How to remove one way screw?

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I bought a bicycle rack from home depot and installed it in my garage, now my wife says it looks like shit, so now I have to move it somewhere else. But that rack comes with One-way screws, (like this one: http://www.hudsonfasteners.com/sec/sec_ow_rhms.htm ) I can't get it out...help...
is there a tool I can buy to remove the screw? this screws are stupid.. actually my wife is stupid too.
help.
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I usually use a Dremel grinding wheel, and flatten out the rounded portions and then use a normal screwdriver to remove. Obviously the screws are no longer one way screws after that, so if you'd need them to be, you'd need to replace them with new ones.
Good Luck..

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Not sure if the stuff in this set will work, but check the rest of the things they have for a better tool.
http://www.widgetsupply.com/page/WS/PROD/ht/OD01
Charlie
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Wow. That's a cool set. I just ordered one after reading your post. Thanks !
//rus//
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e=CRAFT&targetPage=%2Fmercado%2Fsearchall.jsp&vertical=SEARS&x=0&y=0&displayT arget=searchresults
//rus//
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A pair of vice grips works unless the screw is counter sunk.
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Method A Special tool that others suggested.
Method B Probably overkill -- but you can use a dab of JB Weld to adhere a hex nut to the top of the screws and then unscrew with a socket once dry. Just be sure not to get JB Weld on anything but the screws and hex nuts of you'll be back with another posting.
Method C Depending on the bike rack design you might be able to quickly grind off the tops and then remove the piece the screws were holding on. There will then be a nub sticking up the thickness of the piece the screws were attaching. You can turn this nub with needle nose pliers or may even be able to grab the nub directly with the drill chuck and unscrew.
Hope this helps, William
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Like MTL almost said ;) use a dremel or something and cut a slot then use a regular screwdriver.
Alvin in AZ
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On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 16:13:23 -0400, "Zean Smith"

What are you doing letting your wife in your garage?
A mans gotta have some privacy!
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I hear some folks park their cars in the garage. Dumbass practice if you ask me, but that's folk for ya.
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There are several good suggestions to choose from. If the others don't work there is always the ez-out. They make a set of dies that have reverse threads on them. You drill a small hole down the center of the shaft of the stuck screw. Then you screw in the reverse threat die until it tightens up. Remember, being reversed thread you screw it in counter-clockwise. When it will screw in no more, it will remove the screw. It works for rounded bolt heads or whatever. I've used mine maybe four times in the 15 years I've had the set. Usually I can grip the screw head with channelocks or wirecutters or something. If I had to find the easeouts..........that would be as big a chore as working the screw out.
Randy R. Cox
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Randy Cox wrote:

Sears sells a boxed set of 3 sizes for about $25. That's not exactly cheap, but IMHO well worth it when needed.
They last almost forever, and are under the Craftsman warranty.
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In alt.home.repair on Fri, 17 Jun 2005 22:23:27 -0500 "Randy Cox"

A variation on this is to use a left-handed drill bit when drilling the hole, and run the drill backwards. I don't know how big these screws are or what they are in or how well stuck they are, and like you I'm not saying this is the first option to try. I started doing this when I needed to dissassemble B&D appliances that used screws with weird heads**. Often they started to come out when the hole was just more than barely started. (later I got a set of bits for wierd screws)
**to keep people from repairing their own applicances. Once I took apart an air pump cigarette lighter plug, and inside was a blown fuse. Easy to replace, for 35 cents. What would the service department have done?
Left-handed drill bit start cheap enough but get expensive real soon as the size gets bigger. Can find them at almost no stores**, probably only Vermont American on the web.
***Although it was fun to ask clerks and see if they believed me.

Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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meirman wrote:

When I run into these, or even just an old screw around the house, Depending on the situation I usually drill them out. Once you drill that hole in the screw, the screw should loose a lot of its sticking power anyway. Just insert the thingy and tap a few times, then back it out.
Right too for the right job. Dont try to just rig something up, way easier to buy the thing and remove it. Can't remember what its called though.
In situations like bathroom doors where both ends of the screw are exposed I usually dont need the tool, and can just drill the whole screw out. If you get the right size bit, the screw will eventually come out when you reverse the drill. (if its exposed on both sidez)
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"easy out" :)
I prefer to "dremel" (new verb;) a slot in the top and use a regular screw driver. YMMV
Alvin in AZ
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snipped-for-privacy@XX.com writes:

curious why "cut" wouldn't do.
"I prefer to use my dremel to cut a slot in the top and use a regular screw driver."
I suppose it saves a word or two, (except in your case, where the parenthetical remark made it just as long. ;)
I hate it when people verb nouns. ^_^
but back to the matter at hand, that seems like the quickest solution assuming you have a rotary tool. If not, a file might do.
good luck!
(personally, I would have replaced the screws when installing... but that doesn't help you now.)
--
be safe.
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
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Having dealt with a few as a wrought iron man, they can be a booger.
Cut a slot with a dremel.
Sears now sells some kind of thingus that sounds like it might work.
Grind the head off with a grinder, then take the shaft out with ViseGrips.
Tell your wife she's an adult and to cope.
Steve
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On 20 Jun 2005 14:59:21 -0400, Philip Lewis

"It's not the verbing that weirds the language, it's the renounification." -I forget who.
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The cut off wheel in a demel is round, deeper cut with less "hanggin' over;)" to mar the surface? A hacksaw's blade is straight and usually too thin both.
A dremel's cut-off wheel might be too thin too but the slot can be widened to adjust that width. Or use a thicker cut-off wheel to start with? I have three store bought thicknesses and two homemade thicknesses. :)

Did with dremel right after I got my first one ('77?). :)

Flip, you been listening to that dangged ol' Rammstein again? ;)
Alvin in AZ (Du Hast rocks!;)
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Depending on what is around the screw and what would be left after the had is gone, you could center punch really good, drill a small hole easy to keep centered and than drill with a bit slightly larger than the shank until the had fall off. The bike rack is now free, You now got to get the screw out by grabbing the shank with players wise grips or whatever is handy.
Why did you use the one way screws in the first place?
MG
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