How hard is it to replace a clutch in a 5-speed manual transmission?



I got the shop manual (and a helmet!) for free from the dealer (the helmet was a factory promo) in 1982 when I bought my first GT650M Sebring (as I recall).
It sucked. But I did use it to adjust the cam shims, as I recall. And to replace the alternator (they used a *permanent* magnet!).
But it still sucked. Millions of steps are missed.
Still, I agree that the FSM is required. But that doesn't make it not suck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/21/2017 12:27 PM, Chaya Eve wrote:

Yup. I went through that last year when the stator on my DL-650 smoked. Judging from the forums that's not a rare event. The V-Strom doesn't have a lot of body work but it all has to come off so you can get the tank off so you have some hope of getting to the connectors.
I've got a DR-650 and a Sportster too and they have me spoiled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I know this is long but there are zero DIYs that I can find on the net for my particular vehicle but there are a few that are for "similar" vehicles from Toyota (see the reference section for what DIYs I did use).
How does this "future DIY" look for putting a DIY together?
New Tools: . Buy/rent/borrow/steal a transmission jack or saddle Jack: https://www.harborfreight.com/automotive-motorcycle/transmission-jacks/450-lb-low-lift-transmission-jack-61232.html Saddle: (Amazon.com product link shortened) . Buy/rent/borrow/steal the proper centering tool & bearing pullers . Pilot bearing puller (or blind hole puller from HF or autozone) . <http://www.harborfreight.com/blind-h...ler-95987.html> . Note that some people pack behind the bearing with grease to punchhole it out . Clutch alignment tool (fits splines of clutch disc)
Parts for the Toyota W59 transmission (Toyota 4Runner, 2WD, base, 5-speed). . New clutch disk (apparently Aisin, Eddy, or MC but not LUK or XTD; 1200# weight?) . New pressure plate . New pilot bearing (is that the same as a throwout bearing?) . It is said to only use the factory NSK throwout bearing (orange inner seal) . New #136? flywheel (resurfacing=$60 Kevin @408-379-7290, All Standard) . New rear main seal (since you're pulling the flywheel anyway) . Locktite Red (flywheel bolts & clutch cover bolts) . Locktite Blue (starter and bellhousing bolts) . Maybe a new slave cylinder (they don't last forever)
Existing tools: . Lots of 1/2-inch sized u-joints . Literally 2-1/2 to 3 feet of 1/2-inch socket extension bars (16" bare minimum) . Snap-ring pliers (for the transmission case snap ring) . Gear pullers . Torque wrench & sockets (all 1/2 inch sized) . Note that the 4-cyl ten 14mm flywheel bolts are 12 point (not 6 point)
Existing fluids: . 2.7 quarts replacement 75W90 GL4 gear lube . Thick high-moly graphite grease to lube the spline input shaft & ID of throwout bearing . Toyota FIPG for the rear main seal (RTV is ok but not as good) . No grease on diaphragm springs, pressure plate or throwout bearing face. . Light grease on throwout bearing ID, input shaft splines . Light grease on clutch fork pivot points & outside the shaft collar
Torque specs: . Starter bolts 30ft# . Bellhousing bolts 54ft# . Flywheel (either 19 ft lbs+1/4 turn for 3RZ or 65ftlbs for the 2RZ and 5VZ engines)
Here is my tentative DIY (composite from a few non-correct-truck DIYs): (It's detailed because I have never done it; so I might miss a critical step otherwise.) . The night before, PB blast (or oil and bang) all bolts if necessary (mine are clean) . Check before/after clutch pedal free play (1/4" to prevent throwout bearing wear) . While the 4Runner is on the ground, put the transmission in 1st gear . Remove the cabin gear shift mechanism . While above, snap pictures of the pitch-fork-shaped wiring harness from above . <
http://www.showstop.org/images/misc/r150F-harness.jpg
. If possible, unbolt the "conning tower" for the shift mechanism . Disconnect the battery negative cable (since the starter bolts will be removed) . Then 4x-jackstand the car as high as you can get it (I have four 18", 6 ton stands).\ . Attempt to level the vehicle as best you can so the engine is level with the trans . While below, snap pictures of the pitch-fork-shaped wiring harness . Loosen both the fill plug and drain plug (should be easy as I just drained it 3 days ago) . Drain the expensive Red Line MT-90 I just put in! (20 bucks a quart!) . (Lesson for next time: Use cheap gear oil for the first flush-fill & then the good stuff.) . Remove the rear-facing drive shaft 14mm bolts & pull out the drive shaft (do first if hard) . Remove 2x12mm bolts for the clutch slave cylinder & hang safely on hangar wire . It is said to not follow FSM procedure which says to remove exhaust pipe (leave the pipe) . Remove 17mm bolts holding exhaust pipe bracket to transmission housing . I don't know if the next step is needed because some say yes while others say no . Remove 12mm bolts holding exhaust pipe into the bracket (these may be corroded) . Do no separate the exhaust pipes! . Remove 2x10mm oxygen sensor bracket bolts holding the wiring & sensor to the housing . Remove the reverse light sensor . Remove the speed sensor . Remove the oxygen sensor . Remove the 7/8ths-inch speedometer cable hex cap . Remove the main harness which connects to a bell housing bolt . Remove two 14mm bolts around the starter housing . Remove the bottom set of forward facing long 14mm or 17mm bellhousing bolts . Remove the bottom series of rearward facing 14mm bolts around the bell housing . Remove anything else in the way . Zip tie any cables in place so that they don't get damaged later . Then support the transmission with a transmission jack or jack saddle . Strap the transmission in routing the straps under any wires . Remove the 12mm and 14mm bolts holding the rear transmission mount assembly . Remove the top series of three short 17mm bolts on the bell housing . These are said to need a 1/2-inch short socket, swivel, & at least 16" to 18" socket bars . The frame cross member is welded in so you need to twist the transmission . Tip the front down an twist the front of the transmission to the driver side . Lower the transmission (most seem to do it by hand even when they have a jack???) . In a star pattern, remove the series of 12mm bolts holding the clutch into the bell housing . You must snap pictures of the asymmetrical nature of the clutch disc before removing . V6 has the springs toward the flywheel; the 2.7L I4 has the springs toward the trans . Remove the clutch disc . Remove the pressure plate . Remove the ten (12-point) 14mm bolts ringing the flywheel to the engine . Have the flywheel replaced or resurfaced . Remove the pilot bearing in the back of the engine with a bearing puller . Most DIYs stop right there (reassembly supposedly being the reverse of removal)
On reassembly (which most DIYs ignore), these topics came up after the fact: . A screwdriver wedged into the flywheel teeth immobilizes it for bolt tightening . It is said that so does a punch through one of the flywheel holes . The wiring harness layout has to be considered while lifting the transmission back . It is said to put it in gear when aligning splines (allows output & input shaft to turn) . Input shaft alignment stage 1 is getting the splines to go into the clutch disc. . Input shaft alignment stage 2 is the last inch onto the input shaft bearing . Jack fine tuning matters in that last inch (use bellhousing bolts as alignment pins) . It is said the bellhousing has an alignment dowel near the slave-cylinder mount . It is said to grease the top & inside of the clutch fork ends . And grease the adjoining surfaces of the throwout bearing. . Grease the divot in the middle of the clutch fork . Just before you install the clutch slave cylinder, grease the divot at the end fork . Cover the clutch fork mushroom bolt with HD grease.
References this came out of (none of which are my vehicle and year) <http://www.ttora.com/forum/2-early-tacoma-tech/149715-5vz-clutch-job.html <http://www.ttora.com/forum/2-early-tacoma-tech/146210-w59-shifting-problems.html <http://www.ttora.com/forum/6-performance-engine-exhaust/35936-clutch-install-tips.html <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-sscHblanc
.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/09/2017 8:04 AM, Chaya Eve wrote:

