Lockset Question, Please

Hello,
Would be most appreciative for some help with this.
Lockset on door of my son's garage-to-house has broken, and he is trying to find a replacement. He is not mechanical, so enlarging the hole, etc., is not a viable option for him to do.
I am not in his area, so I cannot do for him, but he did send me the actual lockset.
What I get for him would have to be an exact, drop-in, replacement.
What's there now is a 7 year old Schlage Deadbolt set. Brass, or Brass colored.
One side has a key, and the other side has one of those flip levers. The keyed side goes to the interior garage, and the flip lever is on the interior side of the house.
The only numbers I could find on it are stamped on the inside:
    CN     E0905
I looked at a bunch of sites selling Schlage hardware, as well as the home Schlage site, but could find nothing with these numbers.
Am hoping that someone might have a cross reference chart, or... ?
Any thoughts on ?
Thanks, bob
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On 03/06/2016 01:48 PM, Bob wrote:

The hole size for any lock I've ever worked on is standard. The bore hole is 2 1/8th inch so a replacement should not be hard to find.
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On 3/6/2016 1:52 PM, philo wrote:

And the backset is adjustable in any case so any Schlage should fit. It's not a big deal to rekey the new lock to use the same key as the rest of the locks in the house (assuming they are all Schlage - if not then there's certainly no issue)
One other thought. I had a Schlage cipher pad deadbolt on my garage/shop door (detached) which was also keyed to the house locks. We found that so handy that we installed the same lock on the kitchen door (most frequently used by us (99.9% of the time) for entry to the house). You can set up multiple codes for different individuals, even one-time codes for service personnel, etc. Lock itself costs around $100 and install is only slightly more complicated than installing a new deadbolt. The normal key in knob primary lock remains but is never locked any longer. The cipher pad is the cat's a$$.
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On 3/6/2016 2:52 PM, philo wrote:

From the Schlage web site's FAQ (http://consumer.schlage.com/service-support/pages/faq_old.aspx#msp2 )
*****
What do I need to know about replacing my current door lock?
For many do-it-yourselfers, replacing door hardware is easy. For those folks who don't have a carpenter's thumb, it can appear to be a confusing chore. But you'll be surprised at how easy replacing door hardware really is. Here's what you need to know before you start.
a) You have to know the hole sizes for your knob, lever, handleset or deadbolt, as well as the distance of the latch backset and the bolt hole diameter. Often, at an additional cost, you can give the dimensions of your locks to your door supplier, who can drill the holes for you.
Deadbolt hole: This is the hole drilled through the door face to accommodate the deadbolt. The two most common hole sizes in the U.S. and Canada are 1 1/2" (38 mm) and 2 1/8" (54 mm).
Knob, lever or handleset hole: This is the hole drilled through the door face to accommodate the knob, lever or handleset. The most common size for this hole in the U.S. and Canada is 2 1/8" (54 mm). You should note that a handleset usually requires small pilot holes drilled into the door face. Pilot holes are used as guides for wood screws which attach the bottom of the handleset to the door.
Latch backset: This is the distance from the edge of the door to the middle of the lock. The two most common sizes in the United States and Canada are 2 3/8" (60 mm) and 2 3/4" (70 mm). Schlage locks fit comfortably in either hole size.
b) Depending on their style, some levers come in both left-handed and right-handed configurations. The design necessary for your door is determined by the location of the door hinges. Stand outside the door. If the hinges are on the left side, you need a left-handed lever. If the hinges are on the right side, you need a right-handed lever.
c) To keep the number of keys on your key chain to a minimum, you can have all the Schlage locks in your home matched to just one key. Simply bring the key from your existing locks to the store to have your new lock keyed. This will save you the time and cost of having your locks re-keyed or new keys cut.
*****
To my reading, you don't have to worry about hole dimensions, all their locks should fit the door holes previously drilled to fit their older locks.
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On 3/6/2016 2:52 PM, philo wrote:

Cross bore: Dexter 1 5/8 Schlage 1 1/2 Dexter close spacing (been a while; can't remember)
Backset: could be 2 3/8, 2 3/4, 5 inch, or 18 inch.
Edge of door could be RFL, RCL, mortise.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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Bob wrote:

If he had it out, he might take it to Home Depot or Lowes and ask for help. If they had the old unit it might make finding a direct replacement easy.
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I think if you take what you have to any decent locksmith, or maybe to a good hardware store, that has Schlage locks, he'll have exactly what you need, and you'll be able to see that the holes line up and the dimensions are the same.
7 years is not much and they probably still sell the same model or one with the same dimensions.
I guess this means you'd have to ship it to your son.

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On 3/6/2016 1:48 PM, Bob wrote:

Seems the simplest thing to do would be to contact Schlage directly, explain the problem, and let them offer a solution.
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Just take the darn thing to your closest locksmith, hardware store, or building center and pick up the functional replacement. Certainly nothing approaching rocket science.. If you go to a locksmith they can even provide you with a Slage that uses the same key (they can rekey to fit - usually with or without having the key in hand if the old cyl is still functional)
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On 3/6/2016 2:48 PM, Bob wrote:

The numbers are not familiar to me. Schlage makes a B160 deadbolt (which is good quality) and a B360 which I think is garbage.
Either one can be a puzzle to put together. Please consider that your son might either go to a small town hardware and ask a lot of questions, or hire a locksmith from his area. As a locksmith of 25+ years experience, that's my reccomendation to you.
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Bob posted for all of us...

Hey Bub but I don't want to be a jerk but he could just go to a big box or hardware store and ask. Then he would learn something. Time to cut the apron strings.
--
Tekkie

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