I'itoi onion

for hot dry climates. from da wiki...
"a prolific multiplier onion cultivated in the Baboquivari Peak Wilderness, Arizona area. This small-bulb type has a shallot-like flavour and is easy to grow and ideal for hot, dry climates. Bulbs are separated, and planted in the fall 1 in below the surface and 12 in apart. Bulbs will multiply into clumps and can be harvested throughout the cooler months. Tops die back in the heat of summer and may return with heavy rains; bulbs can remain in the ground or be harvested and stored in a cool dry place for planting in the fall. The plants rarely flower; propagation is by division."
quoted from:
_Allium crop science_
: recent advances, edited by H.D. Rabinowitch and L. Currah
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Cluster onions!
I was too cold for potato onions.
Can they take a cold zone 6c over winter?
Any nutrition data? Considered a yellow, white, red, or sweet onion?
Reply to
T
T wrote:
are you near Baboquivari Peak Wilderness in AZ?
they can survive that.
the multiplier onions i have growing now didn't have any problems with our severe winter here last year so i would guess it will survive about anything.
just make sure they are not planted in a poorly drained area so they're not sitting in a puddle all winter.
it is a multiplier onion, so like a shallot or potato onion. of the variety Aggregatum group. so if you can look up the nutrition of the shallots or potato onions this one should be close to those.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Thank you!
Now to find some for next year's planting!
Ate my first onion from the garden today. Wow! Way tastier than store bought! The wind had broke its stock, so I harvested the stock and ate it. When a two weeks had past and it did not grow a new stock, I harvested the bulb. It was about the size of a tennis ball.
YUM! Life is good!
-T
Reply to
T
How big are these onions (diameter)?
Walnut sized is too hard on my hands to prepare.
Reply to
T
T wrote: ...
i don't know, sorry, but there are gadgets which can be used to dice onions or you can just cook or use them whole.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
T wrote: ...
y.w.
i love green onions and green garlic.
i'm not quite ready to lift and replant the onions i have going now but i'm looking forwards to using some of these to see how good they might be when they are ready.
:)
songbird
Reply to
songbird
it is the washing that is the big pain in the ass. Hands start to cramp. This is why I no long do shallots
Reply to
T
They are bunches like shallots. too small for me to handle.
RATS !!!
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Reply to
T
T wrote: ...
how do you cope with garlic prep then as the cloves can be small?
for the smaller cucumbers that have a lot of bumps on them i use a scrubby or even a brush to wash things.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Garlic prep is a labor of love!
Back when I tried growing lemon cucumbers I scrubbed off the stickers. I only got two per bush and gave up.
Reply to
T
In article songbird writes:
I'm reclaiming garden space from the last year or two of less than stellar maintenance, but I strongly hope that this will be the year that I have space prepped for garlic.
In addition to being a garden milestone, garlic is the only non-meat part of my canned pasta sauce that isn't from my garden. Well, this year I need to re-establish the orageno, but I'm good (so far) on basil.
Reply to
Drew Lawson
In article T writes:
Aha! That is what "bunching onions," as I have encountered elsewhere means.
Thank you, odd collision.
Reply to
Drew Lawson
...
to make it easier on yourself make sure to plant it far enough apart that you can easily get the hoe between them.
mine are just now showing scapes. i leave them on because they give large enough bulbules that they make good starts for others.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
there are a lot of terms in casual gardening and vegetable gardening that are not precisely defined.
a green onion, a spring onion, scallions, chives can be a number of different things. add in the talk about potato onions, walking onions, egyptian onions, bunches and such, then there are things like ramps and odd or large garlics which some may consider onions or not. and then we have the tulip off to the side minding it's own business and garlic chives. :)
it's fun to read up on and to have a few of this and that to see what they grow like.
i'm trying to be patient with these bunching onions here but it's hard to not want to go out and dig some up and eat them in a stir fry (rite neow!)...
songbird
Reply to
songbird

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