As always, observe the RTFM principle before doing anything.

The clutch alignment tool does not need to have splines. That said, most people of my acquaintance keep on hand a swag of transmission input shafts from trans rebuild jobs. Ask about the possibility of securing one of these at a trans place near you. Alternatively, I have had success building a shaft that is too small up to size using humble old plastic electrical insulation tape. Did that on the tractor I recently changed a clutch on since we didn't have the exact dummy pilot shaft we needed, and it worked perfectly. Necessity is the mother of invention, not to mention cost savings.

No. It is the bearing or bush that fits into the back end of the crankshaft and supports the front end of the gearbox input shaft, hence supporting the weight of the clutch plate.

Pressure plate bolt torques? As critical as flywheel bolt.

Learn to differentiate between pedal free play and release bearing free play - you should be able to feel two (2) distinct steps - pedal play, then release play. Some systems work on zero free play at the release bearing (e.g. carbon thrust block types) but, in the case of hydraulic systems, there is *always* a need for free play at the master cylinder end. This is to ensure correct operation of the MC hydraulics.

This will impact on how far you can lower the transmission to possibly gain the required clearance from the transmission hump or access to upper bell housing bolts.

This point can, if care isn't taken, result in damage to the exhaust pipe if following the point immediately above.
The above two steps will always be a case of *it depends*.

That movement in other than the fore and aft direction that the trans mount adapter needs to be capable of will be of great assistance here.

Depends on how strong/old you are.

No mention of what you should be inspecting for, both on bits you intend to replace and those you intend to refit. Flywheel face, for instance.
No mention of cleaning and safety precautions associated with same.

These are the sorts of things tradesmen learn, and do, almost as a reflex action after many years of involvement with the trade.

Top gear always.
As a learning process, when you have the trans out, select low gear, turn the output shaft and discover why top gear is the choice.

Use care on the type and placement of any grease. Excesses can be bad news as can the wrong type of grease.

