're shopping at HD because it's more convenient, but you'll be paying for that convenience. Ebay and Amazon will save you some money.
One last bit of advice. Watch for stingers. Those are stray strands of the outer braided conductor that accidentally get pulled in to where they touch the center conductor. If it happens, and it generally doesn't, just cut off the connector and start again with a new one. Once compressed, you can't reuse a compression connector.
Reply to
Jim Joyce
On Thu, 06 Aug 2020 16:54:57 -0400, micky posted for all of us to digest...
Micky if you still read my posts let me know. I had a reply written which would help you but it suddenly suddenly disappeared. A quick answer:
1 Yes, good 2 No need if you have #1 3 Yes 4 A stripper
I prefer Ideal for all these items. Plier type strippers will NOT work.
Reply to
Tekkie®

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