Galvanized pipe too short for tub spout

On Tue, 13 Jun 2017 14:00:27 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

My kid brother lives in a small town in that remote portion of North Dakota known as Saskatchewan. He owns the first property outside town on the main road, and the property next to him came up for sale about 2 years ago. It shares his driveway. The asking price, with a 2 year old roof, wiring, and plumbing, including appliances less than 5 years old and a 2 year old lawn tractor was $5000 Canadian. He said he just KNEW what kind of neighbours he'd get for $5000, so he bought it. The seller had not managed to sell his late seventies Lincoln Town Car by the time he left town, so he signed it over as part of the deal.
Perfectly liveable little house, with no plumbing or electrical issues, and a good roof. You need to truck in your water, and pump out the sewage (no town sewers, and no weeping beds allowed - and gawdawful water - but only $5K A few miles up the road, where you CAN put in a septic tank, and the water is still terrible, the property would have been worth about 4X as much. Get up into Yorkton it would be about $60,000 - $120,000. 30 km south in Mellvile, about $35000
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 11 Jun 2017 15:43:59 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Talk to someone at a plumbing supply store. They all sell to non-plumbers, and he may have something no one here has thought of.
And he'll have the adapter too.
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What's on the other/back side of the wall where the faucet is located? That as saved my butt a few times over 60 years of do-it-yourselfing.
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Unfortunately, there is a corner shower on the back side of the wall in the other bathroom. So no access from the back, even if I wanted to tear into it (which I don't).
Her house is two hours away from me. We're busy moving her to an assisted living home, so I don't have the time or money to invest in major repairs. Just trying to fix anything small that we can before we try selling it.
Anthony
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You should be able to use a hack saw to cut off the wall end of a replacement spout to make it short enough to work with the current nipple. Then use a bead of caulk to fill whatever gap remains. This isn't rocket science, just basic handyman stuff.
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It's not hard to do, but it's difficult to do well.
The spouts are made of a thin metal, covered with a thinner layer of chrome plating. Making a straight cut on the odd shaped spout would hard enough, and the plating would most likely chip where it was cut.
I think the adapter Uncle shared the link too will accomplish what I need.
Anthony
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The 1/2 by 1/2 adapter from Uncle sure looks like it should solve the probl em for well under $10.00.
I would start talking to Realtors as soon as possible. They should be able to tell you what they think are the "Must Haves" in the way of repairs to sell the house. It sounds like you are talking $50,000 or more off the pri ce compared to a "regular" listing, but there are probably some minimum thi ngs that should be working to help sell it quickly at a reasonable price.
Check with 3 (or maybe more) Realtors and see if they give you similar stor ies.
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I'm hoping so. I don't really want to invest too much time and effort into it.

I put out a few feelers to realtors but haven't had the time to follow up on it yet. We're not too concerned about the selling price, as Medicaid basically requires you to go broke before they'll start paying anything. A higher selling price would just mean another 6-12 months living off her own money before she can apply for Medicaid.
Anthony
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On Monday, June 12, 2017 at 9:13:42 AM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

It's not an actual rule, but a fairly common occurrence:
The more money she has for self-funding her care, the better a place she may be able to move into. Once she's there, she won't get kicked out once the Medicaid benefits kick in.
Underselling the house may mean lower quality care for mom.
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Well, I finally got back over to mom's house but things didn't quite go as planned... :)
I received the adapter fitting you gave me the link to:

I threaded it on the existing stub out, but it still stuck out about a 1/4" too far from the wall. No worries, I bought a trim ring too, so I stuck that to the shower wall with some plumbers putty and starting screwing on the tub spout (hand pressure only). It was all going so well until I was about 1/8" from seating the spout. That's when the pipe inside the wall broke loose! Dang.
So, I removed the tub spout and fitting. Couldn't get the stub to come out through the hole in the shower surround, so I let it drop inside the wall. I looked inside with a flashlight and could see the elbow that was soldered to the pipe slipped off the end of the pipe. Bad solder joint. Grr...
I did some measuring to see what was on the back side of the wall, then used a long screwdriver to make an exploratory hole into the adjacent room. Naturally, it was right behind the toilet (not the shower as I originally thought).
I removed the toilet tank, and cut a small 6"x8" access hole so I could get inside the wall.
Whoever the "professional plumber" was who installed this did a terrible job. Not only was the solder joint bad, but they did not anchor the drop ear elbow. They had simply hammered one of the ears into the side of a stud.
Fixing this will be tricky since the pipe runs right alongside a stud. There's certainly no room to get in there with a torch next to the stud and plastic tub surround, even with a heat shield.
I'm not crazy about sharkbite fittings, but it seems like the most workable solution in this situation. Unfortunately, I will need to cut the pipe back to get clean pipe. I'm not sure how I'm going to get in there to cut the pipe since it's right next to the stud.
Assuming I can get the pipe fixed, I need to figure out how to secure the new drop ear elbow from the back side.
Sheesh, this was suppose to be such a simple repair. I'm about ready to say screw it and let the next homeowner deal with it, but it has become something of a challenge now. I'm determined to fix it! :)
Yeah, the next homeowner will probably come in and gut everything, ripping out my proud new work, but I'll have peace of mind. :)
Anthony
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On Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 11:14:02 AM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

Sorry to hear that. It's the bad scenario we all agreed can easily happen when you start trying to fix old plumbing that you have no or limited access to. Given that this is a fixer upper in need of a lot of repairs, I would not hesitate to use sharkbite if it makes things easier. Good chance it's all going to be ripped out soon anyway.
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All I wanted to do was replace the tub spout... :)
I've had a lot of experience with old plumbing at my in-laws house (galvanized pipe, even worse). I've learned nothing is easy when it comes to old plumbing.

Access is going to be the biggest problem.
I won't be able to get back to mom's house for a few days.
Anthony
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On Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 11:47:28 AM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

I just went through a similar evaluation with my shower. It has 25 year old Hans Grohe faucets. The shower volume had gone down gradually, getting really noticeable the last year or so. I had cleaned the existing shower head, no change. Recently I bought a new dual head shower contraption, where you can use one or the other or both heads at the same time. No change. I then realized that the water flow out of the pipe was low. So, what to do? I considered taking the valves apart, but these fancy Grohe handles do not use screws, they just press fit on. I figured after all those years, they were not likely to come off easily, if at all, and there is no way to even pull on them, ie you can't get a puller type thing on them, etc. And the last thing I needed was to have to put in new ones, because these still look and work fine, other than the volume issue.
So, I decided to try blowing it out with the air compressor. I rigged up a fitting, blew air through the shower pipe and out the tub and sink fixtures. And voila, I'd say the volume easily doubled. And the new shower heads now work fine, the flow can support both of them. I got lucky.
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On Thu, 15 Jun 2017 15:10:21 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

When you are finished patching the pipes together, close the new access hole, open another one a few inches higher, and pour the space between the studs full of quick drying concrete. That will handle anchoring the drop ear elbow - - - -
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