garlic question

My wife planted garlic in pots on the deck in early spring and got some
nice cloves of garlic.
Now for some reason she planted more about a month or so ago. It is up
and growing but freeze is expected this week.
Can she just let it be and will it return next year and be OK?
Reply to
invalid unparseable
Where are you? The rule of thumb I've heard is to plant 6-8 weeks before the ground freezes. Some softneck types do well spring planted.
Reply to
Gary Woods
it really depends upon what kind of garlic it is and how cold hardy it might be.
here i grow some hardneck garlic which can freeze and it will be ok. i don't even mulch it. i probably would not want to grow it in a pot, but otherwise it has been reliable every season i've grown it for about 15yrs. some years i've planted it the day before the ground has frozen and other times it gets planted earlier (this year i got it planted last week). it will grow as long as there is enough light and it is warm enough, then after that if there is enough snow cover it will stay green under the snow, but even if there isn't any snow cover and it freezes back to the surface it will recover once it warms up and then it grows until it finishes.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
We are in northern Delaware. From what Songbird says I guess we will let it go and see what happens. She only has about a half dozen cloves planted. We had a large garden years ago but shade and deer did it in.
Reply to
invalid unparseable
Hi Frank,
Check where she bought them from and see what zone they are rated for.
I am zone 6b. My hard necks LOVE the snow and ice!
-T
Reply to
T
...
likely a softneck garlic then. no idea how cold hardy those might be planted in a pot, but you are far enough south that perhaps they'll be ok.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Maybe. We grow garlic out here on commercial farms. And a lot for seeds too. Trying to figure out what variety they are is TOP SECRET. The only thing I can tell you about them is that they are soft neck.
I have a feral bin just for such silliness. I planted green onion onions stubs from the grocery store and two years later they are still going at it! At Songbird's direction, I even collected seeds to try to grow them legitimately this years.
I have some garlic in the feral bin that is three years old. What a mess. Looks like grass growing at this point. Grass shoots that taste like garlic. Hmmmm..... Maybe I pick those???
Commercial growers are not going to choose things that are hard to grow.
So basically what Songbird said. Give it a try! Love to hear back on the results.
Reply to
T
Will let you know. The garlic, half dozen plants, is still flourishing in a deck pot maybe because we have yet to have had a hard freeze.
For some reason she also planted a couple of cloves in a pot with a little holly tree she has been nursing for a couple of years. She said it looked drooping and told me to plant it in an open spot out front under a Norway spruce. It was getting pot bound and cloves did not want to be pulled so I left them. Will be interesting to see if they survive too.
Reply to
invalid unparseable
...
don't be surprised if it does and for several years after until the holly completely shades it out.
one thing about any allium family plant is that the roots will attract worms (if they are around your area).
when i clean up the garlic and clip the roots and stems off and also any dirt that comes off and extra tunic (bulb wrapping) - all of that goes into the worm farm here and the worms really like it. same for onion peels, etc. i don't like to put a lot of onion stuff in the worm buckets from when we cook, but if i can dry it out completely that helps a lot.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Area I put the holly might get only few hours of sun every day but I think it may thrive there.
We have a shade and deer problem but seeing good results wife had this year and reading deer do not like garlic I think I will plant some next year close to the house.
My neighbors got stuck in India last spring and most of the summer and I planted his garden with tomatoes, squash, green beans and carrots and deer ate everything to the ground.
Reply to
invalid unparseable
...
i hope so! :)
it won't keep deer from finding and eating other plants. it doesn't deter them. some young deer will still sample onions and garlic or any other plant we grow here even if it is reputedly deer repellent or resistant or not attractive to deer. the young ones don't know better...
fences help us here, but not everything is fenced so we do get deer going through here at times and eating anything they can find that they like. until i can get a full enclosed fence put up they'll be around. i just try to make it not so easy for them...
songbird
Reply to
songbird
We were having trouble with deer until we got a motion sensor activated squirter for the garden. That kept them away.
Paul
Reply to
Pavel314
...
the important key word there is "the". :)
for us there are many different gardens and about an acre in size.
i have two edges fenced now with proper fencing for a change so that has cut down on traffic a great deal, but the deer can come in from the front, driveway and from the south side which doesn't have a full fence on it yet. eventually i hope to finish some more fence that will enclose all the food gardens and some of the front flower gardens.
if i stay on here longer term i'll be able to do what i want. until then Mom rules and she doesn't want more fences up to look at. anything i can do for now is just improve what we have so that the rabbits and groundhogs can't get through so easily.
songbird
Reply to
songbird

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