--

Xeno

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/22/2017 08:21 PM, Xeno wrote:

At one time I had a generic alignment tool. It had a number of interchangeable ends for the various pilot bearing sizes, and a tapered guide to fit various sizes of clutch bores. However they now have very inexpensive plastic tools for most popular vehicles. iirc the one I got was $3 or $4.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/09/2017 2:46 PM, rbowman wrote:

We had such a generic alignment tool available. The issue was that it didn't handle the dual clutch system on the tractor at all well. The local dealer didn't have a *factory one* for the tractor but he lent us one he'd made up on a lathe. It wasn't a firm fit however, hence the need to pack it up with tape. Coupled with 4 alignment dowels, made out of bolts with heads removed, fitted into the block, the mating up process was the smoothest I'd ever encountered.
--

Xeno

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I REALLY don't think so. Hint: no splines on the flywheel.
The clutch disk has to line up with the pilot bearing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, you are of course correct, I made an error about spline on the flywheel. Brainfart.
--

The problem is Donald Trump. The solution is impeachment or, the otherwise legal
removal, from office, of the greatest threat to peace the world has ever known.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 14:57:38 +0000, Stormin' Norman

This seems to show exactly what you're talking about at time 142 seconds: <
https://youtu.be/9UmrCl2nLKM?t

https://youtu.be/9UmrCl2nLKM?t
2>

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 18:24:24 +0000 (UTC), Chaya Eve

Here is a nice, step by step procedure for clutch replacement, including one exploded diagram.
http://www.autozone.com/repairguides/Toyota-Corolla-1988-1997-Repair-Guide/CLUTCH/Driven-Disc-and-Pressure-Plate/_/P-0900c1528006f59a
Note, in the diagram, they label what I call a "throw-out bearing" as a "release bearing". I am sure their terminology is accurate.
Video's are nice but still-image, annotated, step by step instructions can be invaluable.
--

The problem is Donald Trump. The solution is impeachment or, the otherwise legal
removal, from office, of the greatest threat to peace the world has ever known.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is this very first second of this video showing the alignment tool in action? <
https://youtu.be/NcTmlO9XN1E

https://youtu.be/NcTmlO9XN1E

It seems to take a split second, but the video is artificially sped up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/23/2017 11:59 AM, Chaya Eve wrote:

Yeah, that's a pretty good video. It just holds the clutch plate in place and then you pull it out when the pressure plate is snugged down. The video also illustrates what I meant about working around tightening the pressure plate screws gradually and in a pattern around the pressure plate. You'll also want to do the gradual thing when removing it or it will start to cock and make removing the screws difficult. Once you've backed them out enough to release the spring pressure all around then you remove them one by one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 14:47:08 +0000, Stormin' Norman

Most DIYs seem to gloss over this step.
As an example, this DIY at time 331 seconds, simply shows the bright red centering tool already in place! :( <
https://youtu.be/S5xSOy03NAg?t31

https://youtu.be/S5xSOy03NAg?t31

That same video, shows at time 352 seconds, a *different* centering tool. <
https://youtu.be/S5xSOy03NAg?t52

https://youtu.be/S5xSOy03NAg?t52

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 17:59:25 +0000 (UTC), Chaya Eve

I did a search on "using clutch alignment tool" and came up with this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfIu5MGdx-E

--

The problem is Donald Trump. The solution is impeachment or, the otherwise legal
removal, from office, of the greatest threat to peace the world has ever known.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't recall using anything but a broomstick and my eyeballs last time I did a clutch. Of course that was a '66 F-100 3-speed. I bought a new flywheel - it was only 50 bucks. Not saying that's the same as a 4Runner, and the OP should go with the flow. I did ruin a pressure plate on my VW, and had to do the job twice. Don't support your trans - engine in the case of the VW - in sand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/23/2017 11:59 AM, Chaya Eve wrote:

It's one of those things you don't necessarily think about that screws up someone without experience in the job. It's like the whole angle discussion. They might show sliding the transmission back in place like a stick of butter in a hot frying pan but after you've laid on your back sweating and cursing trying to rattle a heavy chunk of metal just right to get it started in the splines you realize the importance of being able to line everything up nicely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/09/2017 6:33 AM, rbowman wrote:

Amen to that.
--

Xeno

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is remarkably easy to do on the BMW 2002.... you can have one person lifting it on a couple 2X4s while another person rocks it back and forth until it slides right in. The five-speed Getrag on the E28 isn't that much worse. You can drop the damn transmission in the driveway without a lift and have it back in the same afternoon. Part of this is because the manual is very good, part is because the transmission is light, and part of it is because you can actually see the thing well enough to see that it's lined up or not.
On the other hand, you couldn't pay me enough to do a Ford Econoline again. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/09/2017 9:18 AM, Scott Dorsey wrote:

SB Bedford bus, cast iron case gearbox, no pits or hoist. Did I mention the side skirt on the bus were *low*?
--

Xeno

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Sep 2017 14:47:08 +0000, Stormin' Norman
The videos are instrumental for me to visualize what you're saying, as this one, for example, at time 195 seconds, shows that throwout bearing (aka release bearing) in action. <
https://youtu.be/9UmrCl2nLKM?t

https://youtu.be/9UmrCl2nLKM?t
5>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.