2 x 4's the old ones

On 3/19/17 10:49 AM, Muggles wrote:

SNIP

Had to be- cows were a lot bigger back then.
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On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 7:40:52 AM UTC-4, philo wrote:

IDK what they used back then, but 2x4s today are not pine, they are Douglas Fir.
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On 03/19/2017 9:39 AM, trader_4 wrote: ...

Only if you're in the western US or Canada (or Japan/China where most Doug fir is exported to)...the kids in the lumber yards around here don't even know what "Doug fur" is; some kind of pet, maybe???
--


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On 03/19/2017 09:43 AM, dpb wrote:

I live in Wisconsin which still has a lumber industry, I guess it would be easy enough to check
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On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 10:43:49 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

The local HD and lumber yards here in NJ are full of 2x4s made of Douglas Fir. I guess they do use other softwoods too, but DF is a readily available, common and cheap choice.
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Douglas Fir is WAY too valuable to be used for residential framing, even here in Canada./ What we buy is labled as "SPF" = meaning mixed softwood - loosely spruce, pine and fir - but the fir is seldom "douglas Fir" (more likely Balsam in the east and Alpine in the west) and there is sometimes a bit of tamarac and hemlock mixed in.
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On 03/19/2017 03:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

http://americansoftwoods.com/species/
"Douglas Fir is North America’s most plentiful softwood species, accounting for one fifth of the continent’s total softwood reserves. Because Douglas Fir and Larch share nearly identical structural characteristics and physical working properties, the two are interchangeable in dimension lumber but are often kept separate in appearance grade lumber. The Douglas Fir-Larch species group is dimensionally stable and universally recognized for its superior strength-to-weight ratio."
Around here, if it isn't a Doug Fir, it's a Ponderosa Pine. Alpine Fir tends to be, well, alpine, and not easy to get to. Douglas Fir, btw, isn't a fir. There's also some larch and small stands of cedar that were overlooked or too hard to harvest.
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wrote:

Same here in Florida at the borgs. It would be difficult to even find douglas fir and, if so, it would not be cheap. I have trouble imagining it - a western wood - winding up in New Jersey when SYP or SFP is much closer and cheaper/
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On Monday, March 20, 2017 at 10:56:49 AM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

Better take that up with Home Depot:
2 in. x 4 in. x 96 in. Prime Kiln-Dried Douglas Fir Stud
2 in. x 4 in. x 96 in. Prime Kiln-Dried Douglas Fir Stud 5.0 out of 5 (2) Write a Review Questions & Answers (2) $3.13 /each
Neptune, NJ store.
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wrote:

Strange, no douglas fir shows of on that store's page for studs. Yellow pine, yes but not in stock. The ubiquitous "whitewood" (SFP) yes but no douglas fir. Got a better link? http://www.homedepot.com/s/wood%2520stud?NCNI-5
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On Monday, March 20, 2017 at 7:09:39 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

They show up as Douglas Fir 2x4s in the Neptune store when I did the search. That's what I quoted from above. IDK what more you want.
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On 03/20/2017 05:09 PM, dadiOH wrote:

That's a new (to me) use of 'whitewood'. I've always heard it used for poplar or any of the hardwoods with no prominent grain or color that you can doll up to resemble more expensive cabinet woods.
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On Monday, March 20, 2017 at 8:47:29 PM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

I've seen it on the display of SPF studs at Home Despot.
Cindy Hamilton
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On Tue, 21 Mar 2017 03:48:53 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton

Half the droids at Home Despot know nothing of their products.
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On Sunday, March 19, 2017 at 5:59:20 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Maybe true in Canada, but HD and lumberyards in the US are full of cheap 2x4s made of Douglas Fir.
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It's probably just whatever wood was plentiful in your area. Around here that would be Douglas Fir or Hemlock (often referred to collectively as "hemfir").
The older wood was typically old growth trees that had much finer and tighter grain than the new lumber you find today.
The wood has probably gotten harder from drying out for 100 years also.
My in-laws house has the old 2x4 studs. The worst part about working with the old rough cut lumber is the splinters! :)
I found a few old 8x8 beams in their basement while we were working. I don't know if they were extras leftover from construction, or if someone removed them from somewhere at some point. I resawed them into boards and built a nice bookshelf for my mother-in-law. Nice looking wood for "construction" lumber.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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In my early 1950s, California, cheap tract house, the framing is rough-sawn redwood. Whether it's coast redwood, or high-sierra redwood, I don't know. Anyway, nails don't stay nailed very well, but the bugs have given it a pass.
--
croy

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